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NEWS
May 29, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The stacks of maps and aerial photographs on the table trace the course of the Rio de las Gallinas and its acequias--the winding irrigation ditches that divert water from the river and carry it to the fields and pastures that line its banks. David Benavides picks up one of the glossy black-and-white enlargements and peers at it, turning it first one way and then another. He's having trouble reading the landscape as it appears from 10,000 feet.
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NEWS
March 9, 1993 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A dozen miles south of this city of 400,000 people, the Pueblo of Isleta sits on a bend in the Rio Grande amid groves of sinuous cottonwood trees, a quiet reminder of an ancient way of life. Pueblo residents divert some of the river's muddy brown waters to irrigate their fields. At certain times of the year, they also drink river water in traditional religious ceremonies.
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NEWS
March 9, 1993 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A dozen miles south of this city of 400,000 people, the Pueblo of Isleta sits on a bend in the Rio Grande amid groves of sinuous cottonwood trees, a quiet reminder of an ancient way of life. Pueblo residents divert some of the river's muddy brown waters to irrigate their fields. At certain times of the year, they also drink river water in traditional religious ceremonies.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The stacks of maps and aerial photographs on the table trace the course of the Rio de las Gallinas and its acequias--the winding irrigation ditches that divert water from the river and carry it to the fields and pastures that line its banks. David Benavides picks up one of the glossy black-and-white enlargements and peers at it, turning it first one way and then another. He's having trouble reading the landscape as it appears from 10,000 feet.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal agencies, fishing enthusiasts, environmentalists and several Indian tribes are at loggerheads over a plan to build a massive river-diversion project in northwestern New Mexico while seeking to save the endangered Colorado squawfish from extinction. Unless a compromise can be worked out to preserve the water rights of the various groups involved, any move to break ground on the Animas-La Plata Irrigation Project will likely lead to a lawsuit, according to those familiar with the dispute.
BOOKS
May 1, 1988 | William Kahrl, Kahrl is the editor of "The California Water Atlas" (William Kaufmann Inc.) and author of " Water and Power " (University of California Press). and
Despite the extraordinary physical beauty of its setting, the story that Ira Clark has to tell in this massively detailed history of New Mexico is largely one of communities struggling to overcome the economic poverty of their land and water resources. It's a curiously shut-ended kind of struggle--a process of self-cannibalization really.
OPINION
August 4, 2002
California, Teddy Roosevelt once said, is west of the West, and most years that description holds true, at least for the part of the state west of the Sierra Nevada. To find the iconic American West, arid and empty, a coastal Californian typically heads east, leaving the Pacific behind to reach an ocean of sagebrush. But this parched summer, the distance between Southern California and its Southwestern neighbors seems much shorter.
MAGAZINE
November 7, 1993 | Margaret L. Knox, Margaret L. Knox lives in Missoula, Mont., and writes frequently about the environment and Indian politics for Mother Jones, the Smithsonian and Sierra. The Fund for Constitutional Government provided support for her research
Delbert Palmer is rumbling his muddy, red Nissan across a stubble alfalfa field on what most people call the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana. Palmer prefers to call it the "former" Flathead Reservation and this piece of it, just plain "my" land--240 undulating acres his Dutch-English parents bought from homesteaders in 1943. Nothing unusual about Palmer: he is one of 16,000 whites who live on this reservation, one of half a million who own property on Indian reservations nationwide.
OPINION
February 17, 2003 | Roger G. Kennedy, Roger G. Kennedy, a New Mexico resident, is director emeritus of the National Museum of American History, former director of the U.S. National Park Service and author of "Mr. Jefferson's Lost Cause" (Oxford University Press, 2003).
A recent spate of newspaper articles about the shortage of water in New Mexico and southern Colorado has presented it as a case of people against minnows. This is nonsense. The problem, in the short term, is one of misuse of water in a dry climate, and about the unwillingness of politicians to stop that misuse by powerful interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1998 | CHRIS ROBERTS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bees that pollinate Dan Field's watermelon plants normally slake their thirst on morning dew. This year, ranch hands had to haul water so the bees wouldn't die. It's been a dry year in Lea County, but the county's water problems run deeper than the six-month drought. Some believe the water woes could ruin businesses and turn the county's cities into ghost towns. No rivers wind through Lea County, which has a population of more than 65,700.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal agencies, fishing enthusiasts, environmentalists and several Indian tribes are at loggerheads over a plan to build a massive river-diversion project in northwestern New Mexico while seeking to save the endangered Colorado squawfish from extinction. Unless a compromise can be worked out to preserve the water rights of the various groups involved, any move to break ground on the Animas-La Plata Irrigation Project will likely lead to a lawsuit, according to those familiar with the dispute.
BOOKS
May 1, 1988 | William Kahrl, Kahrl is the editor of "The California Water Atlas" (William Kaufmann Inc.) and author of " Water and Power " (University of California Press). and
Despite the extraordinary physical beauty of its setting, the story that Ira Clark has to tell in this massively detailed history of New Mexico is largely one of communities struggling to overcome the economic poverty of their land and water resources. It's a curiously shut-ended kind of struggle--a process of self-cannibalization really.
NATIONAL
May 20, 2002 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Garcia's pickup crunched to a stop in the dust at the side of the gravel road. Hanging a leathery arm out his truck window, he gazed at a ribbon of water gurgling through the nearby ditch. Garcia grunted in disgust. What should have been a torrent of spring runoff water was instead a modest flow. Not enough, Garcia knew, not nearly enough, to sate the thirst of the farmers and ranchers in the Valdez Valley. Not this summer.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2003 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
After five years of distressingly low rain and snowfall, a drought is hammering the West harder than ever, causing multibillion-dollar economic losses and prompting unprecedented measures in many states to cope with less water. With the start of winter, little optimism exists that the coming months will fix the problems. Weather forecasts are equivocal.
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