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Watts Summer Festival

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
The Watts Summer Festival — rising from the ashes of the riots that devastated the South Los Angeles neighborhood in 1965 — remains one of the longest-running African American cultural festivals in the country. Now in its 44th year, the annual celebration will include live music, theatrical and spoken-word performances, dance, art exhibitions, food booths and a community forum. Ted Watkins Memorial Park, 1335 E. 103rd St., L.A. noon-8 p.m. Fri.-Sun., Free. (323) 789-7304.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
The Watts Summer Festival — rising from the ashes of the riots that devastated the South Los Angeles neighborhood in 1965 — remains one of the longest-running African American cultural festivals in the country. Now in its 44th year, the annual celebration will include live music, theatrical and spoken-word performances, dance, art exhibitions, food booths and a community forum. Ted Watkins Memorial Park, 1335 E. 103rd St., L.A. noon-8 p.m. Fri.-Sun., Free. (323) 789-7304.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
Tommy Jacquette, who channeled a simmering rage to become one of South L.A.'s most important social activists, died this week of complications from cancer, his daughter said. He was 65. Jacquette died Monday at his home in Watts, not far from where the violence that shook his city began more than 40 years ago, an event that he said shaped his life of community organizing. He helped create programs for youth in Watts, worked tirelessly with neighborhood groups and helped found the annual Watts Summer Festival in 1966.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
Tommy Jacquette, who channeled a simmering rage to become one of South L.A.'s most important social activists, died this week of complications from cancer, his daughter said. He was 65. Jacquette died Monday at his home in Watts, not far from where the violence that shook his city began more than 40 years ago, an event that he said shaped his life of community organizing. He helped create programs for youth in Watts, worked tirelessly with neighborhood groups and helped found the annual Watts Summer Festival in 1966.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1993
The Watts Summer Festival, born in the ashes of the 1965 riots, comes home to Watts today for the first time in years. The festival runs through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at 111th Place and Wadsworth Avenue. The festival was begun to commemorate the 34 people killed in the 1965 Watts riots, but it had met with difficulties over the years because of waning corporate and county support. It was canceled in 1976, 1978 and 1987 because of financial difficulties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homer Ellis, Ronald Ludlow, George Adams Jr. and 31 others who died during the Watts riots of 1965 have not been forgotten. And a group of Watts residents gathered Wednesday near the flash point of that historic uprising to ensure that DeAndre Harrison, Vivian Austin and 49 other victims of the city's second round of rioting are remembered forever as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, the Watts Summer Festival had been all but pronounced dead. The once proud tradition, begun as a memorial to the 34 people killed in the 1965 Watts riot, had become another casualty of gang violence in South-Central Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 14, 1986
The Watts Summer Festival--originally scheduled to begin today and continue through the weekend--has been postponed, and a festival organizer blamed county officials. "Once again, the county of L.A. has thrown a monkey wrench into plans for the Watts Summer Festival," said a spokesman for festival organizer Truman Jacques. County supervisors requested a postponement until after Sept. 1.
NEWS
August 13, 1986
The Watts Summer Festival, which was scheduled to begin this weekend, was postponed today for at least a month so festival organizers could meet a county requirement of $1 million in liability insurance, officials said. "They had half of the insurance and they thought they had the other half and it turned out they didn't get it," said James Cleaver, an aide to County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn. County officials asked festival organizers to reschedule the event sometime after Sept. 1.
NEWS
August 12, 1987
For the third straight year, the organizers of the Watts Summer Festival have canceled the event, an outgrowth of the 1965 Watts riots, because of Los Angeles police fears that street-gang violence could mar the five-day festival. Tommy Jacquette, the festival's executive director, said that he and the festival's executive board could not persuade police officials to back the affair, which was to have begun today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2000 | JUDY RAPHAEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Charles Wright has glorious memories of playing the first Watts Summer Festival in 1966. "They had James Brown, Bill Cosby, Brenton Wood--everybody who was anybody was on that show. It was so packed, they had to lock the gates and people were jumping over the fence," said the veteran R&B musician, best known for his Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band and its 1970 classic, "Express Yourself."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1996
In celebration of the 30th anniversary of the upcoming Watts Summer Festival, the event's board of directors initiated the first "Founders Awards." Seven community leaders were honored Friday at a pre-festival luncheon at Phoenix Hall, a community center, for their contributions to the enrichment of education, art and history in Watts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1993
The Watts Summer Festival, born in the ashes of the 1965 riots, comes home to Watts today for the first time in years. The festival runs through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at 111th Place and Wadsworth Avenue. The festival was begun to commemorate the 34 people killed in the 1965 Watts riots, but it had met with difficulties over the years because of waning corporate and county support. It was canceled in 1976, 1978 and 1987 because of financial difficulties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Annette Mixon was not even born in 1966 when the first Watts Summer Festival attracted tens of thousands to celebrate African-American heritage and commemorate the deadly civil disturbances of one year earlier. But the 24-year-old USC graduate vividly recalls the carnage that rocked Los Angeles this year. That violence was the catalyst that brought Mixon to the African American Unity Center to help plan the 26th annual Watts Summer Festival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homer Ellis, Ronald Ludlow, George Adams Jr. and 31 others who died during the Watts riots of 1965 have not been forgotten. And a group of Watts residents gathered Wednesday near the flash point of that historic uprising to ensure that DeAndre Harrison, Vivian Austin and 49 other victims of the city's second round of rioting are remembered forever as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, the Watts Summer Festival had been all but pronounced dead. The once proud tradition, begun as a memorial to the 34 people killed in the 1965 Watts riot, had become another casualty of gang violence in South-Central Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Annette Mixon was not even born in 1966 when the first Watts Summer Festival attracted tens of thousands to celebrate African-American heritage and commemorate the deadly civil disturbances of one year earlier. But the 24-year-old USC graduate vividly recalls the carnage that rocked Los Angeles this year. That violence was the catalyst that brought Mixon to the African American Unity Center to help plan the 26th annual Watts Summer Festival.
NEWS
August 12, 1987
For the third straight year, the organizers of the Watts Summer Festival have canceled the event, an outgrowth of the 1965 Watts riots, because of Los Angeles police fears that street-gang violence could mar the five-day festival. Tommy Jacquette, the festival's executive director, said that he and the festival's executive board could not persuade police officials to back the affair, which was to have begun today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1986 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
One began as a celebration of L.A.'s cultural diversity, the other as a commemoration of lives lost in a bloody chapter of the city's history. But both the Street Scene and the Watts Festival shared a vision: a peaceful gathering of humanity. Now, clouds hang over both events. The mayor, citing incidents of violence, wants to abolish the Street Scene--but the City Council isn't so sure.
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