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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2002 | KEVIN McKEOUGH, SPECIAL TO THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Touring is a burden for many musicians, but for Wayne Hancock, it's cause for celebration. "It's the life that I like best ... so give me my guitar and I'll roam," the hillbilly-swing songwriter sings on "Man of the Road," one of many songs about highways, driving and trains that make up most of his most recent CD, "A-Town Blues" (on Bloodshot Records). "You can live like a king, man, and stay out here, stay in nice hotels every night," Hancock says in a phone call from, naturally, a hotel room.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2002 | KEVIN McKEOUGH, SPECIAL TO THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Touring is a burden for many musicians, but for Wayne Hancock, it's cause for celebration. "It's the life that I like best ... so give me my guitar and I'll roam," the hillbilly-swing songwriter sings on "Man of the Road," one of many songs about highways, driving and trains that make up most of his most recent CD, "A-Town Blues" (on Bloodshot Records). "You can live like a king, man, and stay out here, stay in nice hotels every night," Hancock says in a phone call from, naturally, a hotel room.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When John Hancock signed the Declaration of Independence, he wrote his name in extra-large letters, saying that he wanted to be sure King George would be able to read it without his spectacles. Wayne Hancock brings a similar brash insistence to the world of country music. Like his patriotic namesake, Hancock is an agitator for revolution. The opponent isn't the British crown, but the established, Nashville-based powers who rule commercial country music.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM
Waylon Jennings once posed a rhetorical question in song, by way of throwing a barb at the reigning slickness in contemporary country music: "Do you think Hank done it this way?" More than any singer alive, Wayne Hancock can answer a resounding "yes." The raw-voiced little Texan's second album picks up where he left off on his 1995 debut, "Thunderstorms and Neon Signs," championing the themes and style of Hank Williams Sr., with some Jimmie Rodgers thrown in for good measure.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Traditional country singer Wayne "The Train" Hancock and rockabilly trio Russell Scott and the Red Hots offered some gritty slices of life Monday night at Linda's Doll Hut. In his earnest, thoroughly enjoyable two-hour set, Hancock, a 30-year-old based in Austin, Texas, used his love and knowledge of traditional hard-core country to transport us to a bygone era.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM
Waylon Jennings once posed a rhetorical question in song, by way of throwing a barb at the reigning slickness in contemporary country music: "Do you think Hank done it this way?" More than any singer alive, Wayne Hancock can answer a resounding "yes." The raw-voiced little Texan's second album picks up where he left off on his 1995 debut, "Thunderstorms and Neon Signs," championing the themes and style of Hank Williams Sr., with some Jimmie Rodgers thrown in for good measure.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2001
Gigi, "Gigi," Palm Wayne Hancock, "A-Town Blues," Bloodshot Hal Ketchum, "Lucky Man," Curb Love as Laughter, "Sea to Shining Sea," Sub Pop Roger McGuinn, "Treasures From the Folk Den," Appleseed Murder City Devils, "Thelema," Sub Pop Orbital, "The Altogether," ffrr/London/Sire Joshua Perahia, "Something to Say," M&K The Residents, "Icky Flix," East Side Digital Stanton Warriors, "The Stanton Session," XL Sunset Valley, "Icepond," Barsuk 3 Mustaphas 3, "Play Musty for Me," Omnium Caetano Veloso,
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN
* The Family Values Tour, featuring Limp Bizkit, right, with Fred Durst, Filter, the team of Redman and Method Man, Primus and System of a Down, comes to the Arrowhead Pond on Oct. 23. Tickets go on sale Saturday. . . . Jimmy Page joins forces with the Black Crowes Oct. 18-19 at the Greek Theatre. Tickets are available Sunday. . . . Tickets go on sale Saturday for two shows by the Pet Shop Boys, Oct. 30 at Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre and Nov. 1 at the Universal Amphitheatre. . . .
NEWS
August 11, 1994
"Chippy," which premiered this year in Philadelphia, is a theatrical production based on the diaries of a prostitute who worked the Texas Panhandle in the 1930s. "Songs From Chippy" is one of the best albums of the year in country music, or any other genre. It brings together one of the most accomplished fraternities of singer-songwriters in the United States, the Austin, Texas, old-buddy network centered around Joe Ely and Butch Hancock.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Traditional country singer Wayne "The Train" Hancock and rockabilly trio Russell Scott and the Red Hots offered some gritty slices of life Monday night at Linda's Doll Hut. In his earnest, thoroughly enjoyable two-hour set, Hancock, a 30-year-old based in Austin, Texas, used his love and knowledge of traditional hard-core country to transport us to a bygone era.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When John Hancock signed the Declaration of Independence, he wrote his name in extra-large letters, saying that he wanted to be sure King George would be able to read it without his spectacles. Wayne Hancock brings a similar brash insistence to the world of country music. Like his patriotic namesake, Hancock is an agitator for revolution. The opponent isn't the British crown, but the established, Nashville-based powers who rule commercial country music.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1996 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co. said Friday that it has agreed to sell its Sutro & Co. and Tucker Anthony Inc. stock-brokerage units to a group led by the firms' managers for $180 million. Sutro, headquartered in San Francisco, and Boston-based Tucker Anthony are respected but small, regional competitors in the securities industry, and Hancock said it's shedding the firms to focus on its core insurance lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2001
LAGUNA BEACH 6pm Art The cigar-box paintings by Ed Musante are recent works on display at the Campbell-Thiebaud Gallery. The mixed-media works take as their support either the lid or the bottom exterior of a wooden or cardboard cigar box. The artist then paints a single image of an animal, most often a bird, on each box or lid. * Cigar-box paintings by Ed Musante, Campbell-Thiebaud Gallery, Laguna Beach. Wednesday-Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
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