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Water Pollution Nevada

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NEWS
November 19, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Disturbing new evidence that chemical pollution can deform reproductive systems has turned up in fish in Lake Mead, one of the nation's most popular recreation spots and a major source of drinking water for Las Vegas and Southern California.
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NEWS
July 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
An agreement on a new cleanup at an abandoned Sierra sulfur mine that has polluted nearby streams for years was announced Thursday by the federal Environmental Protection Agency. Keith Takata, head of the EPA's Superfund program for the Pacific Southwest, said his agency reached the Leviathan Mine agreement with California's Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board.
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NEWS
July 23, 1988 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Agricultural drain water from large-scale farming near Fallon, Nev., is so toxic that it kills both freshwater fish and invertebrates commonly found in the nearby Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, a preliminary U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service study has found. The finding was widely viewed Friday as an early signal that the ecological health of the 164,000-acre wildlife refuge 60 miles east of Reno could be in jeopardy.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Disturbing new evidence that chemical pollution can deform reproductive systems has turned up in fish in Lake Mead, one of the nation's most popular recreation spots and a major source of drinking water for Las Vegas and Southern California.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
An agreement on a new cleanup at an abandoned Sierra sulfur mine that has polluted nearby streams for years was announced Thursday by the federal Environmental Protection Agency. Keith Takata, head of the EPA's Superfund program for the Pacific Southwest, said his agency reached the Leviathan Mine agreement with California's Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The states of California and Arizona are expected to challenge a plan by Clark County, Nev., to discharge treated sewer water into the Colorado River at Laughlin, Nev. Arizona officials have already requested a public hearing on the plan. Arizona's water-quality plan discourages the discharge of treated sewer water into the river while Nevada's plan does not.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
Despite the growing body of evidence suggesting that a global environmental catastrophe is no longer in the realm of science fiction, the Bush Administration continues to bury its collective head in the sand. Instead of demonstrating some responsible leadership, the United States continues to block any meaningful progress toward balancing development pressures with environmental constraints.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Biologists have tentatively blamed the deaths of an estimated 7 million fish at the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area in northern Nevada on high salt levels in the nature refuge's waters, a Nevada Wildlife Department spokesman said Thursday. "I don't think that there's any doubt that they're (the fish) dying because of salinity levels," said spokesman David Rice, who added that unless the situation is reversed, the wildlife refuge faces "doom."
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the West's latest boom town. Seemingly overnight, Laughlin has metamorphosed from an unremarkable blip on the Colorado River to a thriving tourist mecca teeming with gamblers. Only trouble is, visitors leave more than dollars behind when they hop in the RV and head for home; they also leave sewage. And if the high rollers are to continue answering nature's call between blackjack hands, a way must be found to dispose of the mounting volume of waste.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
Despite the growing body of evidence suggesting that a global environmental catastrophe is no longer in the realm of science fiction, the Bush Administration continues to bury its collective head in the sand. Instead of demonstrating some responsible leadership, the United States continues to block any meaningful progress toward balancing development pressures with environmental constraints.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the West's latest boom town. Seemingly overnight, Laughlin has metamorphosed from an unremarkable blip on the Colorado River to a thriving tourist mecca teeming with gamblers. Only trouble is, visitors leave more than dollars behind when they hop in the RV and head for home; they also leave sewage. And if the high rollers are to continue answering nature's call between blackjack hands, a way must be found to dispose of the mounting volume of waste.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The states of California and Arizona are expected to challenge a plan by Clark County, Nev., to discharge treated sewer water into the Colorado River at Laughlin, Nev. Arizona officials have already requested a public hearing on the plan. Arizona's water-quality plan discourages the discharge of treated sewer water into the river while Nevada's plan does not.
NEWS
July 23, 1988 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Agricultural drain water from large-scale farming near Fallon, Nev., is so toxic that it kills both freshwater fish and invertebrates commonly found in the nearby Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, a preliminary U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service study has found. The finding was widely viewed Friday as an early signal that the ecological health of the 164,000-acre wildlife refuge 60 miles east of Reno could be in jeopardy.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Biologists have tentatively blamed the deaths of an estimated 7 million fish at the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area in northern Nevada on high salt levels in the nature refuge's waters, a Nevada Wildlife Department spokesman said Thursday. "I don't think that there's any doubt that they're (the fish) dying because of salinity levels," said spokesman David Rice, who added that unless the situation is reversed, the wildlife refuge faces "doom."
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