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Water Pollution Riverside County

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April 1, 1989 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
As many as 2,000 bottles of drinking water from an Irvine-based bottled-water company were removed from store shelves as company and state health officials continued Friday to test the product for potentially lethal levels of sodium fluoride, authorities said. Niagara Drinking Water Inc.
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NEWS
April 10, 1993 | Associated Press
Spring runoff brewed up another toxic waste leak at the Stringfellow acid pits, prompting officials to close the dump and cancel a Friday tour by jurors hearing a damage suit against its users. Work crews wearing respirators plugged an initial leak Wednesday. It was the third since rainfall saturated the 20-acre dump and surrounding hills two months ago.
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NEWS
March 25, 1993 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A winter oil spill in the Prado Dam reservoir fouled as many as 900 acres of wildlife habitat, including nesting grounds for an endangered bird, and could eventually cost Orange County water users as much as $2 million a year, officials said Wednesday. The spill has thrown a wrench into the Orange County Water District's plans to annually harvest more than 3 billion gallons of reservoir water for local homes and businesses, according to water district general manager William R. Mills.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A winter oil spill in the Prado Dam reservoir fouled as many as 900 acres of wildlife habitat, including nesting grounds for an endangered bird, and could eventually cost Orange County water users as much as $2 million a year, officials said Wednesday. The spill has thrown a wrench into the Orange County Water District's plans to annually harvest more than 3 billion gallons of reservoir water for local homes and businesses, according to water district general manager William R. Mills.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tribal officials on the Pechanga Indian Reservation near Temecula have filed a lawsuit to block a water district's plan to pump treated sewage into the area's underground aquifer. The suit, filed by the Temecula Band of Luiseno Mission Indians in Riverside County Superior Court, charges that the Rancho California Water District violated state environmental laws by approving the sewage project without adequately assessing its impact.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning an important new phase in the cleanup of California's most notorious toxic waste site, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to extract and treat contaminated ground water migrating from the Stringfellow Acid Pits.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | Associated Press
Spring runoff brewed up another toxic waste leak at the Stringfellow acid pits, prompting officials to close the dump and cancel a Friday tour by jurors hearing a damage suit against its users. Work crews wearing respirators plugged an initial leak Wednesday. It was the third since rainfall saturated the 20-acre dump and surrounding hills two months ago.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contaminants from sewage and cow manure are migrating rapidly through the ground water supply of western Riverside and San Bernardino counties, threatening to make water in nearly half of the region's subterranean basins undrinkable within 25 years, a new study shows. Preliminary results of the $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Addressing one of the most complex legal dilemmas ever to confront the federal Superfund program, a federal judge in Los Angeles has held 13 companies that dumped or transported hazardous wastes to the Stringfellow Acid Pits liable for cleanup costs that could approach $100 million. In a ruling issued late Thursday, U.S. District Judge James M.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
As many as 2,000 bottles of drinking water from an Irvine-based bottled water company were removed from store shelves as company and state health officials continued Friday to test the product for potentially lethal levels of sodium fluoride, authorities said. Niagara Drinking Waters Inc.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning an important new phase in the cleanup of California's most notorious toxic waste site, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to extract and treat contaminated ground water migrating from the Stringfellow Acid Pits.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contaminants from sewage and cow manure are migrating rapidly through the ground water supply of western Riverside and San Bernardino counties, threatening to make water in nearly half of the region's subterranean basins undrinkable within 25 years, a new study shows. Preliminary results of the $1.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tribal officials on the Pechanga Indian Reservation near Temecula have filed a lawsuit to block a water district's plan to pump treated sewage into the area's underground aquifer. The suit, filed by the Temecula Band of Luiseno Mission Indians in Riverside County Superior Court, charges that the Rancho California Water District violated state environmental laws by approving the sewage project without adequately assessing its impact.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
As many as 2,000 bottles of drinking water from an Irvine-based bottled water company were removed from store shelves as company and state health officials continued Friday to test the product for potentially lethal levels of sodium fluoride, authorities said. Niagara Drinking Waters Inc.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1989 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
As many as 2,000 bottles of drinking water from an Irvine-based bottled-water company were removed from store shelves as company and state health officials continued Friday to test the product for potentially lethal levels of sodium fluoride, authorities said. Niagara Drinking Water Inc.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | From Associated Press
Potentially fatal levels of sodium fluoride found in a Niagara brand water bottle purchased in Riverside County prompted the state Department of Health Services to issue a public warning Thursday and the company began a four-county recall. "Two families have reported a total of four illnesses, which may be attributable to consumption of the contaminated water," state Health Director Kenneth W. Kizer said.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | From Associated Press
Sixteen companies that dumped nearly 24 million gallons of cancer-causing chemicals at the Stringfellow Acid Pits near Riverside have agreed to pay $6 million of cleanup costs that could go as high as $880 million, regulators said. The agreement comes 16 years after the dump closed and after nearly two years of talks between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, state health officials, representatives of the 16 companies and the former dump operator. The 16 companies are Rohr, Alumax Inc.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | From Associated Press
Potentially fatal levels of sodium fluoride found in a Niagara brand water bottle purchased in Riverside County prompted the state Department of Health Services to issue a public warning Thursday and the company began a four-county recall. "Two families have reported a total of four illnesses, which may be attributable to consumption of the contaminated water," state Health Director Kenneth W. Kizer said.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | From Associated Press
Sixteen companies that dumped nearly 24 million gallons of cancer-causing chemicals at the Stringfellow Acid Pits near Riverside have agreed to pay $6 million of cleanup costs that could go as high as $880 million, regulators said. The agreement comes 16 years after the dump closed and after nearly two years of talks between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, state health officials, representatives of the 16 companies and the former dump operator. The 16 companies are Rohr, Alumax Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Addressing one of the most complex legal dilemmas ever to confront the federal Superfund program, a federal judge in Los Angeles has held 13 companies that dumped or transported hazardous wastes to the Stringfellow Acid Pits liable for cleanup costs that could approach $100 million. In a ruling issued late Thursday, U.S. District Judge James M.
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