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August 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
During the peak growing season, concentrations of herbicides in middle America's drinking water can soar to levels much higher than federal standards, says an environmental study released Thursday. The chemical industry and local water system officials say this does not necessarily mean the water is unsafe to drink. But the Environmental Protection Agency said the findings are cause for concern.
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NEWS
August 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
During the peak growing season, concentrations of herbicides in middle America's drinking water can soar to levels much higher than federal standards, says an environmental study released Thursday. The chemical industry and local water system officials say this does not necessarily mean the water is unsafe to drink. But the Environmental Protection Agency said the findings are cause for concern.
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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | J. DUNCAN MOORE Jr., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The mighty Missouri is full and flowing in its southern reaches, thanks to Mother Nature and the federal courts. While the northern portions of the Missouri basin--especially North and South Dakota--are hard hit by drought, the southern portions through Kansas and Missouri now have plenty of water for both irrigation and navigation. Storms and drought are unpredictable factors in that equation.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | J. DUNCAN MOORE Jr., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The mighty Missouri is full and flowing in its southern reaches, thanks to Mother Nature and the federal courts. While the northern portions of the Missouri basin--especially North and South Dakota--are hard hit by drought, the southern portions through Kansas and Missouri now have plenty of water for both irrigation and navigation. Storms and drought are unpredictable factors in that equation.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | LARRY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tiny, astoundingly prolific Eastern European shellfish has invaded the Great Lakes, permanently altering the fragile aquatic ecosystem and threatening a water supply that tens of millions of Americans and Canadians depend upon for drinking, electricity, industry and recreation. Zebra mussels--pinto bean-sized mollusks marked with brown and white zigzag stripes--are creating environmental havoc in the Midwest now.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | LARRY GREEN and TRACY SHRYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A four-year-long drought in the upper Midwest that has dried up streams and wetlands, cut into drinking water supplies for hundreds of thousands and left forests vulnerable to fire and disease shows no signs of abating, climatologists say. The drought, the region's worst since 1961, when an eight-year dry period ended, already is bad news for the Midwest's economy, wildlife and recreation, and "the odds suggest continuation of the . . .
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | LARRY GREEN and TRACY SHRYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A four-year-long drought in the upper Midwest that has dried up streams and wetlands, cut into drinking water supplies for hundreds of thousands and left forests vulnerable to fire and disease shows no signs of abating, climatologists say. The drought, the region's worst since 1961, when an eight-year dry period ended, already is bad news for the Midwest's economy, wildlife and recreation, and "the odds suggest continuation of the . . .
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | LARRY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tiny, astoundingly prolific Eastern European shellfish has invaded the Great Lakes, permanently altering the fragile aquatic ecosystem and threatening a water supply that tens of millions of Americans and Canadians depend upon for drinking, electricity, industry and recreation. Zebra mussels--pinto bean-sized mollusks marked with brown and white zigzag stripes--are creating environmental havoc in the Midwest now.
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