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Water Pollution California

NEWS
May 7, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny, rural Plumas County took the unusual step this week of filing criminal charges against the state Department of Fish and Game, alleging that agency officials broke the law when they poisoned Lake Davis to get rid of the notorious northern pike. The chemical offensive in October garnered national attention and created a local furor that continues to burn.
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NEWS
April 28, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Louie Pratt can stand on any corner, gaze out on the horizon in any direction and see cows. They are everywhere, but more important, so is their most abundant byproduct. Not milk. Manure. In California, the nation's largest milk producer, cows spew as much waste as every man, woman and child. But unlike the massive network for purifying human sewage, there are no toilets, no sewers, no treatment plants for farm animals.
NEWS
March 19, 1998 | GEORGE SKELTON
There was a big water story here Monday--"a big deal," in the words of Felicia Marcus, regional administrator for the federal EPA. And right away you can see one of the problems, why this is not just big in importance, but big in complexity and convolution. Any discussion invariably begins with bureaucratic lingo: EPA. CalFed. Isolated facility. Isolated facility? Sounds like a prison in the boonies, rather than what it is: The water bureaucracy's attempt to avoid the "P" word.
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cruel twist in the battle to clean the environment, promoters of MTBE, a major additive in what officials call California's cleaner burning gasoline, are finding that the ingredient itself is on trial. Clean air experts are convinced that reformulated gasoline containing the additive has brought about significant smog reductions in the state with the nation's worst air quality. But it may be a carcinogen, and it threatens to foul drinking water.
NEWS
December 10, 1996 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In its first examination of Proposition 65, the 1986 anti-toxics initiative, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday that the state may prohibit the discharge of lead and other toxic chemicals into faucet water. Giving a victory to environmentalists who inspired the measure, the court said it should be broadly interpreted to protect public health, a ruling that will make it more difficult for companies to circumvent the wide-ranging law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1996
Urban runoff lured Julia Louise-Dreyfus early Wednesday to the Hard Rock Cafe in West Hollywood, where the "Seinfeld" co-star hosted a continental breakfast on behalf of a controversial plan to manage the debris draining into the Pacific Ocean. Appearing in support were Ed Begley Jr., Donna Mills and Theresa Randall. Warren Littlefield of NBC Entertainment, Hard Rock owner Peter Morton, Castle Rock's Alan Horn and Norma Lear came, too. So did members of Heal the Bay, Environmental Media Assn.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it came to a House vote last Friday on curbing the powers of the Environmental Protection Agency, California Rep. Calvin Dooley lined up with the environmentalists and helped hand them a stunning victory. By Friday night, his phone was ringing. By Monday morning, he had changed his mind. When it was all over, the Republicans had reversed a humiliating defeat.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Price Pfister Inc., a major plumbing-supplies maker in Pacoima, is apparently hurting from publicity surrounding the lead that its faucets leave in drinking water. Last month the state attorney general filed suit against Price Pfister, and more than 20 other major faucet companies, for selling products that leach too much lead into water. The suit is intended to force manufacturers to stop selling these faucets, or substantially reduce the lead in their products.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was to be the season Lindsay snapped back from the 1990 freeze that ravaged crops. The oranges and olives bloomed abundantly. The packinghouses and canneries hummed again. Then this Central Valley town's third-largest employer, General Cable, shut down. And on Sept. 18, the eve of the olive harvest, Lindsay was hit with the worst news of all. Lindsay Olive, founded in 1916 and once the world's largest olive processor--the company in this company town--had pulled the plug for good.
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