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Water Purification

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NEWS
May 22, 1986
A new water purification process that could eventually reduce the East San Gabriel Valley's dependence on imported water by 20% will be implemented next month, officials for the Three Valleys Municipal Water District in Pomona have announced.
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NATIONAL
March 25, 2013 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - On a warm Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Douglas Kanai wore a serene expression as Buddhist followers surrounded him outside his new storefront temple, sandwiched between a used-car dealer and a tax preparer's office. But his stories were far from peaceful, and the scene he described was not desert Nevada but faraway Tokyo in the dead of winter. The gambling mecca's roaring city traffic muffled his soft-spoken tales of physical endurance and a profound search for inner willpower that would eventually sustain him. To prove he possessed the fortitude to lead his own Nichiren temple, Kanai had to endure a test known in Japan as the "100 days.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2000
Eldon L. "Curley" Nobles, 74, who headed construction and water purification companies. A native of Hot Springs, Ark., Nobles grew up in Southern California and served in the Navy during World War II. He then became a tuna fisherman along the Central and South American coasts. Settling in Fullerton, he launched Fulton-Nobles Construction Co., which he headed for 27 years, specializing in grading land for Southland freeways. He later became board chairman of Unipure Corp.
WORLD
November 13, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
In the Haitian city of Gonaives, freshly dug pits at the back of the main cemetery are filling up with dozens of victims. In the capital, Port-au-Prince, hospitals are fast becoming emergency clinics. And in remote villages across much of the country, no one knows how many are dying. " Un pil moun " is all anyone can say. "A lot of people. " The official number of dead from Haiti's cholera epidemic was around 800 Saturday, but the real count is certainly higher as the water-borne disease stalks mountainous areas where people have to walk hours to the nearest hospital and deaths routinely go unrecorded.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As soon as he sees the sleek maroon Subaru with retractable headlights and quadraphonic sound system, Nils Niimann forgets all about the contract he's supposed to be negotiating. Jumping into the driver's seat of the showroom model, he spins the steering wheel under his beefy palms, whipping around an imaginary racetrack. He flicks on the headlights, fiddles with the radio, checks his spiky blond hair in the mirror.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1993
Most of us take water for granted. But the 250 or so California companies that manufacture and supply water purification systems hold H2O in such regard that they meet once a year to discuss its fine points. Their annual trade show took place last weekend at the Anaheim Hilton Hotel, where more than 1,000 people in the water business congregated. The event was sponsored by the Pacific Water Quality Assn., based in Huntington Beach, which represents the state's water purification companies.
NEWS
July 16, 1986
For $79.15, John Stalcup of Sausalito will sell you a duffel bag containing a flashlight and batteries, first-aid items, a radio, water bottle, water purification tablets, knife, blanket, compass, matches, stove, gloves, wire handsaw, tube tent, mess kit, cutlery, rope and food. Just in case the big one hits. Stalcup calls it an earthquake preparedness kit and claims that it will keep two people alive for at least three days.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1991
HOH Water Technology Corp. in Newbury Park said its securities were removed from NASDAQ because the company failed to meet the capital and surplus requirements set by the market's governing body, the National Assn. of Securities Dealers. NASDAQ, which stands for the association's automated quotation system, is the principal electronic network linking trades in the over-the-counter market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1992
Water can never be taken for granted in California, even though many of us live close to it. We import water; we recycle it; we devote no small amount of politicking to its allocation. Mostly, though, we hope water will always be there when we need it. Joan Irvine Smith, the visionary Irvine Co. heiress, has grasped the importance of progressive water management and does not take for granted the future availability of this valuable resource.
OPINION
September 2, 2007
Re "Making water," Opinion, Aug. 26 I commend Marc B. Haefele and Anna Sklar for bringing the issue of water conservation and reclamation back into the public debate. While it is regrettable that valiant efforts like the East Valley Water Reclamation Project continue to go unrealized, it is perhaps more regrettable that the even costlier desalination alternative lies in wait to appease the opponents of "toilet to tap."
