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Water Pollution Control

REAL ESTATE
September 1, 1985
California sewer construction in the first six months of this year amounted to $392 million, nearly double the $199 million spent in all of 1984. Robert Kruse, president of the Associated General Contractors of California, announced the increase and commented: "We're pleased to see California start to rebuild one element of its infrastructure."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1987
The 10 largest conventions in Los Angeles, as listed by the Greater Los Angeles Visitors and Convention Bureau.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1986
Two Swiss-born scientists Friday were named winners of the 1986 Tyler Prize for their work to control pollution of lakes in the United States, Switzerland and other parts of the world. Chemist Werner Stumm, the "conscience of the Swiss lakes," and biologist Richard A. Vollenweider, who led the way for reversal of pollution in the Great Lakes, each will receive $75,000 and a gold medallion during a formal dinner ceremony tonight at Chasen's in Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 12, 1990
Items for People in the News may be mailed to 1333 Mayflower Ave., Suite 200, Monrovia, 91016. Alison D. Sowden, a certified public accountant, has been named chief financial officer of the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. Sowden previously was director of personnel and administrative services at the J. Paul Getty Museum. * John T. Morris of San Marino has been named that city's representative on the Metropolitan Water District's board of directors.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | EMILY ADAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sauntering across the dirty sidewalk, the woman with the short skirt and purple spike-heeled pumps approached a waiting car. She leaned into the open window, shifting her weight from one foot to the other, her skirt twitching toward the traffic on Pacific Coast Highway. She slipped into the passenger seat, apparently unaware of the glaring disapproval of two people watching a few feet away. They made her take notice.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move bound to increase squalling over disposable versus cloth diapers, an Arizona company has announced plans to manufacture a flushable disposable plastic diaper. RMED International, a Sedona, Ariz., distributor of TenderCare disposable diapers to such retailers as Mrs. Gooch's health food supermarkets, plans to have its diaper-making machine in place and to produce almost 100,000 a day by May.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Wilson Administration has unveiled the first details of its plan to create a California Environmental Protection Agency, which would regulate air and water pollution, control garbage and toxic waste disposal, and evaluate threats to the environment. The proposal calls for placing a number of existing state environmental programs under a single agency, headed by a Cabinet-level secretary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1990 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An estimated 150,000 to 300,000 gallons a day of treated sewage has been leaking from the Encina Water Pollution Control Facility's ocean discharge pipeline in Carlsbad, officials said Wednesday. However, testing indicates there has been no environmental hazard from the leak, they said, which was discovered 5,500 feet offshore on Nov. 8 during an inspection of the 7,800-foot pipeline. Treated sewage from Carlsbad, Vista, Encinitas and San Marcos is discharged from the pipeline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Richard Winton
The upper torso of a woman found Monday in a San Gabriel Valley water treatment plant is believed to match a pelvis and legs found 30 miles away at another sanitation plant, sheriff's detectives said. Detectives are treating the woman's death as a homicide, said Lt. Mike Rosson of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Authorities believe the body entered the sanitation system somewhere in the San Gabriel Valley. Investigators recovered more body parts Monday afternoon but were still trying to locate a missing arm of the woman, who they believe is Latina.
NEWS
February 2, 1994 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, grappling with what it called "the hard part" of water pollution control, on Tuesday unveiled a series of initiatives designed to improve the quality of the nation's waterways. In its broadest terms, the plan would streamline regulations, increase federal funds available to towns and cities and reduce the use of some toxic pollutants, such as chlorine, by American industry.
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