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NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Cities have wrestled with the notion of fluoridating water supplies to improve dental health for more than half a century. In the early days,  naysayers warned that fluoride was conceived as a secret Communist weapon to pacify unruly populations. Advocates have pleaded that parents are losing the war on cavities and need community backup. The latest battleground is Portland, Ore., the largest U.S. city that doesn't put fluoride in its municipal water supply. That appears about to change: A majority of the City Council has signaled a willingness to vote next week in favor of an ordinance to inject low levels of fluoride into drinking water, heading off a promised ballot initiative seeking to prevent it. The debate in free-thinking Portland has been a contest between the overwhelming weight of mainstream medical organizations -- which have weighed in on fluoridation as a safe and effective way of promoting dental health -- and concerns  of some critics about possible links to lower IQ and bone cancer at high doses, as well as  citizens' right to choose what is in their water.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Authorities Tuesday identified the woman whose remains were found last month at two water treatment plants 30 miles apart as Erin Lynn Cruz, 27, of East San Gabriel Valley. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department spokeswoman Nicole Nishida said a cause of death has not been determined. Cruz was last seen in the La Puente area late on the evening of Oct. 23, according to sheriff's homicide detectives. The body parts were discovered beginning Oct. 26, when a pelvis and legs were found at the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant in the 24500 block of South Figueroa Street in Carson.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Another set of human remains was found at a water-treatment facility in L.A. County on Monday, the second such discovery in less than a week. The latest remains were found Monday at a treatment facility in the 1900 block of Workman Mill Road near the 60 and 605 freeways, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Homicide detectives were en route to investigate the finding. KCBS-TV Channel 2 reported that the remains were found in one of the facility's water reclamation plant pools.  No information was immediately available on the nature of the discovery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Another set of human remains was found at a water-treatment facility in L.A. County on Monday, the second such discovery in less than a week. The latest remains were found Monday at a treatment facility in the 1900 block of Workman Mill Road near the 60 and 605 freeways, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Homicide detectives were en route to investigate the finding. KCBS-TV Channel 2 reported that the remains were found in one of the facility's water reclamation plant pools.  No information was immediately available on the nature of the discovery.
NEWS
October 21, 1990
Water from four contaminated city wells in the Arroyo Seco is now flowing free of polluting chemicals, thanks to a water treatment plant in operation for the last month. The $1.1-million Devil's Gate Water Treatment plant removes four volatile organic chemicals from the water by running it through two towers filled with plastic beads and equipped with air blowers. The process forces the chemicals to evaporate from the water into the air, where they are captured by granulated carbon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Days after the Metropolitan Water District asked residents and businesses to limit their water consumption while a key facility underwent a series of upgrades, consumers can now rest easy. The district's Robert B. Diemer Water Treatment Plant serving Orange County opened early Saturday, nearly a day ahead of schedule, after improvements were made to ensure the future availability of drinking water. The plant supplies 95% of the water used in south Orange County and half of the countywide total.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996 | MATEA GOLD
Malibu's Surfrider Beach is famous for its crashing waves--and notorious for its polluted waters. The popular spot has repeatedly rated an "F" in Heal the Bay's ocean safety report card. But surfers soon may have a chance to catch the waves without worrying about catching a virus. The city of Malibu is applying for a $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1990 | CAROLYN KUSKY
The Ventura County Regional Sanitation District decided Thursday to raise fees at the Montalvo waste water treatment plant but postponed until next month a plan to raise fees at two landfills that could increase residential garbage bills. The rate boost at the treatment plant, which takes effect July 1, will mean increased costs for businesses, such as builders who use portable toilets at construction sites, general manager Wayne Bruce said.