OPINION
September 2, 2007
Re "Making water," Opinion, Aug. 26 I commend Marc B. Haefele and Anna Sklar for bringing the issue of water conservation and reclamation back into the public debate. While it is regrettable that valiant efforts like the East Valley Water Reclamation Project continue to go unrealized, it is perhaps more regrettable that the even costlier desalination alternative lies in wait to appease the opponents of "toilet to tap."
NEWS
July 26, 2005 | Linda Marsa
Bob DERLET drinks his water straight -- without fancy filters or chemical treatments. He leans face down into Delaney Creek, which flows directly down into Tuolumne Meadows from the Sierra Crest, taking healthy gulps from the rushing stream, and then fills his water bottle. It's nearly noon on an early summer day, and temperatures are hovering in the mid-80s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Saying that the amount of several trace elements found in Oxnard's water was too small to pose any real danger, the City Council has declined to take new purification measures that would have cost millions of dollars. Nineteen elements were detected in the water, according to a report to the California Department of Health Services. Of those, six had average concentrations at levels above federal and state minimum health standards, said Ken Ortega, Oxnard water superintendent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2000
Eldon L. "Curley" Nobles, 74, who headed construction and water purification companies. A native of Hot Springs, Ark., Nobles grew up in Southern California and served in the Navy during World War II. He then became a tuna fisherman along the Central and South American coasts. Settling in Fullerton, he launched Fulton-Nobles Construction Co., which he headed for 27 years, specializing in grading land for Southland freeways. He later became board chairman of Unipure Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994 | KURT PITZER
Goodby to those hallmarks of summers poolside: the stale, chlorine aftertaste from swimming; the chemical odor on your drying skin; the red eyes, the green hair. "Good, I hate chlorine," said Jennifer Hans, a West Hills mother of two boys who swim at the Pierce College pool. "So do my children." Her boys' favorite swimming hole this week became the first public pool in Los Angeles County to convert to a revolutionary sanitation system that leaves water relatively chemical-free.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1993
Most of us take water for granted. But the 250 or so California companies that manufacture and supply water purification systems hold H2O in such regard that they meet once a year to discuss its fine points. Their annual trade show took place last weekend at the Anaheim Hilton Hotel, where more than 1,000 people in the water business congregated. The event was sponsored by the Pacific Water Quality Assn., based in Huntington Beach, which represents the state's water purification companies.
WORLD
November 13, 2010 | By Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
In the Haitian city of Gonaives, freshly dug pits at the back of the main cemetery are filling up with dozens of victims. In the capital, Port-au-Prince, hospitals are fast becoming emergency clinics. And in remote villages across much of the country, no one knows how many are dying. " Un pil moun " is all anyone can say. "A lot of people. " The official number of dead from Haiti's cholera epidemic was around 800 Saturday, but the real count is certainly higher as the water-borne disease stalks mountainous areas where people have to walk hours to the nearest hospital and deaths routinely go unrecorded.
NEWS
July 26, 2005 | Linda Marsa
Bob DERLET drinks his water straight -- without fancy filters or chemical treatments. He leans face down into Delaney Creek, which flows directly down into Tuolumne Meadows from the Sierra Crest, taking healthy gulps from the rushing stream, and then fills his water bottle. It's nearly noon on an early summer day, and temperatures are hovering in the mid-80s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1993 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a deadline just a week away, Los Angeles water officials said Tuesday they will be a decade late in building a string of costly filtration plants the state has mandated to purify drinking water exposed to the elements in Encino, Hollywood and Stone Canyon reservoirs. And in their first estimate of the effect on rates, Department of Water and Power officials said the three filtration plants, costing roughly $150 million apiece, could raise the average customer's water bill by $3.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As soon as he sees the sleek maroon Subaru with retractable headlights and quadraphonic sound system, Nils Niimann forgets all about the contract he's supposed to be negotiating. Jumping into the driver's seat of the showroom model, he spins the steering wheel under his beefy palms, whipping around an imaginary racetrack. He flicks on the headlights, fiddles with the radio, checks his spiky blond hair in the mirror.
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