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NEWS
September 23, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Less than half a mile of Intracoastal Waterway lies between the South Carolina mainland and its beachfront neighbors here, Sullivans Island and the Isle of Palms. But, in the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo on Friday, that gulf had come to seem enormous. Across the water lay the hint of disaster: Nowhere had the mighty storm struck with such devastating force. Up to 20 citizens who had defied orders and waited out the storm on the oceanfront could be in grave peril. No one knew their fate.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
Small tsunami waves and other unusual "water movements" arrived on the California coast Wednesday following an 8.2 earthquake that struck Chile's northern coast. Although officials stressed that no tsunami warning had been issued for California or the West Coast, the abnormal wave heights, tide fluctuations and current changes may have surprised boaters, they said. The first waves to strike California that were connected to Tuesday night's South American earthquake may have hit La Jolla about 4 a.m., said Bill Knight, an oceanographer with the National Tsunami Warning Center based in Alaska.
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HEALTH
April 27, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
Warning: Necomimi cat ears may not be your thing if (1) you like to blend in with the crowd (they're fuzzy and larger than life-size, and you wear them on your head), (2) you like to be mysterious and inscrutable (they enable people to read your mind) or (3) you don't like to have a good time ("They're a lot of fun," says Stanley Yang, chief executive of NeuroSky, the San Jose company that makes the ears). The ears come on a headband that contains the microchip that basically runs the show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - When the state Senate took up the issue of affirmative action in late January, it was a relatively tepid affair. After 20 minutes of polite debate, senators passed a measure that, if approved by voters, would overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public higher education. But within weeks, the debate turned fractious. Backlash arose among some Asian Americans who feared their children could lose access to the state's universities if more places were granted to students from other minority groups.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
What's it like to stare down a 78-foot wave? It's really no big deal. Or so big-wave legend Garrett McNamara claims. “I got desensitized by riding so many big waves that I don't really get a rush anymore,” McNamara said with a laugh, adding, “I'm hoping I get the rush someday when I find a big enough wave.” It's hard to tell if he's kidding because McNamara has ridden many of the world's largest waves. So many that it's hard to keep track of all his record-setting rides.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Some of the biggest waves to hit Hawaii in years began slamming onto shore Wednesday, turning beachgoers into spectators as waves up to 40 feet tall crashed into idyllic getaways. Waves up to 50 feet high were feared on the famous North Shore of Oahu and at other islands. Beaches were closed across the island chain as the surge was expected to peak Wednesday night and remain potentially dangerous through Thursday.  Coastal roads and parking lots reportedly flooded as wind gusts up to 40 mph whipped onlookers and tore fronds from palm trees.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Several stars and E! Network red carpet hosts have mentioned that the Screen Actors Guild Awards has the “most fun and easy-going red carpet” of the season. The tousled, wavy tresses sported by some actresses is proof. Anna Gunn's textured waves were refreshingly easy to achieve and a deliberate choice to differentiate from the actress' recent string of up-dos on red carpets. Hair stylist Aviva Perea started by prepping Gunn's hair with Phytovolume Volumizing Spray from roots to ends and blew out her hair with a large Spornette Mixed Bristle Brush.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
When we asked writer Debra Prinzing to profile rising Los Angeles designer Kyle Schuneman , we also asked Schuneman to share three projects from his DIY decorating book due out next week. He kindly agreed, walking readers through yarn-wrapped picture frames, striped dining chains and, now, dip-dye curtains. Schuneman said he has done the project twice: once in a bathroom, where he dried the curtain over the tub, and once outside, where he hung the curtain from a tree. In his new book, the curtains make waves in a Seattle apartment with a little bit of urban grit.
