Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWater Pollution California
IN THE NEWS

Water Pollution California

NEWS
May 7, 1999 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as Gov. Gray Davis was declaring MTBE an environmental hazard and ordering it phased out of gasoline, two oil companies were increasing amounts of the controversial additive in gas sold in Northern California. Officials at Chevron Corp. and Tosco Corp. confirmed the boost in MTBE, saying it was necessary to stretch their gasoline supply after refinery fires and marketplace factors reduced production.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California authorities have failed to act quickly and decisively to combat threats to drinking water from the gasoline additive MTBE, a state auditor's report released Friday says. The report is the latest in a series of warnings about the additive, which has fouled some drinking water wells, including several in Santa Monica, and threatens many more in California. The report is expected to give added momentum to efforts by environmentalists and others who want to remove MTBE from gasoline.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
MTBE, the controversial gasoline additive that has contaminated ground water throughout the state, does little if anything to clean the air and should be phased out within six years, University of California researchers have concluded. The study, commissioned 10 months ago by the Legislature and governor's office, was designed to help California officials decide whether to ban the oxygenate, which refineries add to fuel to boost octane and decrease carbon monoxide emissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1998
Rock formations, not air pollution or clear-cutting of forests, are the source of excess nitrates in some California waterways, UC Davis researchers report in today's Nature. Nitrates cause massive algal blooms that use up dissolved oxygen and lead to fish kills. Biogeochemists Randy Dahlgren and JoAnn Holloway studied 40 miles of watershed along the Mokelumne River from Kirkwood to Jackson in the Sierra Nevada.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | From Associated Press
Nearly 2 million gallons of cow waste were illegally dumped from a Nevada dairy, snaking eight miles into a national park and river in California, according to an indictment Thursday. "As far as I know, it's the biggest dairy waste spill in the western United States," said Assistant U.S. Atty. Richard J. Cutler, lead prosecutor in the case. Court papers show that 1.
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny, rural Plumas County took the unusual step this week of filing criminal charges against the state Department of Fish and Game, alleging that agency officials broke the law when they poisoned Lake Davis to get rid of the notorious northern pike. The chemical offensive in October garnered national attention and created a local furor that continues to burn.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Louie Pratt can stand on any corner, gaze out on the horizon in any direction and see cows. They are everywhere, but more important, so is their most abundant byproduct. Not milk. Manure. In California, the nation's largest milk producer, cows spew as much waste as every man, woman and child. But unlike the massive network for purifying human sewage, there are no toilets, no sewers, no treatment plants for farm animals.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When state wildlife officials poisoned Lake Davis nearly six months ago to rid the pristine trout habitat of a predatory fish called the northern pike, they promised that the effects would be short-lived. They promised that the lake--this tiny Eastern Sierra city's primary drinking water supply--would be chemical-free, back on tap and restocked with trout before it iced over for the winter.
NEWS
March 19, 1998 | GEORGE SKELTON
There was a big water story here Monday--"a big deal," in the words of Felicia Marcus, regional administrator for the federal EPA. And right away you can see one of the problems, why this is not just big in importance, but big in complexity and convolution. Any discussion invariably begins with bureaucratic lingo: EPA. CalFed. Isolated facility. Isolated facility? Sounds like a prison in the boonies, rather than what it is: The water bureaucracy's attempt to avoid the "P" word.
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cruel twist in the battle to clean the environment, promoters of MTBE, a major additive in what officials call California's cleaner burning gasoline, are finding that the ingredient itself is on trial. Clean air experts are convinced that reformulated gasoline containing the additive has brought about significant smog reductions in the state with the nation's worst air quality. But it may be a carcinogen, and it threatens to foul drinking water.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|