Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWayne Rainey
IN THE NEWS

Wayne Rainey

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
September 7, 1994 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crumpled face down in a sand pit at the Misano racing circuit after crashing, tumbling and cartwheeling at 130 m.p.h. in the Italian Grand Prix last September, Wayne Rainey thought he was dying. He heard the roar of motorcycles racing only a few yards away and thought they were going to run over him. He tried to get up. He couldn't. In 24 years of racing, Rainey had fallen many times, but only once before had he been unable to move his legs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
September 7, 2001 | SHAV GLICK
Speed is an addiction, and Wayne Rainey is an addict. It doesn't matter that he is paralyzed from the chest down from a motorcycle racing accident in 1993 at Italy's Misano circuit. Rainey, a three-time world Grand Prix road racing champion, was on his way to a fourth title when his bike careened out of control at 130 mph, sending him cartwheeling through the dirt and severing his spinal cord.
Advertisement
SPORTS
April 9, 1987 | SHAV GLICK
Motorcycle road racing champion Wayne Rainey, who got his start as a teen-ager racing on the dirt at Ascot Park, will return to Ascot and the dirt Saturday to ride in the 10th annual Grand National half-mile championship race. Rainey began the season by winning the Daytona 200, the most prestigious road race of the season, and last year was runner-up to Fred Merkel of Huntington Beach in the Camel Road Race Series for superbikes.
SPORTS
December 14, 1998 | SHAV GLICK
Wayne Rainey, a motorcycling kid from Downey, has experienced higher highs and lower lows than most people, and in his autobiography he shows both. Surprisingly, the high of winning world Grand Prix motorcycle championships had a down side, and the low of having his spinal cord snapped and facing life in a wheelchair brought some inspiring, upbeat moments.
SPORTS
December 14, 1998 | SHAV GLICK
Wayne Rainey, a motorcycling kid from Downey, has experienced higher highs and lower lows than most people, and in his autobiography he shows both. Surprisingly, the high of winning world Grand Prix motorcycle championships had a down side, and the low of having his spinal cord snapped and facing life in a wheelchair brought some inspiring, upbeat moments.
SPORTS
September 7, 1993 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday was to have been a homecoming for Wayne Rainey. The three-time world motorcycle road racing champion from Downey moved his family into a new home in the hills above Carmel Valley last March. From the 2 1/2-acre estate, he could look down on Laguna Seca Raceway, where Sunday he expected to be riding in a world championship Grand Prix he had won three times. Now things are on hold.
SPORTS
August 19, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Defending world champion Wayne Rainey beat fellow-American Kevin Schwantz and Michael Doohan of Australia in a 500-cc race of the San Marino Grand Prix at Scarperia, Italy.
SPORTS
May 15, 1989
The top 19 riders boycotted the 500-cc race of the Italian motorcycling Grand Prix in a dispute over track safety after a sudden rainstorm at Misano Adriatico, Italy. World champion Eddie Lawson and fellow-Americans Wayne Rainey, Kevin Schwantz, Randy Mamola, Freddie Spencer and Fred Merkel were among those who refused to compete in the fifth event of the 1989 World Championship.
SPORTS
May 19, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Thirteen top motorcycle riders, including five Americans, were fined $1,150 each for boycotting the 500-cc race of the Italian motorcycling Grand Prix at Misano Adriatico last Sunday. The Italian Motorcycling Federation said today that the fines were levied by an international jury and that the International Federation has been notified of the action. World champion Eddie Lawson and fellow Americans Kevin Schwantz, Freddie Spencer, Fred Merkel and Wayne Rainey were among the riders who refused to start in the race.
SPORTS
April 13, 1996 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Driving a Toyota Celica GT at 70 mph in a celebrity race isn't quite like racing a high-strung Yamaha 180 mph on a twisting world championship Grand Prix motorcycle road course, but for Wayne Rainey, it's a worthy challenge. "You should have seen his eyes light up when he got into his uniform and pulled his helmet on," said Rainey's father, Sandy, as the three-time world champion prepared to practice for today's Toyota Pro-Celebrity race as part of the Long Beach Grand Prix.
SPORTS
September 7, 1994 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crumpled face down in a sand pit at the Misano racing circuit after crashing, tumbling and cartwheeling at 130 m.p.h. in the Italian Grand Prix last September, Wayne Rainey thought he was dying. He heard the roar of motorcycles racing only a few yards away and thought they were going to run over him. He tried to get up. He couldn't. In 24 years of racing, Rainey had fallen many times, but only once before had he been unable to move his legs.
SPORTS
September 7, 1993 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday was to have been a homecoming for Wayne Rainey. The three-time world motorcycle road racing champion from Downey moved his family into a new home in the hills above Carmel Valley last March. From the 2 1/2-acre estate, he could look down on Laguna Seca Raceway, where Sunday he expected to be riding in a world championship Grand Prix he had won three times. Now things are on hold.
SPORTS
September 6, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Wayne Rainey of Downey, three-time defending world motorcycle road-racing champion, suffered a serious back injury Sunday after taking a bad spill during the Italian Motorcycle Grand Prix. Rainey, 32, skidded off a bend exiting turn 1 on the ninth lap while leading on his Yamaha at the Santamonica track. He landed heavily, his bike hitting him as he slid.
SPORTS
March 27, 1993 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international motorsports wall calendar for 1993, featuring Grand Prix motorcycles, has a picture of Wayne Rainey on its February page. Under it, the caption reads: "Injuries ended Wayne Rainey's chances of winning a third 500cc World Championship with the Team Marlboro Roberts Yamaha YZR5." Rainey did win it, but the caption writer could almost be excused for his error.
SPORTS
March 23, 1993 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international motorsports wall calendar for 1993, featuring Grand Prix motorcycles, has a picture of Wayne Rainey on its February page. Under it, the caption reads: "Injuries ended Wayne Rainey's chances of winning a third 500cc World Championship with the Team Marlboro Roberts Yamaha YZR5." Rainey did win it, but the caption writer could almost be excused for his error.
SPORTS
September 6, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Wayne Rainey of Downey, three-time defending world motorcycle road-racing champion, suffered a serious back injury Sunday after taking a bad spill during the Italian Motorcycle Grand Prix. Rainey, 32, skidded off a bend exiting turn 1 on the ninth lap while leading on his Yamaha at the Santamonica track. He landed heavily, his bike hitting him as he slid.
SPORTS
April 19, 1991 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
America-bashing often has been used to attract attention throughout the world, be it in politics, business or sports. Motorcycle racing is no exception. Australian rider Kevin Magee, after falling and suffering a head injury last year at Laguna Seca Raceway, near Monterey, blasted the track as being too dangerous and called on his fellow road racers to boycott the only United States stop of the world championship series.
SPORTS
August 19, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Defending world champion Wayne Rainey beat fellow-American Kevin Schwantz and Michael Doohan of Australia in a 500-cc race of the San Marino Grand Prix at Scarperia, Italy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|