BOOKS
March 8, 1992
For a book I am writing on the WAVES (Women Appointed for Volunteer Emergency Service) from 1942 until the end of the war, I would appreciate hearing from any former WAVE who might have saved copies of the Conning Tower, a bimonthly publication of the Women's Naval Reserve at Hunter College, the Bronx. LAURA G. RAPAPORT (Former Lt. Comdr.), 10736 Wrightwood Lane, Studio City, CA 91604
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Robert "Roberto" Rotherham stepped onto the black-sand beach before 6 a.m., cradling his well-worn surfboard. Gone are the times when he would tackle El Salvador's majestic waves alone. There were at least 30 other people out before dawn on this warm weekday morning. It was late March and the swells were the season's biggest yet. "Blessed by the good Lord," Rotherham said. El Salvador's surf has long been an open secret among the wave-wise aficionados who journey here from California, Europe and the rest of Latin America.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Now that spring is here, maybe it's time to grab your surfboard and head to some far-off coastline -- perhaps as far as the outer solar system. Scientists using NASA's Cassini spacecraft have found hints of waves sloshing on Titan, Saturn's largest moon - the first time waves like those in Earth's oceans have ever been found on another world. Titan is the second largest moon in the solar system, after Jupiter's moon Ganymede, and it's sometimes called a planet-like moon: It's the only other world in our neighborhood to feature stable bodies of liquid on its surface, and it has a thick atmosphere made mostly of nitrogen.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
What's it like to stare down a 78-foot wave? It's really no big deal. Or so big-wave legend Garrett McNamara claims. “I got desensitized by riding so many big waves that I don't really get a rush anymore,” McNamara said with a laugh, adding, “I'm hoping I get the rush someday when I find a big enough wave.” It's hard to tell if he's kidding because McNamara has ridden many of the world's largest waves. So many that it's hard to keep track of all his record-setting rides.
SCIENCE
March 17, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Nearly 14 billion years ago, in a tiny fraction of a second after the Big Bang, the universe suddenly expanded from smaller than an atom to 100 trillion trillion times its original size, faster than the speed of light. This mysterious period, known as cosmic inflation, had been theorized but never confirmed. But now, scientists using telescopes at the South Pole say they have discovered the first direct evidence for this incredible growth, in the signature of gravitational waves.
SPORTS
March 15, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
There were distinct flickers of playoff-like hate, here and there Saturday night at Staples Center. You had Kings forward Jeff Carter and Ducks defenseman Francois Beauchemin snapping and taking jabs at each other behind the play in the first period with Carter later clearing out the defenseman along the boards. Then there was the game-within-a-game battle between Ducks star forward Corey Perry and Kings defenseman Robyn Regehr, flaring again at the end of the second period. BOX SCORE: Ducks 2, Kings 1 This may have been short of a true preview of what could possibly be a first-ever playoff matchup between the Ducks and the Kings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Temperatures in some parts of Los Angeles County will still likely exceed 90 degrees this weekend, but it may not be quite as hot as meteorologists initially predicted. As David Sweet of the National Weather Service in Oxnard put: "Not quite as hot. Still pretty warm. " The coasts are forecast to have temperatures Saturday in the mid-70s, and from the low to mid-80s farther inland. In the valleys, temperatures in the low to mid-80s are expected. Photos: California's drought Sunday remains the hottest day in the forecast, with temperatures in the 70s at the beaches and in the 80s inland, Sweet said.
WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Henry Chu
BERLIN - The last time she checked, Katya Tasheva had the normal number of limbs and eyes. So she feels a nasty shock of non-recognition, she says, when German news reports warn of a coming invasion of people like her - Bulgarians - as if they were aliens from space. "It's all of a sudden like we're these three-eyed, five-legged people who are all going to steal stuff," said Tasheva, 27, a singer who has lived in Berlin for nine years. "Normally when I listen to these comments, I just laugh and switch the channel or turn the page….
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Spring does not technically begin for at least another week, but summer-like weather is already headed to Los Angeles, with temperatures this weekend possibly beating 90 degrees in some areas. The weekend heat wave prompted forecasters to issue a heat advisory, warning the public to take precautions. After a relatively cool Thursday, with temperatures in the mid-60s to lower-70s, conditions are expected to start heating up, with highs on Saturday in the mid-80s in the valleys and from 75 to 80 degrees along the coasts.
OPINION
March 13, 2014 | By Jack Shakely
You've probably never heard of donor-advised funds, but they are taking over the philanthropic world. It all started as a matter of economics. A million dollars to most of us is a lot of money. But as start-up cash for a philanthropic foundation it's chump change. A million-dollar foundation can easily cost more to run than it gives away. So an alternative was created by the IRS to give modest philanthropic efforts a cheaper, easier path to existence, bundling them together under an umbrella nonprofit for investment and management.
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