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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
Small tsunami waves and other unusual "water movements" arrived on the California coast Wednesday following an 8.2 earthquake that struck Chile's northern coast. Although officials stressed that no tsunami warning had been issued for California or the West Coast, the abnormal wave heights, tide fluctuations and current changes may have surprised boaters, they said. The first waves to strike California that were connected to Tuesday night's South American earthquake may have hit La Jolla about 4 a.m., said Bill Knight, an oceanographer with the National Tsunami Warning Center based in Alaska.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials announced Tuesday that they are temporarily waiving an endangered species protection to enable water managers to send more Northern California water south. The move comes as fishery agencies are under increasing political pressure to take advantage of late winter storms and ramp up pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the center of the state's water distribution system. Mark Cowin, director of the state Department of Water Resources, said the rule suspension would remain in effect for the next week or two and would increase delta exports by as much as 10,000 acre-feet a day. An acre-foot is equivalent to a year's water supply for two households.
OPINION
March 30, 2014
Re "The water revolution we need," Opinion, March 28 It's deceptive to say that agriculture uses 75% of "the water used in the state" without adding "for human use. " According to the California State Water Plan, urban use accounts for 11% and agriculture 41%; environmental use accounts for 48%. This is the developed water supply that can be managed and controlled. Agricultural water efficiency has never been greater. Farmers have invested billions of dollars in drip irrigation and other efficiency technologies and produce 85.4% more food and fiber per acre-foot of water than they did in 1967.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
The big guy in the water pitcher-filter market has practically become a common name, like Kleenex. But even Brita's most ardent fans might agree that those plastic containers aren't dinner party elegant. There's a new player hoping to fill that spot: Soma, a glass carafe with a plastic filter that sits inside it. The filter, which lasts two months, is biodegradable, made of coconut shell, silk and food-based plastic, the company says. It costs $49 with one filter; additional filters, automatically mailed to subscribers, cost $12.99.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
Officials are saying that a 19-year-old UC Santa Barbara water polo player who was found unresponsive at the bottom of a pool during practice died of an accidental drowning. Nick Johnson, a sophomore at UCSB, was swimming laps at the Santa Barbara High School pool Monday morning when he lost consciousness during the workout, multiple media outlets reported. The Santa Barbara County coroner's office told the Santa Barbara Independent the preliminary cause of death was accidental drowning.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy
If you're in the market for an alternative to plastic or metal water bottles, here are a few options: Lifefactory Flip Top Holds 22 ounces; weighs 19 ounces unfilled, $24.99 The cap at the mouthpiece is attached but flips back for sipping. The bottles are slightly curved, making them easy to hold. www.lifefactory.com/catalog/flip-cap CamelBak Eddy Holds 24 ounces; weighs 18.4 ounces unfilled, $24.95 Made with CamelBak's signature bite valve: Just bite and sip; no tipping required.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By Wade Graham
This year's drought has thrown California into a sudden tizzy, a crisis of snowpack measurements, fish-versus-people arguments and controversial cuts in water deliveries. But in reality, crisis is the permanent state of water affairs in the Golden State - by design, because our institutions keep it that way. California has 1,400 major dams, thousands of miles of aqueducts and pumps so powerful they lift water nearly 2,000 feet over the Tehachapis. The state uses enough water in an average year to support, in theory, 318 million Californians (and their lawns and dishwashers)
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
LOS ALGODONES, Mexico - Osvel Hinojosa knew that an infusion of water would bring the Colorado River delta back to life. But in just a few days, a U.S.-Mexican experiment to revive the delta environment has exceeded his expectations. The water is running deeper, faster and wider than anticipated in a channel that was once bone-dry. Hinojosa has spotted hawks, egrets and ospreys flying above the newly flowing water. He's even seen beavers. "It's just amazing to see that we can recover the river and see it alive again," said Hinojosa, water and wetlands program director at Pronatura Noroeste, a Mexican water conservation group.
OPINION
March 26, 2014
Re “ Drying up the delta ,” March 23 Bettina Boxall's front-page article - accompanied by striking photos of flooded fields being fed by scarce water from sources that also supply our vanishing Northern California delta - is all the testimony that we should need to impress upon us the grotesque priorities that we are still following in allocating our state's most critical natural resource. Those priorities mean that we are growing rice for shipment to Asia by flooding an expanding desert landscape in the heart of the Central Valley, while millions of Californians are experiencing a disastrous water shortage and we deprive our most productive growers of reasonable access to water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - A Senate panel Tuesday advanced one of the three competing proposals for water bond measures, but lawmakers acknowledged that more negotiations will be required to reach a consensus on what to put before voters. Lawmakers have two months to approve a bond measure that would replace an $11-billion water bond currently on the November ballot that is viewed by many as too large and too full of pork projects to win voter approval. “If we miss the June 26 deadline, then we are stuck with the current bond, which is destined for failure,” warned Assemblyman Anthony Rendon (D-Lakewood)
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