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BUSINESS
July 22, 2009 | Hugo Martin
A wax war is heating up on Hollywood Boulevard. For 44 years, the Hollywood Wax Museum has been Tinseltown's only wax attraction featuring celebrities, a monopoly that has kept it open through wars, recessions and riots. But that all is changing with the opening of Madame Tussauds, Hollywood Boulevard's newest multimillion-dollar attraction, next to the historic Grauman's Chinese Theatre. The 40,000-square-foot building officially opens to the public Aug.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
San Francisco's wax museum, whose Chamber of Horrors, King Tut and Last Supper exhibits attracted millions of visitors to Fisherman's Wharf, is closing its doors Thursday after more than 50 years. The family-run museum was opened in a converted grain warehouse in 1963 by Thomas Fong, who had been inspired by the wax figures he saw while visiting the Seattle World's Fair, according to the museum. It started out with 75 life-sized wax figures and eventually grew to four floors, with more than 200 iconic figures including Abraham Lincoln, Princess Diana and Oprah Winfrey.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 1990 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Down the long and twisting hallway, Yul Brynner glowers defiantly as the King of Siam, a pistol-waving Roger Moore lunges as Agent 007, and the cast of "Star Trek" goes where no man has gone before. A trickle of visitors pause at the displays for a few seconds at a time, usually just long enough to admire the gleam in Ed Asner's glass eyes or the cut of Marilyn Monroe's gown. Then they move on.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Britney Spears' head sits on a pedestal on a dressing table in front of a mirror. Her blond hair is mussed, her brown eyes glassy. Betty White stands 10 feet away, wearing a blue dress and looking a bit lost. Her back is turned on Angelina Jolie's bare torso, as if trying to ignore it. "Betty and Britney are off the floor today, but they'll be back tomorrow," says Colin Thomas, the manager of Madame Tussauds Wax Museum in Hollywood, pointing in Britney's direction. "She needs her hair done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1988
Lia Di Leo figures that over the last 20 years she has sculpted more than 600 figures for wax museums from Hollywood to Nashville to Singapore. Some 500 to 600 people a day pay $5 each to view her poetry frozen in the shape of 180 wax figures at the Hollywood Wax Museum at 6767 Hollywood Blvd., a tourists' favorite. Behind the scenes, off-limits to visitors, is the sawdust-strewn and wax-covered workshop where the minor sets are built and costuming and animation is done.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Britney Spears' head sits on a pedestal on a dressing table in front of a mirror. Her blond hair is mussed, her brown eyes glassy. Betty White stands 10 feet away, wearing a blue dress and looking a bit lost. Her back is turned on Angelina Jolie's bare torso, as if trying to ignore it. "Betty and Britney are off the floor today, but they'll be back tomorrow," says Colin Thomas, the manager of Madame Tussauds Wax Museum in Hollywood, pointing in Britney's direction. "She needs her hair done.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1986 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
As a youngster, David Robert Cellitti would stay up until 3 or 4 a.m. to catch showings of horror movie classics like "Frankenstein" and "Dracula." One particularly inspiring movie for Cellitti was "House of Wax," the 1953 chiller that launched Vincent Price's horror career and also planted the seeds of Cellitti's future vocation.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It makes for a tricky turn through customs, Judy Craig admits, as she unzips her nylon carry-on. One can't help but call up a perp walk of creepy creatures plucked from murky "Outer Limits" episodes as Craig pulls out what at first glance is a head--a real head. But not just any head--the head of the Italian Stallion himself, Sylvester Stallone. She sits it upright on the hotel bed. It stares quizzically into space from its quilty peach perch.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1988
I teach seventh and eighth grades at Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach. In sharing Allan Jalon's article (The Times, Jan. 1) about Allen Parkinson's proposed museum in Santa Ana (a wax museum, it would include a miniature Naxi concentration camp), I found my students to be appalled (by) the entire article. They asked if they could write letters to the paper. I encouraged them to do so. I am enclosing some of their responses to Parkinson's proposal. I, too, am offended (by) his ideas.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | Associated Press
A fire early Wednesday destroyed the Mexico City Wax Museum.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2011
A star such as Jim Carrey doesn't come around every day, but wax sculptors say they can reproduce him in about six months, down to his brown eyes and signature toothy grin. The celebrity replicas featured at the Hollywood Wax Museum and at Madame Tussauds are crafted using some similar techniques. Research. Both wax museums collect photos, death masks or other renditions of the celebrity. Whenever possible, Madame Tussauds invites the celebrities for a sitting to have more than 250 measurements taken.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2011 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Dissing Angelina Jolie normally isn't the best way to get ahead in this town. But tough times call for tough tactics in the war of the Hollywood wax museums. Madame Tussauds, which considers itself the ne plus ultra of wax artistry — with the $25 ticket price to match — is trying to best its cheaper competitor, the Hollywood Wax Museum, with a new marketing blitz stressing the defects in its rival's paraffin starlets, singers and comics. In a wax version of a cola taste test, Madame Tussauds plans to let visitors decide whose figures most closely resemble their glamorous living counterparts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
In a way, it all comes down to the ass' jawbone. Students of musical Americana will hear plenty of rustic sounds when David Wax Museum plays Wednesday night at the Wiltern, including shades of folk, blues, rock and bluegrass, along with the Mexican regional varietals of son jarocho , son huasteco and son calentano . Guitars, fiddles, accordions and the Mexican jarana , a baroque eight-string cousin of the guitar, all are part...
