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NEWS
June 27, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If faith alone could cure, Ernie Cohen surely would be a healthy man. Afflicted with AIDS and diabetes, Cohen, 39, has taken all kinds of treatments--insulin, AZT, radiation, vitamins, herbs and acupuncture. Now he is turning to "miracle" water from a well belonging to a wealthy rancher who just happens to be named Jesus. "I know it works," said an earnest Cohen, picking at the quick of his bitten thumbnail. "Of course, a lot has to do with faith. I believe God has touched the water.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2012 | By Tony Perry and Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - After years of sporadic negotiations, U.S. and Mexican officials Tuesday are set to sign a major agreement aimed at improving binational cooperation over the Colorado River. Under the five-year deal, regional water agencies in Southern California, Arizona and Nevada will purchase a total of nearly 100,000 acre-feet of water from Mexico's share of the Colorado River - enough to cover the needs of 200,000 families for a year. In exchange, Mexico will receive $10 million to repair damage done to its irrigation canals by the magnitude 7.2 earthquake that struck the Mexicali Valley in 2010.
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NEWS
March 24, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Maria Isabella Gonzalez Portillo's Cucupa Indian forebears made a good living in the Colorado River delta, fishing, hunting and guiding in what was once the largest desert estuary on the North American continent. Today, Gonzalez Portillo is barely getting by--and, sadly, not because of the land. She makes $2 glass bead necklaces for sale to occasional visitors, while her husband drives a dump truck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2008 | H.G. Reza and Christopher Goffard, Times Staff Writers
When Jerry Colunga saw his 11-year-old son struggling in the water off Mal Paso, he rushed into the surf and started to swim toward him. The boy was 60 or 70 yards out, dog-paddling in surf that had suddenly grown ferocious. As he fought to reach his son, Colunga saw a fishing boat approach the boy, almost close enough, he thought, to rescue him. But a series of waves crashed into the boat and pitched it into the air. By the time the fishermen had pulled Colunga aboard, his only child -- Paul Maximiliano Gomez -- had disappeared.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hatched during the Nixon era, billed as a sure-fire technological fix to a problem that had strained the country's relations with Mexico to the breaking point. The trouble was the Colorado River. Fouled by agricultural runoff in the United States, the river had become so choked with salts that it was poisoning crops on Mexican farms near the end of its 1,400-mile run from the Rockies to the sea.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
A $3-million study will help determine if Mexico and the United States can collaborate on an aqueduct to transport Colorado River water to the growing populations of San Diego County and Tijuana. Members of the binational International Boundary and Water Commission signed an agreement Thursday to authorize the study, which is expected to take up to 18 months. The study will consider possible routes for an aqueduct and provide estimates of its cost.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governor of Baja California on Wednesday endorsed a proposal by utility agencies to build a massive desalination plant on the coast of Tijuana, saying the project would benefit Mexico by providing needed drinking water, electricity and natural gas. Gov. Ernesto Ruffo Appel said Mexico will join utility firms now studying building of the proposed plant, which would convert seawater into 100 million gallons of drinking water a day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2008 | H.G. Reza and Christopher Goffard, Times Staff Writers
When Jerry Colunga saw his 11-year-old son struggling in the water off Mal Paso, he rushed into the surf and started to swim toward him. The boy was 60 or 70 yards out, dog-paddling in surf that had suddenly grown ferocious. As he fought to reach his son, Colunga saw a fishing boat approach the boy, almost close enough, he thought, to rescue him. But a series of waves crashed into the boat and pitched it into the air. By the time the fishermen had pulled Colunga aboard, his only child -- Paul Maximiliano Gomez -- had disappeared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2012 | By Tony Perry and Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - After years of sporadic negotiations, U.S. and Mexican officials Tuesday are set to sign a major agreement aimed at improving binational cooperation over the Colorado River. Under the five-year deal, regional water agencies in Southern California, Arizona and Nevada will purchase a total of nearly 100,000 acre-feet of water from Mexico's share of the Colorado River - enough to cover the needs of 200,000 families for a year. In exchange, Mexico will receive $10 million to repair damage done to its irrigation canals by the magnitude 7.2 earthquake that struck the Mexicali Valley in 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
An advocacy group working to save endangered sea turtles unveiled a campaign Tuesday to discourage visitors to Baja California from eating the reptiles. The campaign coincides with the season of Lent, when the turtles -- which live on beaches and in the water off Mexico's Baja Peninsula -- are often eaten by visitors and residents who mistakenly consider the reptiles an acceptable substitute for meat during the religious period.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
A $3-million study will help determine if Mexico and the United States can collaborate on an aqueduct to transport Colorado River water to the growing populations of San Diego County and Tijuana. Members of the binational International Boundary and Water Commission signed an agreement Thursday to authorize the study, which is expected to take up to 18 months. The study will consider possible routes for an aqueduct and provide estimates of its cost.
NEWS
March 24, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Maria Isabella Gonzalez Portillo's Cucupa Indian forebears made a good living in the Colorado River delta, fishing, hunting and guiding in what was once the largest desert estuary on the North American continent. Today, Gonzalez Portillo is barely getting by--and, sadly, not because of the land. She makes $2 glass bead necklaces for sale to occasional visitors, while her husband drives a dump truck.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If faith alone could cure, Ernie Cohen surely would be a healthy man. Afflicted with AIDS and diabetes, Cohen, 39, has taken all kinds of treatments--insulin, AZT, radiation, vitamins, herbs and acupuncture. Now he is turning to "miracle" water from a well belonging to a wealthy rancher who just happens to be named Jesus. "I know it works," said an earnest Cohen, picking at the quick of his bitten thumbnail. "Of course, a lot has to do with faith. I believe God has touched the water.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was hatched during the Nixon era, billed as a sure-fire technological fix to a problem that had strained the country's relations with Mexico to the breaking point. The trouble was the Colorado River. Fouled by agricultural runoff in the United States, the river had become so choked with salts that it was poisoning crops on Mexican farms near the end of its 1,400-mile run from the Rockies to the sea.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governor of Baja California on Wednesday endorsed a proposal by utility agencies to build a massive desalination plant on the coast of Tijuana, saying the project would benefit Mexico by providing needed drinking water, electricity and natural gas. Gov. Ernesto Ruffo Appel said Mexico will join utility firms now studying building of the proposed plant, which would convert seawater into 100 million gallons of drinking water a day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2008 | Tony Perry, Perry is a Times staff writer.
On a rocky patch of desert, federal and state officials Tuesday began construction on a $172.2-million reservoir that will store water from the Colorado River that otherwise would be "lost" to Mexico. The reservoir will mean more water for coastal Southern California, southern Nevada and central Arizona -- where water agencies have agreed to split the cost.
WORLD
January 23, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY-- In a surprise 3-2 ruling Wednesday, the Mexican Supreme Court ordered the immediate release of Florence Cassez, a French citizen serving a 60-year prison sentence here after being convicted of involvement in a Mexican kidnapping ring. Cassez, 38, was arrested in 2005 along with her boyfriend, who authorities said was the head of a kidnapping group called the Zodiacs. Although she lived in a compound where victims were held, Cassez asserted that she was innocent. Her case was complicated by a number of irregularities on the part of Mexican authorities, including a staged replay of her arrest in front of television cameras.
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