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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1993 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uninvited visitors have wormed their way into Hawthorne's kitchens and bathrooms. A minor infestation of bloodworms--larvae of the gnat-like midge--is forcing the city to purge its municipal water system, which serves about half of Hawthorne's 12,000 households and businesses. The scarlet creatures, although unnerving to residents who have been finding them in their water glasses and bathtubs since last week, do not pose a health hazard, officials say.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Bob Pool
A 4-foot-diameter brick pipe discovered recently underneath a former restaurant by workers excavating a site was once part of the so-called Mother Ditch that carried water from the L.A. River to the city. The antiquity was uncovered April 10 as workers were beginning construction on the Blossom Plaza, a five-story mixed-use apartment and storefront project on North Broadway. About 73 feet of the Mother Ditch has been exposed at the project site. When first created in 1781, the Mother Ditch, or Zanja Madre, was an open ditch fed by a small dam built in the river, the city's main water source at the time.
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SCIENCE
July 16, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A new study of the landscape around the city of Tikal in the Peten rainforest of Guatemala shows that Maya of the Classic period -- from about AD 250 to 800 -- used Stone Age technology to build sophisticated water management systems that allowed the city's population to survive and even thrive during the droughts that frequently plagued the region's summers. The simple techniques that were used could provide lessons for modern-day farmers living in the region, the researchers reported.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
  Portland's now-infamous teenager who was caught on camera urinating into a reservoir there apparently told an online news site that he was relieving himself on a wall. Although tests on the open-air reservoir came back clean, the ick factor was enough for officials to go ahead with their plan to drain all 38 million gallons of drinking water and send it into the sea. Amid the controversy over that decision, the incident spotlights a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule that goes into effect next April, requiring that all reservoirs holding drinkable water are either covered or pass water to a retreatment plant before being sent to taps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Bob Pool
A 4-foot-diameter brick pipe discovered recently underneath a former restaurant by workers excavating a site was once part of the so-called Mother Ditch that carried water from the L.A. River to the city. The antiquity was uncovered April 10 as workers were beginning construction on the Blossom Plaza, a five-story mixed-use apartment and storefront project on North Broadway. About 73 feet of the Mother Ditch has been exposed at the project site. When first created in 1781, the Mother Ditch, or Zanja Madre, was an open ditch fed by a small dam built in the river, the city's main water source at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1996 | STEPHANIE BROMMER
Ventura's water system is being flushed nightly this month to clean the system and prevent the accumulation of mineral deposits and algae, and keep bacteria from forming in the water system conduits, city officials said. The city's water division is flushing the water system between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. until the project is completed. The flushing program is done at night--off-peak hours for water use--to reduce the impact on consumers, water division officials said.
NEWS
November 6, 1986
The city Water Department this week began its semiannual flushing of the water system to purge it of sediments and other impurities. City Water Supt. Al Rivier said the six-week process involves the opening of fire hydrants at intermittent points, which may cause a temporary loss of water pressure. Rivier said the flushing process will begin in the southwest quadrant of the city bordered by El Segundo and Hawthorne boulevards and then proceed to the southwest, northwest and the northeast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996 | JOHN POPE
After months of negotiating with private companies interested in operating the city's water system, officials have narrowed their choices to one: California-American Water Co. of Chula Vista. Tonight, at a special meeting, the City Council will decide whether to continue exclusive negotiations with the company or to abandon the controversial privatization plan altogether. California-American has offered the highest bid to lease and operate the water system, City Manager Bill Smith said.