BUSINESS
July 22, 2009 | Hugo Martin
A wax war is heating up on Hollywood Boulevard. For 44 years, the Hollywood Wax Museum has been Tinseltown's only wax attraction featuring celebrities, a monopoly that has kept it open through wars, recessions and riots. But that all is changing with the opening of Madame Tussauds, Hollywood Boulevard's newest multimillion-dollar attraction, next to the historic Grauman's Chinese Theatre. The 40,000-square-foot building officially opens to the public Aug.
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
TIM BURTON knows the dark side. He's not evil, exactly, but his films often take grotesque elements and twist them into something more endearing than repulsive. Take the Pumpkin King in "The Nightmare Before Christmas" who scares good boys and girls with well-meaning presents that explode or chase them around the house. Or the tender young man in "Edward Scissorhands" who can't fit in because of those enormous shears at the end of his arms.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2006 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
Can Hollywood be too ... Hollywood? Madame Tussauds, the legendary London wax museum, proposes to build a flashy $55-million branch in Hollywood -- its first on the West Coast -- on a parking lot next to historic Grauman's Chinese Theatre. However, the two-century-old entertainment company that invented the "Chamber of Horrors" may not be the most welcome addition to the neighborhood.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2011
A star such as Jim Carrey doesn't come around every day, but wax sculptors say they can reproduce him in about six months, down to his brown eyes and signature toothy grin. The celebrity replicas featured at the Hollywood Wax Museum and at Madame Tussauds are crafted using some similar techniques. Research. Both wax museums collect photos, death masks or other renditions of the celebrity. Whenever possible, Madame Tussauds invites the celebrities for a sitting to have more than 250 measurements taken.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
In a way, it all comes down to the ass' jawbone. Students of musical Americana will hear plenty of rustic sounds when David Wax Museum plays Wednesday night at the Wiltern, including shades of folk, blues, rock and bluegrass, along with the Mexican regional varietals of son jarocho , son huasteco and son calentano . Guitars, fiddles, accordions and the Mexican jarana , a baroque eight-string cousin of the guitar, all are part...
NEWS
October 26, 2006 | By Scott Timberg, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
TIM BURTON knows the dark side. He's not evil, exactly, but his films often take grotesque elements and twist them into something more endearing than repulsive. Take the Pumpkin King in "The Nightmare Before Christmas" who scares good boys and girls with well-meaning presents that explode or chase them around the house. Or the tender young man in "Edward Scissorhands" who can't fit in because of those enormous shears at the end of his arms. Or "The Corpse Bride," a brokenhearted beauty whose eye pops out at inopportune times and whose body is infested by a maggot who won't shut up. So it's only natural that, with Halloween fast sneaking up on us and a new 3-D version of "The Nightmare Before Christmas" just out, we turned to Burton to take us on a tour of frightening spots in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
The group of men whom Spoony Singh raised a glass with in 1964 included the owner of a traveling circus with a collection of wax figures, which may explain why somebody suggested Hollywood as the perfect setting for a wax museum. The next day, Singh flew from Victoria, Canada, to stroll the streets of Hollywood. Popping into the hot spots, he failed to see a single celebrity but noticed that plenty of the non-famous made do with the footprints of the stars at Grauman's Chinese Theatre.
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