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October 3, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her face was twisted with rage, her voice cracked with fury, her body cramped with hate. "They should be killed, all of them, killed. We will kill them. I will kill them." The murderous wail was aimed at Jean-Bertrand Aristide and the supporters who followed Haiti's first democratically elected president into exile when he was overthrown three years ago by the country's army. "They are everything that is wrong here," she shrieked as she contemplated their return. "They are the mob.
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NEWS
October 9, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They appeared before dawn Saturday with pickaxes and machetes in hand. And with pebbles and sticks, they staked their claims. There were dozens of them, impoverished slum dwellers from an urban hell called Cite Soleil--City of the Sun--and they worked all day carving new subdivisions into a rich man's land: a prime, verdant hillside adjacent to Port-au-Prince's international airport. It was a land seizure, plain and simple. People power, Haitian-style. The worst nightmare of Haiti's rich.
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NEWS
September 24, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior U.S. officials have initiated large-scale business negotiations with some of the most powerful and wealthy Haitian supporters of the military overthrow of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, according to Haitian business and political sources. The secret talks came this week at the same time the United States was dismantling the Haitian army and supposedly engineering a new political environment to undermine the power of the same anti-democratic elite. In one case, the sources said, Lt.
NEWS
October 3, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her face was twisted with rage, her voice cracked with fury, her body cramped with hate. "They should be killed, all of them, killed. We will kill them. I will kill them." The murderous wail was aimed at Jean-Bertrand Aristide and the supporters who followed Haiti's first democratically elected president into exile when he was overthrown three years ago by the country's army. "They are everything that is wrong here," she shrieked as she contemplated their return. "They are the mob.
NEWS
September 26, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the border crossing out of isolated, sanctions-bound Haiti opened to Richard Elie this weekend for the first time in months, the well-off Haitian American decided to go shopping. Big time. His list included dozens of high-priced items--from spare parts to high-tech goods--that have been banned from Haiti during its three years under economic sanctions.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They appeared before dawn Saturday with pickaxes and machetes in hand. And with pebbles and sticks, they staked their claims. There were dozens of them, impoverished slum dwellers from an urban hell called Cite Soleil--City of the Sun--and they worked all day carving new subdivisions into a rich man's land: a prime, verdant hillside adjacent to Port-au-Prince's international airport. It was a land seizure, plain and simple. People power, Haitian-style. The worst nightmare of Haiti's rich.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First went gasoline. Then it was the electricity and telephones. Now it's Baltic Mousse. Until now--and all through a series of international economic sanctions that have almost emptied Haiti's streets of vehicles and left the already beggared nation largely without power and telephones, with most of its people malnourished if not starving--the country's elite had counted on maintaining its usual privileges.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anyone who thinks economic embargoes don't work should come to Haiti, a land fast running out of fuel, electricity and patience. "This place is about to explode," is heard so often that it sounds like the national motto, along with, "The people just won't take much more."
NEWS
September 26, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the border crossing out of isolated, sanctions-bound Haiti opened to Richard Elie this weekend for the first time in months, the well-off Haitian American decided to go shopping. Big time. His list included dozens of high-priced items--from spare parts to high-tech goods--that have been banned from Haiti during its three years under economic sanctions.
NEWS
September 24, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior U.S. officials have initiated large-scale business negotiations with some of the most powerful and wealthy Haitian supporters of the military overthrow of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, according to Haitian business and political sources. The secret talks came this week at the same time the United States was dismantling the Haitian army and supposedly engineering a new political environment to undermine the power of the same anti-democratic elite. In one case, the sources said, Lt.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First went gasoline. Then it was the electricity and telephones. Now it's Baltic Mousse. Until now--and all through a series of international economic sanctions that have almost emptied Haiti's streets of vehicles and left the already beggared nation largely without power and telephones, with most of its people malnourished if not starving--the country's elite had counted on maintaining its usual privileges.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anyone who thinks economic embargoes don't work should come to Haiti, a land fast running out of fuel, electricity and patience. "This place is about to explode," is heard so often that it sounds like the national motto, along with, "The people just won't take much more."
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