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Water Shortages California

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NEWS
January 9, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate Leader David A. Roberti plunged into the hazardous arena of California water politics Tuesday and proposed writing a new state plan to cope with the deepening drought and the demands of a rapidly expanding population. "I don't think there is anything more important facing the state of California," the Los Angeles Democrat said. "It is clear that California desperately needs a water plan."
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OPINION
June 20, 2002
Re "Farmers Oppose Call to Idle Land," June 17: When Imperial Irrigation District board member Bruce Kuhn described U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) as a "bureaucratic gasbag, pig-eyed sack of crap," I discounted his comments as an unnecessary and crude diatribe. Then I saw Kuhn's picture--standing in one of his alfalfa fields--on an inside page. Taking in his arms-folded-over-his-chest posture and his ample belly protruding over his belt, I concluded that his ill-advised comments about Feinstein might have more fittingly been directed at himself.
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BUSINESS
September 25, 1990 | HARRY ANDERSON
Just like many of us, a lot of the lush flowers and plants in California are immigrants too. And just like many of us, they often do better here than they did in their native lands. Which brings us to the drought and how it's affecting the multibillion-dollar California lawn and garden business. Californians spent $4.2 billion last year on gardening and landscaping, and that represents 26% of the national total, according to the California Assn. of Nurserymen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1997 | JOHN HOWARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
An expanding population could force significant water shortages in California during the next two decades--unless the state develops more storage or improves its delivery systems, experts warn. Moreover, some of the experts say that moving surplus water from rain-rich Northern California to Southern California is a top priority and believe that some form of the ill-fated Peripheral Canal--which state voters rejected in a 1982 referendum after an emotional debate--remains feasible.
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Despite last winter's punishing storms and raging floods in Northern California, a months-long stretch of dry weather has forced federal water authorities to announce a 10% cut in deliveries to Central Valley farmers. As a result, the growers and some Bay Area urban customers will get only 90% of the supplies they had anticipated.
OPINION
June 20, 2002
Re "Farmers Oppose Call to Idle Land," June 17: When Imperial Irrigation District board member Bruce Kuhn described U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) as a "bureaucratic gasbag, pig-eyed sack of crap," I discounted his comments as an unnecessary and crude diatribe. Then I saw Kuhn's picture--standing in one of his alfalfa fields--on an inside page. Taking in his arms-folded-over-his-chest posture and his ample belly protruding over his belt, I concluded that his ill-advised comments about Feinstein might have more fittingly been directed at himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1997 | JOHN HOWARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
An expanding population could force significant water shortages in California during the next two decades--unless the state develops more storage or improves its delivery systems, experts warn. Moreover, some of the experts say that moving surplus water from rain-rich Northern California to Southern California is a top priority and believe that some form of the ill-fated Peripheral Canal--which state voters rejected in a 1982 referendum after an emotional debate--remains feasible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
We are well on our way to a long-term solution to our chronic water shortages. Southern California, and indeed the West, does not really have a water shortage. Rather, we have a shortage of cheap water. A big difference! All of the easier to tap sources (i.e., rivers and streams) have already been tapped. What we are left with is more expensive sources, i.e., seawater desalination. However, now that water prices are rising, and approaching "real cost," alternative methods of providing water supplies are becoming feasible, and will see widespread use. The technology for providing, and guaranteeing, virtually unlimited supplies of water has been available for decades.
OPINION
January 7, 2001
Bertram Wolfe and Chauncy Starr ("State's Energy Problem Has Roots Nationwide," Commentary, Jan. 3) assume that demand for energy will continue to grow uncontrollably and that we should try to satisfy it at all costs, even if this means building more nuclear power plants. But the problem lies only partly with the limited supply of energy. As long as it was cheap, we were not careful with how we used it. Conservation should be our main focus in this energy crisis, for it is the only solution that is inexpensive, reduces our dependence on foreign governments and cartels and poses absolutely no environmental threats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991
The Times (April 21) carried two more depressing articles on the destruction of the environment and the erosion of our quality of life. Bill Stall's piece on long-term water shortages in California (Part A) and Cecilia Rodriguez's piece on mega-air pollution in Mexico City (Opinion) could be linked to show how resource depletion and pollution have become a global affliction on rich and poor alike in this last decade of the 20th Century. Although both journalists gave due credit to population growth and density as factors, neither used the term "overpopulation" or mentioned population planning as necessary or even desirable means for dealing with the catastrophes so alarmingly described.
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Despite last winter's punishing storms and raging floods in Northern California, a months-long stretch of dry weather has forced federal water authorities to announce a 10% cut in deliveries to Central Valley farmers. As a result, the growers and some Bay Area urban customers will get only 90% of the supplies they had anticipated.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate Leader David A. Roberti plunged into the hazardous arena of California water politics Tuesday and proposed writing a new state plan to cope with the deepening drought and the demands of a rapidly expanding population. "I don't think there is anything more important facing the state of California," the Los Angeles Democrat said. "It is clear that California desperately needs a water plan."
BUSINESS
September 25, 1990 | HARRY ANDERSON
Just like many of us, a lot of the lush flowers and plants in California are immigrants too. And just like many of us, they often do better here than they did in their native lands. Which brings us to the drought and how it's affecting the multibillion-dollar California lawn and garden business. Californians spent $4.2 billion last year on gardening and landscaping, and that represents 26% of the national total, according to the California Assn. of Nurserymen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1991 | RICHARD POLANCO, Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles) represents the 55th District in the California Assembly
Come rain or shine, we will have water shortages in Southern California. Meanwhile, water bureaucrats continue to meet and talk but accomplish little that will help us avert an economic disaster. Experts predict that if there is a 30% water shortage in the year 2000, 1 million Southern Californians will lose their jobs. We can't afford to gamble with 1 million jobs. The cost of desalination is insignificant compared with the economic impact of future water shortages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1988
The scare stories about future water shortages in California should be put to rest following the publication of the state Department of Water Resources' periodic assessment of water needs and supply. By and large, California will have enough water to support an expanding population, of up to 36 million by the year 2010, according to the report issued recently by Department Director David N. Kennedy. There are a number of conditions, of course.
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