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Waylon Jennings

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2002 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Waylon Jennings, the black-clad singer who personified country music's 1970s "outlaw" movement, died Wednesday from complications of diabetes. He was 64. Jennings, who had struggled with diabetes-related health problems in recent years--he had a foot amputated last year--died peacefully at his Arizona home, according to his spokeswoman, Schatzi Hageman. Jennings' chief legacy rests with his role in liberating country music from Nashville's conventions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Country singer and songwriter Tompall Glaser, a member of country's “outlaw” movement of the 1970s, has died after a long illness, his nephew Louis Glaser has told the Associated Press. He was 79. An associate of Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson, Glaser never achieved the stardom accorded his fellow outlaws, but was a part of country music history for his role on the 1976 album “Wanted! The Outlaws,” which featured tracks by Glaser, Nelson, Jennings and Jessi Colter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2002
I read many articles about Waylon Jennings last week, but Robert Hilburn's was the most nuanced and insightful ("Tenderness in a Country Tough Guy," Feb. 15). I have listened to his music for most of my life and always believed that while it was the macho-posturing songs that drew the most reaction from the crowds, it was the sensitive, slower songs that people really listened to. ALONSO JASSO Las Vegas I was very touched by Robert Hilburn's article. I'm 55 years old and grew up listening to Waylon, Willie Nelson, Buck Owens and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
J.J. Cale, the songwriter behind Eric Clapton classics such as “Cocaine” and “After Midnight,” died Friday at the age of 74. The singer-songwriter's official website confirmed Cale passed away at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla after suffering a heart attack Friday night. Born John Weldon Cale in Oklahoma City, he's revered for pioneering the “Tulsa Sound,” a blend of rockabilly, country, jazz and blues. PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2013 Cale, who scored minor solo hits like "Crazy Mama" and "Lies," is better known for tunes like “After Midnight” and “Cocaine” which Clapton covered and turned into smashes.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Country music star Waylon Jennings is singing a different tune since gaining a high school eqivalency diploma: "Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be dropouts." Jennings was scheduled to accept his General Educational Development certificate from Kentucky First Lady Martha Wilkinson at the Capitol in Frankfort today. He enrolled in Kentucky Educational Television's "GED on TV" program last fall after talking about it with Mrs. Wilkinson, the wife of Gov. Wallace Wilkinson.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN
Waylon Jennings is thankful for a second chance. After establishing himself in the '70s as one of the most dynamic figures ever in country music, Jennings all but destroyed his singing voice because of prolonged cocaine use, he acknowledges. His voice was in such bad shape a couple of years ago that a friend, who once worked with Jennings and remains a big fan, was moved to tears when she heard him in concert here. And Jennings wasn't just having problems on stage and in the recording studio.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
Isn't it great how Clint Black, Garth Brooks, George Strait and most of the rest of country music's new breed of stars are all such good, solid, straightforward, upstanding guys, the sort you'd want as your next-door neighbor? Nahh. While the best of the newcomers certainly have their merits, old-line country stars tend to be a lot more colorful--none of them more so than Waylon Jennings. Jennings, now 53, is one of the ultimate pop music reprobates.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
Let's face it: With the presidential campaign on permanent spin cycle, with candidates who persist in dirtying each other while refusing to come clean on crucial economic issues, this election season has been a real washout for American democracy. Fortunately, there are still some reliable sources of straight talk left in this land. Waylon Jennings is one of them. On his new album, "Full Circle," the veteran country singer offers a homespun little waltz called "Yoyos, Bozos, Bimbos and Heroes."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
It usually seems that country singers start singing about how rough and rowdy they are at just about the point in their careers when they stop being rough and rowdy. But Waylon Jennings has been singing about his wild ways for years now, and even triple-bypass heart surgery and its concomitant changes in lifestyle haven't taken the edge off his music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Waylon Jennings may no longer be "Lonesome, On'ry and Mean," as one of his old album titles had it, but age hasn't completely mellowed the grizzled country music legend. He doesn't suffer music biz Philistinism gladly, and he doesn't mind telling you all about it--although his tone is more exasperated and bemused than bitter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
