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NEWS
April 28, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a mirage lurking in a dip in the highway, Palm Springs shimmers enticingly atop the Sonoran Desert, an impossibly green splotch on a canvas of tawny brown. Outside the city, the flat, sandy landscape is broken only rarely by scraggly tamarisk trees, yucca plants and pathetic shrubs twisted by relentless desert winds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The governing board of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California gave tentative approval to a proposal to spend up to $337 million to buy water from farmers in the Palo Verde Valley in eastern Riverside County. Under the 35-year proposal, farmers would leave up to 29% of their land fallow so water that would otherwise be used to irrigate crops will be sent to the MWD. Only farmers who agree to sell water will be required to fallow.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1991
Orange County residents collectively use only about one-third as much water in their homes as people living in Los Angeles County-384,000 acre-feet versus 1.1 million. But the Orange County average use per residence is 21% higher than in Los Angeles. In 1990, Orange County households has an average consumption rate of 142,981 gallons per year according to Metropolitan Water District of Southern California projections; in Los Angeles County the comparable figure was 117,864.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a shortage of water flowing south from the Sierra snowpack, Southern California officials expect to tap into a mammoth new reservoir in Riverside County by summer, before it has even been filled for the first time. Though the reservoir may be pressed into service sooner than expected, the $2-billion project near Hemet, called Diamond Valley Lake, was planned as an insurance policy for just such a time as this, when water supplies run short, officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
The invitation was hard to resist--a helicopter flight to eastern Riverside County, where a huge, new reservoir will be built. The prospect of a helicopter ride prompted me to phone a quick RSVP. A close-to-the ground flight over the Eastside and the San Gabriel Valley into the farthest reaches of the Inland Empire would be a break from slogging around Southland freeways.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a shortage of water flowing south from the Sierra snowpack, Southern California officials expect to tap into a mammoth new reservoir in Riverside County by summer, before it has even been filled for the first time. Though the reservoir may be pressed into service sooner than expected, the $2-billion project near Hemet, called Diamond Valley Lake, was planned as an insurance policy for just such a time as this, when water supplies run short, officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The governing board of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California gave tentative approval to a proposal to spend up to $337 million to buy water from farmers in the Palo Verde Valley in eastern Riverside County. Under the 35-year proposal, farmers would leave up to 29% of their land fallow so water that would otherwise be used to irrigate crops will be sent to the MWD. Only farmers who agree to sell water will be required to fallow.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an emergency move to save billions of gallons of storm water that was flowing into the ocean, federal and local officials on Monday reached an agreement to store more water behind Prado Dam while at the same time protecting an endangered bird that nests there.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Water District, worried that an endangered rodent could block a bevy of vital water supply projects in Riverside County, has launched a study the district hopes will prove the Stephens kangaroo rat can be trapped and successfully relocated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1991
Orange County leads Southern California by a wide margin in the use of recycled water, defined as water that has been used, is treated and is reusable for irrigation. Of the total amount of recycled water used in 1990 by the six Southern California urbanized counties, about 60% is used by Orange County. And that percentage will hold by the year 2000 if current projections are correct. The Santa Ana River is the source for about 85% of all water recycled in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
The invitation was hard to resist--a helicopter flight to eastern Riverside County, where a huge, new reservoir will be built. The prospect of a helicopter ride prompted me to phone a quick RSVP. A close-to-the ground flight over the Eastside and the San Gabriel Valley into the farthest reaches of the Inland Empire would be a break from slogging around Southland freeways.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For almost 25 years, a little-known water district that covers much of the Temescal Valley in Riverside County sat idle with few assets, little overhead and no customers. The Lee Lake Water District, which spans 8,400 acres of rural land along Interstate 15 between Corona and Lake Elsinore, didn't even have rights to its namesake body of water. Now, with unprecedented residential growth projected for the next two decades in the valley, the water district has come to life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1991
Orange County leads Southern California by a wide margin in the use of recycled water, defined as water that has been used, is treated and is reusable for irrigation. Of the total amount of recycled water used in 1990 by the six Southern California urbanized counties, about 60% is used by Orange County. And that percentage will hold by the year 2000 if current projections are correct. The Santa Ana River is the source for about 85% of all water recycled in the county.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To Corona, Lake Elsinore's municipal water district is an "empire builder." In turn, Elsinore Valley Municipal Water District officials call Corona "a rattlesnake." Both agencies are fighting over the rights to the Temescal Valley Water Co., which primarily serves 6,500 acres of agricultural land in a region targeted for substantial residential, industrial and commercial growth in the next two decades. Each side claims it needs the Temescal Valley Water Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1991
County residents who have noticed a strange taste in their tap water can blame the drought. An increase in algae in Lake Mathews, a drinking water source for many county communities, has left a safe--albeit somewhat unpalatable--compound that the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California describes as tasting musty or earthy. The problem occurs in warm weather when algae multiply.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five years of debate and delays in resolving one of Southern California's most severe water pollution problems, state officials are completing a cleanup strategy for the Santa Ana River that affects three counties and could cost half a billion dollars. A recently released report that took three years and $1 million to compile outlines the solutions, all of which are controversial and expensive.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five years of debate and delays in resolving one of Southern California's most severe water pollution problems, state officials are completing a cleanup strategy for the Santa Ana River that affects three counties and could cost half a billion dollars. A recently released report that took three years and $1 million to compile outlines the solutions, all of which are controversial and expensive.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contaminants from sewage and cow manure are migrating rapidly through the ground water supply of western Riverside and San Bernardino counties, threatening to make water in nearly half of the region's subterranean basins undrinkable within 25 years, a new study shows. Preliminary results of the $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1991
Orange County residents collectively use only about one-third as much water in their homes as people living in Los Angeles County-384,000 acre-feet versus 1.1 million. But the Orange County average use per residence is 21% higher than in Los Angeles. In 1990, Orange County households has an average consumption rate of 142,981 gallons per year according to Metropolitan Water District of Southern California projections; in Los Angeles County the comparable figure was 117,864.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1991
Orange County will be expanding home water demands on a much smaller scale than four or five other urbanized counties in Southern California. Between 1990 and the year 2010, projected residential water needs will increase 28%. Only Los Angeles County, with a 13% projected jump, will require a smaller increase.
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