OPINION
January 17, 2009
Re "Burn area's water plan stagnated," Jan. 12 The Times' story is highly misleading. In the face of the worst fire in the community's history, the water system operated by the Yorba Linda Water District functioned very well. The firestorm threatened about 9,500 homes; access to water may have affected five homes, according to the fire authority. The water system delivered tremendous volumes of water to the firefighters, far exceeding its design capacity. A report detailing the specifics is available on our website at ylwd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials Friday said that for the first time ever, the State Water Project that helps supply a majority of Californians may be unable to make any deliveries except to maintain public health and safety. The prospect of no deliveries from one of the state's key water systems underscores the depth of a drought that threatens to be the worst in California's modern history. But the practical effect is less stark because most water districts have other sources, such as local storage and groundwater, to turn to. Officials stressed that the cut did not mean faucets would run dry. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the state project's largest customer, has said it has enough supplies in reserve to get the Southland through this year without mandatory rationing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If "Watermark" does nothing else, it will make you question society's contradictory view of water use. The clear liquid is as essential to human life as it is threatened, yet we don't seem to be able to do what it takes to make sure it stays available enough to keep us alive. As co-directed by Jennifer Baichwal and Edward Burtynsky, "Watermark" is a kind of companion piece to the pair's earlier "Manufactured Landscapes," which looked at how new industrial structures are transforming the face of the planet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials Friday said that for the first time ever, the State Water Project that helps supply a majority of Californians may be unable to make any deliveries except to maintain public health and safety. The prospect of no deliveries from one of the state's key water systems underscores the depth of a drought that threatens to be the worst in California's modern history. But the practical effect is less stark because most water districts have other sources, such as local storage and groundwater, to turn to. Officials stressed that the cut did not mean faucets would run dry. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the state project's largest customer, has said it has enough supplies in reserve to get the Southland through this year without mandatory rationing.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2014 | By David Zucchino, This post has been updated and corrected, as indicated below.
First, federal regulators couldn't explain the possible health dangers posed by the mysterious coal-cleansing chemical that spilled into West Virginia's drinking water -- except that pregnant woman shouldn't drink it even after the water had been declared safe for everyone else. Then the chemical company responsible for the spill belatedly admitted a second, equally unpronounceable chemical containing ether also had been dumped into the water. Now comes this warning for hundreds of thousands of West Virginians: They may be inhaling formaldehyde while showering in the tainted water, which was declared safe for human consumption a week after the Jan. 9 spill into the Elk River just north of downtown Charleston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Bob Pool
Embarrassment is on tap when Maurene Nelson turns on a faucet at her Sierra Madre home. The water that flows out, she says, is often disturbingly yellow. "My bath was full of gold water last night," said Nelson, a speech communications instructor at Pasadena City College and Glendale Community College. Officials in the tiny city at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains say the temporary use of imported water provided by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is to blame for the off-putting color.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
Something bad has been in the water at Los Angeles International Airport for the last several weeks. With the city in the midst of a sweeping $2-billion transformation of the Tom Bradley International Terminal, airlines that use the facility's old and new gates have been unable to replenish their aircraft with drinking water because of contamination in the building's plumbing. According to airport emails obtained by The Times, the water is brown and contains high levels of bacteria and particles of copper, brass and rust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Tony Barboza and Jessica Garrison
The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday that she was disappointed by the slow progress state, federal and local governments have made in bringing potable drinking water to small towns in the San Joaquin Valley. "We've got rural communities that don't have clean water and there's no plan on how to get it to them," EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy said in a meeting with Los Angeles Times editors and reporters. McCarthy's comments follow the federal government's threat this spring to cut off clean drinking water funding because state officials have been sitting on more than $455 million in unspent federal money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
A major earthquake in the Bay Area could flood numerous islands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, cripple the state's water system and cost billions of dollars, according to a state report released Friday. The report, from the Department of Water Resources, found there is a 40% probability of an earthquake of magnitude 6.7 or higher causing 27 or more islands to flood at the same time in the next 25 years.
SCIENCE
August 26, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archeologists in Israel have unearthed an ancient water system that was modified by the conquering Persians to turn the desert into a paradise. The network of reservoirs, drainpipes and underground tunnels served one of the grandest palaces in the biblical kingdom of Judea. Archeologists first discovered the palace in 1954, a structure built on a 6-acre site where the communal Ramat Rachel farm now stands.
SCIENCE
October 25, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
When the Sacramento River runs high after a big storm, floodwaters rush into the Yolo Bypass, which carries them away from California's capital city to the river's downstream delta. In most years, the floodwaters quickly drain away. But what would happen if the bypass was full of water for longer periods when migrating salmon could use it? Would that provide salmon with the benefits of a natural floodplain and boost the struggling populations of Central Valley Chinook? A team of researchers conducting experiments in the bypass are coming up with some encouraging results.  In February, they released thousands of juvenile Chinook salmon from a hatchery in two areas of harvested rice fields that served as bypass research plots.
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