J.J. Cale, a laconic, Oklahoma-born musician who shunned the spotlight but gained fame by penning such hits as "After Midnight" and "Cocaine," has died. He was 74. His death from a heart attack Friday at a La Jolla hospital was disclosed on his website and by Mike Kappus, the head of his management agency. In 1970, Cale, a self-taught guitarist, was just scraping by in Tulsa when he heard Eric Clapton on the radio singing "After Midnight. " Four years earlier, Cale had written the song and released it to deafening silence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011
MUSIC With five studio albums under his belt, including last year's "Up on the Ridge," Phoenix-born country music star Dierks Bentley has made his mark on the Nashville scene as a singer-songwriter with feet in both traditional and contemporary camps. Bentley, whose style harkens back to the Outlaw country stylings of Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings — with touches of bluegrass, rock and western swing thrown in — racked up hits such as "What Was I Thinkin'?" "Come a Little Closer" and "Settle for a Slowdown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Ralph Mooney, the influential steel guitarist whose crisp, melodically rich and rhythmically buoyant sound bolstered dozens of country music hits by artists including Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, Wynn Stewart and Wanda Jackson before he joined Waylon Jennings' band for a 20-year stint, has died. He was 82. Mooney died Sunday at his home in Kennedale, Texas, of complications from cancer, said his wife, Wanda. Although he had slowed down in recent years, he still played and recorded periodically until near the end of his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Hank Cochran, the esteemed country music songwriter revered for the poetic economy and power of such enduring hits as Patsy Cline's "I Fall to Pieces" and Eddy Arnold's "Make the World Go Away," died Thursday at his home in Hendersonville, Tenn., after a battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 74. Cochran was joined Wednesday night by musicians Jamey Johnson and Billy Ray Cyrus and fellow songwriter Buddy Cannon, who sang songs with him at his bedside. In a career spanning more than half a century, Cochran wrote or co-wrote hundreds of songs recorded by Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings, George Jones, Loretta Lynn, Willie Nelson, Elvis Presley, Ray Price, George Strait and numerous others.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2010 | By Randy Lewis >>>
The world that Shooter Jennings has created in his ambitious new album, "Black Ribbons," is more ominous than brave and more nerve-rackingly familiar than new in presenting a scenario of the dark days ahead for humankind in the tradition of Aldous Huxley's classic 1932 novel. Yet the singer and songwriter, the maverick offspring of country music outlaws Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter, is putting his message across in myriad ways that Huxley wouldn't even have imagined in his treatise about a technological society in which there's little room for human connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2006 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
Waylon Jennings was a protege of Buddy Holly, a roommate of Johnny Cash, a musical partner of Willie Nelson and a favorite of Bob Dylan -- and a new, four-disc retrospective from RCA/Legacy Records shows why all those talents were drawn to him. I'll even throw in another famous name for good measure: Elvis Presley. He's who Jennings reminded me of the first time I saw him in the '60s in concert in Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's obvious that we're never going to see George Foreman knock Mike Tyson's block off or Nolan Ryan make Albert Belle leave the ballpark in tears, so the no-longer-young among us need a new champion who can take up the banner of gumption and experience and wave it defiantly on turf where youth normally rules. Waylon, hoss, it looks like you're the man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
J.J. Cale, a laconic, Oklahoma-born musician who shunned the spotlight but gained fame by penning such hits as "After Midnight" and "Cocaine," has died. He was 74. His death from a heart attack Friday at a La Jolla hospital was disclosed on his website and by Mike Kappus, the head of his management agency. In 1970, Cale, a self-taught guitarist, was just scraping by in Tulsa when he heard Eric Clapton on the radio singing "After Midnight. " Four years earlier, Cale had written the song and released it to deafening silence.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2003 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
Rosanne CASH tells a sweet, revealing story about her stepmother, June Carter Cash, in the liner notes of the latter's warm, posthumous "Wildwood Flower" album, which will be released Tuesday. It seems the pair was at home a few years ago when the living room phone rang. June answered it and became so engrossed in conversation that Rosanne finally went into the kitchen. "I just had the nicest conversation," June said after rejoining Rosanne half an hour later.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2002
I read many articles about Waylon Jennings last week, but Robert Hilburn's was the most nuanced and insightful ("Tenderness in a Country Tough Guy," Feb. 15). I have listened to his music for most of my life and always believed that while it was the macho-posturing songs that drew the most reaction from the crowds, it was the sensitive, slower songs that people really listened to. ALONSO JASSO Las Vegas I was very touched by Robert Hilburn's article. I'm 55 years old and grew up listening to Waylon, Willie Nelson, Buck Owens and others.
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