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Water Pollution Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anheuser-Busch, which late Wednesday dumped thousands of gallons of water into Haskell Creek, again flooded the stream bed Thursday night in a continuing effort to flush away residue of a caustic solution that spilled from its Van Nuys brewery earlier in the week and threatened to contaminate the Sepulveda Basin wildlife area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1992
Charges were filed Monday against a San Pedro company in connection with a gasoline spill in Los Angeles Harbor last year. The city attorney's office charged Western Fuel Oil Co. with illegally discharging a petroleum product into state waters. The charge, arising from the state Fish and Game Code, carries a maximum penalty of a $2,000 fine. On April 23, a pipeline ruptured at Western's facility and 9,240 gallons of unleaded gasoline flowed into the harbor. The cleanup took more than two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991 | SHAWN DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It took cigar-chomping dreamer Abbot Kinney just one year early in the century to construct an American Venice--complete with amusement parks, canals and imported gondoliers--in a swamp on the edge of the Pacific Ocean. But it has taken the people who live in Kinney's community three decades to come up with a plan for saving what's left of those canals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1991
Two misdemeanor charges were filed Tuesday against the owner of an Argentine cargo ship that spilled 88 gallons of fuel into Los Angeles Harbor last April. The charges against Maruba S.C.A., the company that owns the cargo ship Centurian, mark the first local use of the state's year-old Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act, Deputy City Atty. Don Kass said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1991
A Sun Valley plant that processes industrial X-rays was cited on Monday for dumping a silver-tainted waste solution into a surface drain instead of treating the substance as a hazardous material, officials said. L.A. X-Ray, 10942 Tuxford St., was ordered to comply with state regulations and implement an accepted method of hazardous-waste disposal, said Mike Lohnes, a hazardous materials specialist for the Los Angeles County Fire Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Test results announced Friday revealed for the first time that low-level radioactive pollution has seeped into ground water near Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory, contrary to past assurances that nuclear operations at the site west of Chatsworth had no impact on ground water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1991 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Determined to boost its share of the booming Pacific Rim trade, the Port of Los Angeles is aggressively building for the future. In the process, it finds itself grappling with the pollution of the past. Consider the harbor's newest addition, a 100-acre shipping cargo facility nearing completion on Terminal Island. The port allowed a former leaseholder, a scrap business, to leave the site before the full extent of pollution on the port-owned property was known.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed expansion of the Sunshine Canyon landfill moved a step closer to final approval Monday when state water officials declared that enlarging the dump will not harm local water supplies. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board voted 8 to 0 to issue a permit allowing the dump operator, Browning-Ferris Industries, to expand the site into 215 acres just across the Los Angeles city line from the present landfill north of Sylmar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1991 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 1,000 dead fish floated to the surface of the Los Angeles River in the Sepulveda Dam area, apparently killed by a mysterious brown substance illegally dumped in the water, and Los Angeles city officials worry that some people may be harvesting them to eat. "We're concerned because some of our lab workers spotted people picking up the dead fish and taking them with them," Anna Sklar, spokeswoman for the Bureau of Sanitation, said Thursday.
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