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Watergate Affair

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NEWS
April 25, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
With his passion for history, Richard Nixon undoubtedly would have appreciated the irony. On the last day of the former President's life, Hillary Rodham Clinton sat in the State Dining Room at the White House, fielding the most intimate and pointed questions any First Lady had ever faced from reporters. Twenty years ago, she had come to Washington as a young law school graduate to work on the House Judiciary Committee's impeachment proceedings against Nixon.
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NATIONAL
April 23, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
W. Mark Felt, who for nearly 33 years denied that he was "Deep Throat," also held a tragic secret from his family: It was suicide, not a heart attack, that felled his wife after years of strain from Felt's FBI career and ensuing legal troubles. In his new book, "A G-Man's Life: The FBI, 'Deep Throat' and the Struggle for Honor in Washington," Felt reveals that Audrey Robinson Felt shot herself in 1984 with his .38 service revolver after a long emotional and physical decline.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1993
In response to your editorial ("Tape Job," May 19) on the subject of President Nixon's role in the Watergate affair: It avails a man nothing to be an astute politician if he is morally blind. JOAN W. HAYES Dana Point
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2005 | Mary McNamara
For those who have wondered why former deputy FBI director W. Mark Felt finally admitted he was "Deep Throat," the answer may be four words: movie and book deal. Felt's family recently joined Creative Artists Agency's client list, and now Variety reports that Universal Pictures and Playtone partners Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman have signed a deal with Felt.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | Reuters
CBS News, in a documentary Wednesday night on the Watergate affair, speculated that L. Patrick Gray, former acting director of the FBI, was "Deep Throat," the key source for the Washington Post in the affair. Deep Throat's identity has been a mystery since the character emerged in the book, "All the President's Men," written by Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein about the Watergate break-in. Gray, who declined to be interviewed for the documentary, has denied being Deep Throat.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | United Press International
Secretary of State George P. Shultz said today he told U.S. allies that the Iran- contra scandal is "an absolutely total contrast" to the Watergate affair that drove Richard M. Nixon from office. "In this case there is the desire on the President's part to see that everything comes out, is dealt with and we go about our business," Shultz told reporters.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It brought down a President, spawned an assertive mood in Congress, fostered a new generation of political leaders, brought about an array of reforms in government, altered American journalism and set a benchmark for subsequent political scandals. In short, the Watergate scandal radically transformed American politics. Yet many of the changes wrought by what began as "a third rate burglary" on June 17, 1972, appear to be evaporating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1987
The unraveling of the Iran- contra- White House tangle is a process that must be painful to all concerned Americans, no less than to the high officials who were involved. The inevitable comparisons to Watergate create a sense of deja vu , the quality of the instant replay, the feelings that we are retracing a familiar path. We see the investigators digging away and building their reputations, the journalists almost gleefully reporting the faintest scraps from an Administration that has evaded press confrontations with skill.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maja Tillman curled up in a chair at the Richard M. Nixon archives here, put on a set of bulky headphones and braced herself for the Smoking Gun. Suddenly, it was June 23, 1972, and the President of the United States was about to obstruct justice with his chief aide, H. R. Haldeman. With a puzzled look on her face, Tillman listened to a secret White House tape made six days after the Watergate break-in.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The daughter of the ex-FBI official who was revealed last week as "Deep Throat" has acknowledged that money played a role in the decision to go public. W. Mark Felt, 91, was the mysterious source used by Washington Post reporters in their investigation into the Watergate break-in, which led to the resignation of President Nixon.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The former FBI man unmasked as "Deep Throat" probably won't be prosecuted for sharing information with reporters during the Watergate scandal, Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales said. "It happened a long time ago," Gonzales said of W. Mark Felt's conduct more than 30 years ago, when he was the No. 2 man at the FBI. "The department has a lot of other priorities." Gonzales declined to characterize Felt as hero or villain. "I will leave it to history to make that determination," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Simon & Schuster in July will publish journalist Bob Woodward's book about his relationship with the Watergate source known as Deep Throat, who this week was revealed to be former FBI official W. Mark Felt. "The Secret Man: The Story of Watergate's Deep Throat" will tell how Felt guided Woodward's coverage of the political scandal, Simon & Schuster said Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2005 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
If W. Mark Felt, who outed himself this week as the almost mythic "Deep Throat" of Watergate, writes a book as has been speculated, few believe it would ultimately be of great historic value. Other than the mystery that has long surrounded the identity of the Washington Post's informant, there is little else that isn't already known about the scandal that toppled the Nixon presidency, some academics said.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Three decades after Watergate, a former top aide to President Nixon now contends that Nixon ordered the break-in that led to his resignation. Jeb Stuart Magruder previously had gone no further than saying that John N. Mitchell, the former attorney general who was running the Nixon reelection campaign in 1972, approved the plan to break into the Democratic Party headquarters at the Watergate office building.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
The 30th anniversary of Watergate today brings another round of theories and guesses about the identity of "Deep Throat," but the two journalists who dealt with the confidential source renewed their three-decade vow of silence. "You're going to get a kind of deep silence from us," said Washington Post writer Bob Woodward. Former White House Counsel John Dean has a new book, "Unmasking Deep Throat," in which he narrows the list to a "thimbleful."
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Liberal foes of Judge Robert H. Bork's nomination to the Supreme Court, knowing they will need more than a difference in philosophy to derail his appointment, are expected to look to Bork's role in the Watergate affair as a peg on which to hang their opposition. It was Bork, acting on the orders of President Richard M. Nixon, who fired Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox on Oct. 20, 1973--after then-Atty. Gen. Elliot L. Richardson and Deputy Atty. Gen. William D.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | From Associated Press
In their first face-to-face meeting, G. Gordon Liddy, mastermind of the bungled Watergate burglary, told columnist Jack Anderson that the President's men vetoed plans to silence the newsman. "The rationale was to come up with a method of silencing you through killing you," Liddy tells Anderson on "Real Story Update," a news show to be shown tonight on cable TV's CNBC.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and JACK NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than 20 years, Katharine Graham, head of the Washington Post and grande dame of American journalism, proudly displayed in her office the mechanical wringer from an old washing machine. It was a reminder that life entails risks--and that taking those risks can lead to greatness. During the early days of Watergate, when the Post labored almost alone to expose the improper and illegal actions that eventually forced President Richard M.
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the time came, G. Gordon Liddy approached the witness stand Monday with the confident posture of an actor and spoke with the controlled diction of a radio talk show host--the twin careers that have kept him in the public eye long since he first won infamy as a Watergate felon.
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