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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
With workers poised to begin fluoridating drinking water in Los Angeles in the next two months, a half dozen San Fernando Valley residents protested Tuesday, citing health concerns. The Department of Water and Power plans to send notices to Los Angeles residents, letting them know that fluoridation will begin in late February, according to Darlene Battle, an agency spokeswoman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1988 | From United Press International
A state appeals court ruled in an opinion released Wednesday that the licenses of the city of Los Angeles to draw water from streams feeding Mono Lake must be reviewed by the state water board. The decision by the 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento shocked Los Angeles officials, who said the case probably will be appealed to the state Supreme Court.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Eight decades ago, as William Mulholland watched the first torrents of Owens River water cascade down to Los Angeles, the famed aqueduct builder uttered these words: "There it is. Take it." On Friday, the fish took some of it back. The rugged Owens River Gorge--rendered bone-dry for 40 years--sprang to life Friday morning with 10,000 tiny brown trout, a symbolic beginning of the end in the long, bitter saga of water disputes between Los Angeles and the distant Owens Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1994 | Research by JULIE SHEER / Los Angeles Times
Until the Los Angeles Aqueduct was completed in 1913, the arid San Fernando Valley had few options for obtaining water. Engineer William Mulholland masterminded the plan to bring water south from the Sierra Nevada, supplying water-starved Los Angeles but ruining fertile Owens Valley farmland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1987 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles City Council unanimously approved the city's first water rate increase in two years Tuesday, calling for a 5.3% increase for most residents. Mayor Tom Bradley is expected to approve the new rate, which would take effect Nov. 15. The average monthly residential bill will increase by 87 cents, from $17.33 to $18.20, based on 1,800 cubic feet of water used. Officials emphasized that the city's rates are substantially lower than many other California communities. A 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1990 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley's decision to impose water rationing this year was driven more by fear about supplies in 1991 than about any shortages this summer, city water officials and aides to the mayor said Thursday. According to city engineers, there is enough water to satisfy projected demands through the end of the year without any conservation, let alone rationing. The Department of Water and Power projects that the city will require about 710,000 acre-feet of water this year.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Central Valley farmers and some Northern California cities served by federal water projects are being told their deliveries will be cut by up to 50%, a move that could put some farmers out of business and lead to water rationing in urban areas, federal officials said Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1995
Thanks to an abundant snowmelt in the eastern Sierra, Los Angeles residents who use water wisely will receive an 8% decrease in water bills beginning July 1, the Department of Water and Power announced Tuesday. Gerald Gewe, the DWP's water resources manager, said that a typical customer who spent $45.67 for water in July and August last summer can expect to pay $39.12 during the same period this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1996 | EMI ENDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether fluoride is a convenient cavity-fighting tool or a toxic cancer-causing poison, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Commission took a step toward adding it to tap water Wednesday. The water board approved fluoridating the city's water, or adjusting the amount of fluoride present to a level considered optimal for preventing tooth decay. The water agency will present an implementation and financing plan to a City Council committee Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1988 | JUDY PASTERNAK, Times Staff Writer
In the Los Angeles value system, a water view ranks high, up there with a sleek, fast car and Laker season tickets. The beach people watch the water from the shore, with close-up vistas of breaking waves. The canyon people see it from the mountains, where the most prized panoramas include a patch of distant ocean blue. And while the reservoir people may have a less spectacular view, it affords them no less pleasure.
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