Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWater Legislation
IN THE NEWS

Water Legislation

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
September 6, 1987
Is it any wonder that Southern California has difficulty in getting needed water legislation enacted? Setting aside the formidable, if not always rational, opposition from Northern California legislators, we are also treated to the opposition of some Southerners who simply should know better. The inaccuracies in the article (Op-Ed Page, Aug. 19) by state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) are illustrative. The senator reported that the state Senate has passed a bill that would appropriate $1.3 billion for water projects for Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2009 | GEORGE SKELTON
The California Legislature did something right, it would seem. So did Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Something huge and historic. The wiggle word "seem" is needed because the exact future of the sweeping water legislation passed at dawn Wednesday is far from certain. For starters, success will hinge on whether voters next November approve an $11.1-billion water bond issue. Last-minute sweeteners that fattened the bond size left ample opportunity for opponents to cry "too much pork."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
The chances that Sacramento will break the stalemate on California water policy this summer grew dimmer Tuesday when Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said he would not sign legislation that didn't include bonds for new reservoirs and dams. The declaration signaled Schwarzenegger's dissatisfaction with a package of water bills Democrats are hoping to move through the Legislature before the mid-September adjournment. "I will not sign anything that does not have above-the-ground, below-the-ground water storage," the governor said at a news conference on the steps of the Capitol in Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
Lawmakers have been chewing over water legislation for weeks, unable to seal a final deal despite threats from the governor, weekend negotiating sessions and their own deep desire to disprove the widespread perception that they can't get anything done. Many of the choking points involve often arcane details of water policy and regional self-interests that haven't always followed the usual partisan lines. "It's fear of losing water, fear of having to pay for stuff," said Ellen Hanak of the Public Policy Institute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
Lawmakers have been chewing over water legislation for weeks, unable to seal a final deal despite threats from the governor, weekend negotiating sessions and their own deep desire to disprove the widespread perception that they can't get anything done. Many of the choking points involve often arcane details of water policy and regional self-interests that haven't always followed the usual partisan lines. "It's fear of losing water, fear of having to pay for stuff," said Ellen Hanak of the Public Policy Institute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2009 | GEORGE SKELTON
Negotiators are on the brink of achieving the most comprehensive California water legislation in half a century. They're also in danger of an embarrassing belly flop. Both sides -- whether talking about Democrats vs. Republicans, environmentalists vs. farmers, cities vs. burgs -- have attained their top priorities, realizing gains that seemed almost impossible just 18 months ago. GOP lawmakers and San Joaquin Valley growers have secured a pathway leading to probable construction of a long-controversial canal to carry fresh Sacramento River water around the fragile, brackish delta and directly into an aqueduct heading south.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1986
Arizona, once known as a bastion of conservatism, has had one of the nation's most progressive ground water management laws since 1980. Now, the state is pioneering again. The Legislature has passed, and Gov. Bruce Babbitt signed this week, a far-reaching measure to protect well water from contamination by pesticides, industrial chemicals and other toxics. The new law recognizes the importance of ground water supplies as the major source of drinking water for the growing state.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gov. Pete Wilson is scheduled to meet with President Bush this morning in Nashville to urge him to veto landmark water legislation that would overhaul California's Central Valley Project, according to Republican sources. The meeting, which had been scheduled for the White House, had to be postponed after the President's political schedule kept him away from the capital during the campaign's hectic final weeks. Bush had been inclined to veto the CVP bill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1987
If the state Senate cannot debate relatively innocuous water legislation without a pitched battle, what will happen when the important bills come to the Senate floor? Simple: a revival of the old water wars that have bitterly divided Northern and Southern California for so many years. A truce is needed in the Legislature before the animosities become so intense that nothing constructive can emerge from the 1987 session.
NEWS
July 7, 1987 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Two Southern Californians, who recently provided key votes to win narrow passage in the Assembly of a major water bill, warned Monday that there is a "new coalition" of Southland legislators who no longer will march "lock-step" to approve water legislation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2009 | GEORGE SKELTON
Negotiators are on the brink of achieving the most comprehensive California water legislation in half a century. They're also in danger of an embarrassing belly flop. Both sides -- whether talking about Democrats vs. Republicans, environmentalists vs. farmers, cities vs. burgs -- have attained their top priorities, realizing gains that seemed almost impossible just 18 months ago. GOP lawmakers and San Joaquin Valley growers have secured a pathway leading to probable construction of a long-controversial canal to carry fresh Sacramento River water around the fragile, brackish delta and directly into an aqueduct heading south.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
The chances that Sacramento will break the stalemate on California water policy this summer grew dimmer Tuesday when Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said he would not sign legislation that didn't include bonds for new reservoirs and dams. The declaration signaled Schwarzenegger's dissatisfaction with a package of water bills Democrats are hoping to move through the Legislature before the mid-September adjournment. "I will not sign anything that does not have above-the-ground, below-the-ground water storage," the governor said at a news conference on the steps of the Capitol in Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2007 | From the Associated Press
SACRAMENTO -- The Schwarzenegger administration Wednesday dusted off a failed dam proposal as a way to shore up California water supplies in light of a federal judge's ruling limiting shipments from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. But it seemed doubtful that the Democrat-controlled Legislature -- long opposed to new dams -- would go along in the waning days of its 2007 session.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
The budget deadlock gripping the Capitol has put Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's policy agenda in jeopardy, with prospects for bringing healthcare to all Californians or solving the state's water problems dimming every day that lawmakers fail to pass a spending plan. The impasse has brought legislative business to a standstill -- from the governor's sweeping proposals to lawmakers' efforts to enhance the quality of life for family pets.
OPINION
August 1, 2007
Today, the House Judiciary Committee is expected to take up long-overdue legislation to require federal courts to join 33 states and the District of Columbia in recognizing a reporter's privilege to protect confidential sources. Supporters of the proposed Free Flow of Information Act are willing to fine-tune in response to criticism from the Bush administration, business groups and privacy advocates, but a bad bill would be worse than no bill at all.
OPINION
May 16, 1993 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a contributing editor to The Times
Irrepressible is the word for Maxine Waters. Making her way though the crowded bungalow in South-Central that serves as her congressional district office, she chats it up with gang members about a jobs program, college scholarship winners and "just some older folks." Then on to judge a Compton student art show. The day ends with a late dinner at a Santa Monica restaurant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2009 | GEORGE SKELTON
The California Legislature did something right, it would seem. So did Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Something huge and historic. The wiggle word "seem" is needed because the exact future of the sweeping water legislation passed at dawn Wednesday is far from certain. For starters, success will hinge on whether voters next November approve an $11.1-billion water bond issue. Last-minute sweeteners that fattened the bond size left ample opportunity for opponents to cry "too much pork."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
The budget deadlock gripping the Capitol has put Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's policy agenda in jeopardy, with prospects for bringing healthcare to all Californians or solving the state's water problems dimming every day that lawmakers fail to pass a spending plan. The impasse has brought legislative business to a standstill -- from the governor's sweeping proposals to lawmakers' efforts to enhance the quality of life for family pets.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Gov. Pete Wilson is scheduled to meet with President Bush this morning in Nashville to urge him to veto landmark water legislation that would overhaul California's Central Valley Project, according to Republican sources. The meeting, which had been scheduled for the White House, had to be postponed after the President's political schedule kept him away from the capital during the campaign's hectic final weeks. Bush had been inclined to veto the CVP bill.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|