NEWS
November 12, 1995 | GAIL FISHER
When Russian scientists came to Orange County last month, they got their biggest kicks from tours most folks would steer clear of by miles: an inside peek at water treatment plants. "In Russia, we can only dream of this," Nadezhda Khodorovskaya, an associate professor at Chelyabinsk State Technical University, said after touring the Irvine Ranch Water District and other plants. The Russian delegation was one of several visiting UC Irvine at the behest of John Whiteley.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
In an accident at a Chivas Brothers bottling plant in Dumbarton, Scotland, workers flushed thousands of gallons of Scotch whiskey down the drain, the smell of it so strong that sewage workers reported the incident, the BBC reports . Workers who had intended to drain waste water unintentionally dumped the Scotch instead. The Epoch Times says it was 6,000 gallons of "high-quality, top-dollar Scotch. " The spirit was released to the local water treatment plant. In a statement Chivas Brothers said that the Tuesday accident at the plant, which employs 600 workers, is under investigation.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2012 | By Joe Tanfani
LONGPORT, N.J.--Many residents of the New Jersey coast woke up to a gray windy morning with no electricity, swamped homes, water surging in the streets -- and another high tide threatening additional flooding.  The Jersey Shore, including Atlantic City, remained under water, without power and was “completely unsafe,” said Gov. Chris Christie during a televised news conference. He recited a litany of destruction including homes knocked off their foundations, beach erosion and amusement park rides pushed into the sea. “The level of devastation on the Jersey Shore is unthinkable,” he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The high desert town of Hinkley is being torn apart, neighbor by neighbor, as homeowners grapple with a plume of carcinogenic pollution made famous by a Hollywood movie. Pacific Gas & Electric Co., which is responsible for the pollution, has given homeowners until Monday to decide whether to sell their homes. PG&E has offered to buy out 314 homeowners who live within a mile of the chromium-tainted plume of groundwater. Those accepting the offer are angering neighbors because the vacated homes are eroding an isolated ranching community of 800 people already edging toward ghost town.
NATIONAL
September 6, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Cities have wrestled with the notion of fluoridating water supplies to improve dental health for more than half a century. In the early days,  naysayers warned that fluoride was conceived as a secret Communist weapon to pacify unruly populations. Advocates have pleaded that parents are losing the war on cavities and need community backup. The latest battleground is Portland, Ore., the largest U.S. city that doesn't put fluoride in its municipal water supply. That appears about to change: A majority of the City Council has signaled a willingness to vote next week in favor of an ordinance to inject low levels of fluoride into drinking water, heading off a promised ballot initiative seeking to prevent it. The debate in free-thinking Portland has been a contest between the overwhelming weight of mainstream medical organizations -- which have weighed in on fluoridation as a safe and effective way of promoting dental health -- and concerns  of some critics about possible links to lower IQ and bone cancer at high doses, as well as  citizens' right to choose what is in their water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2012 | Bettina Boxall
The company that wants to pump large amounts of Mojave Desert groundwater and sell it for a profit to Southern California suburbs has run into opposition from an unexpected quarter: an international corporation that runs industrial salt operations next door to the proposed project. Texas-based Tetra Technologies Inc., an oil and gas services enterprise, has come out swinging at Cadiz Inc.'s pumping plans, filing two lawsuits, mounting a public relations campaign and dismissing the water project's environmental review as a sham designed to escape serious scrutiny.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
For most of us living in the developed world, diarrhea is an uncomfortable nuisance -- not a life-threatening event. But each year for more than a million children under the age of 5, it is a killer. It's known that a few simple precautions and treatments can make a difference and save a child. What's been unknown, say researchers led by Christa Fischer Walker of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, is whether providing those interventions makes a difference on a large scale, cutting disease and death rates around the globe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2009 | Martha Groves
If regional water quality officials approve a proposed ban on septic systems in central Malibu as expected, residential property owners in the affected area would be on the hook for $1,000 a month to pay for a centralized wastewater treatment system, city officials said Monday. Commercial property owners benefiting from the treatment system could be required to lay out significantly more, the city said. Malibu said in a statement that such a system would cost $52 million, more than three times the $16.7-million projection that the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board has suggested at recent community workshops.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2009 | Richard Fausset
With floodwaters finally receding, Georgians began the unglamorous task of cleaning up Wednesday, while taking stock of the destruction from an unprecedented autumn deluge that has claimed nine lives and caused an estimated $250 million in damage. Across the state, roads opened and residents returned to view the damage to their homes. In the early hours Wednesday, work crews managed to fix much of the damage to a city of Atlanta water-treatment plant that spilled millions of gallons of water into the Chattahoochee River.
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