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Water Pollution California

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NEWS
March 1, 1987 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Along the scenic Russian River, where mellow practically was invented, about the only time folks find time to worry nowadays is when it rains. And when it doesn't. The problem isn't so much the floods that seem to regularly wash over Monte Rio, Guerneville and other quaint towns in this redwood-and-whitewater resort area 60 miles north of San Francisco. The real problem is with the City of Santa Rosa--and its sewage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed sale of water from water-rich Imperial County to arid San Diego County, considered a key to the state's efforts to avoid a devastating cutback of how much it can take from the Colorado River, has hit a serious snag involving money and environmental concerns. The problem centers on complex and controversial efforts to devise a politically and scientifically acceptable plan to clean up the ailing Salton Sea, which straddles Imperial and Riverside counties.
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NEWS
November 28, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials at the U.S. Marine Corps Logistics Base near Barstow illegally dumped barrels of hazardous waste at two landfills not licensed or equipped to accept such material, state and county environmental authorities charged Monday. At least 33 drums of allegedly toxic sandblasting waste were dumped at San Bernardino County's landfill in Barstow in early 1989, and an unknown but far greater number were buried at a base dump in nearby Yermo in previous years, investigators alleged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The release of 150,000 gallons of chlorinated water into the San Joaquin River earlier this month was caused by human error, Manteca officials reported to state water quality officials. Chlorinated waste water began flowing from the city pipeline after a tank holding a chemical that neutralizes the chlorine before it is pumped into the river ran dry, the city's report says. An alarm used to warn when the tank was empty apparently had not been activated.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When state wildlife officials poisoned Lake Davis nearly six months ago to rid the pristine trout habitat of a predatory fish called the northern pike, they promised that the effects would be short-lived. They promised that the lake--this tiny Eastern Sierra city's primary drinking water supply--would be chemical-free, back on tap and restocked with trout before it iced over for the winter.
NEWS
July 22, 1987 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
With 14 toxic waste dumps considered serious threats to public health, California leads a list of 99 additional Superfund priority cleanup sites released Tuesday. But final cleanup of the state's new Superfund sites--plus 34 already on the list--could be a decade or more away, officials said. The Environmental Protection Agency has cleanup work under way at about half of the 800-plus sites currently on the Superfund list, including 17 in California. But despite $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed sale of water from water-rich Imperial County to arid San Diego County, considered a key to the state's efforts to avoid a devastating cutback of how much it can take from the Colorado River, has hit a serious snag involving money and environmental concerns. The problem centers on complex and controversial efforts to devise a politically and scientifically acceptable plan to clean up the ailing Salton Sea, which straddles Imperial and Riverside counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The tap water of at least 7 million Californians is contaminated with a chemical from rocket fuel, according to an environmental group's study. After collecting data from federal and local agencies, the Environmental Working Group found that perchlorate, a chemical that affects the thyroid, has tainted wells and river water that feeds California, and contends that suggested acceptable levels are far above where they should be.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it came to a House vote last Friday on curbing the powers of the Environmental Protection Agency, California Rep. Calvin Dooley lined up with the environmentalists and helped hand them a stunning victory. By Friday night, his phone was ringing. By Monday morning, he had changed his mind. When it was all over, the Republicans had reversed a humiliating defeat.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
PUC Fines Railroad for Dunsmuir, Seacliff Spills: Southern Pacific must pay $492,000 for violations of the state's hazardous material reporting rules. The California Public Utilities Commission also set new train make-up and safety regulations for Cantara Curve near Dunsmuir, where the 1991 derailment occurred. In that accident, 14,000 gallons of herbicide went into the Sacramento River, killing all plant and animal life for 45 miles downstream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The tap water of at least 7 million Californians is contaminated with a chemical from rocket fuel, according to an environmental group's study. After collecting data from federal and local agencies, the Environmental Working Group found that perchlorate, a chemical that affects the thyroid, has tainted wells and river water that feeds California, and contends that suggested acceptable levels are far above where they should be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2001 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by what she called the slow response of state health officials to a suspected carcinogen, state Sen. Deborah Ortiz (D-Sacramento) said she will introduce legislation today calling for a separate standard to limit chromium 6 in California's drinking water. SB 351, co-sponsored by State Sens.
NEWS
November 11, 2000 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For their entire lives in a German laboratory, 101 lab mice lapped up water containing extraordinary amounts of a metallic compound. It was 1968, and scientists were trying to figure out whether chromium--widely used in industrial paints and plating materials--was dangerous in drinking water. Two of the mice developed stomach tumors so big that the mounds protruded from their bellies. All the others remained healthy.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
California's new plan for limiting toxic pollutants in rivers, bays and other waterways has "gaping loopholes" and should be rescinded, a coalition of environmental groups charged in a lawsuit filed against the state water board. The long-awaited plan, adopted two months ago, provides instructions for how the state will regulate industries and public sewage-treatment plants that discharge 126 toxic compounds, including mercury, dioxins and pesticides.
NEWS
December 15, 1999 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attacking the state's most insidious water pollution problem, state regulators pushed ahead with a sweeping effort Tuesday to clean up the urban runoff that has tainted California's coastline for decades. The State Water Resources Control Board voted unanimously to approve a 61-point battle plan that could rival the ongoing regulatory fight against smog in Southern California.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling for tougher regulations of pesticides, a public interest group says government data show the levels of some chemicals found in California drinking water sources exceed health guidelines. "The detections are not an indication that people are at a serious health risk," said Brad Heavner, author of a report on pesticides for the California Public Interest Research Group (CALPIRG).
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following up on their unusual 30-minute television commercial, supporters of Proposition 128--a sweeping environmental initiative--unveiled a more conventional advertisement Wednesday that conveys the campaign's message in a mere 30 seconds. The new ad for the initiative--dubbed "Big Green" by its supporters--features footage of a 4-year-old boy to highlight the ill effects of pesticides, toxic waste and water pollution on children. It began a one-week, $250,000 statewide run Wednesday night.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
No contaminants have been found in water samples taken from five wells in the San Joaquin Valley town of Earlimart where six childhood cancers, all involving Latino children, are being investigated, health officials have reported. Results of state testing of the community's five wells were relayed to the Town Council last week, said Jay Johnson, Tulare County environmental health specialist. "It sure was some positive news," Johnson said.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's coastal counties must increase their testing for ocean pollution and probably will post more warning signs near contaminated waters under regulations given final approval this week. The rules take effect nearly two years after the Legislature approved the plan that provides counties with uniform rules for measuring ocean water quality.
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