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Weapons Industry Iraq

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NEWS
December 22, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior Iraqi official said Monday that a four-day air offensive by the United States and Britain destroyed two factories making parts for Iraq's short-range missile program and killed 62 military personnel, plus a "much, much higher" number of civilians. Deputy Prime Minister Tarik Aziz gave his government's first detailed account of military losses at an evening news conference, ridiculing U.S.
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NEWS
December 22, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior Iraqi official said Monday that a four-day air offensive by the United States and Britain destroyed two factories making parts for Iraq's short-range missile program and killed 62 military personnel, plus a "much, much higher" number of civilians. Deputy Prime Minister Tarik Aziz gave his government's first detailed account of military losses at an evening news conference, ridiculing U.S.
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NEWS
August 10, 1992 | From Reuters
A U.N. arms inspection team, barred by Baghdad from entering government ministries, completed its first day of searches Sunday without triggering a new standoff with Iraq. "It was an inspection day, the first one. That is all it was," Nikita Smidovich, head of the 22-member team, told reporters when the inspectors returned to their Baghdad hotel. "We went where we planned to go." Asked whether the team saw what it wanted to see, Smidovich said, "Yes."
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By concentrating on what remains of Iraq's weapons-making facilities, the United States and its allies have chosen a focus for their military and political firepower that offers almost unlimited targets for future operations if they are deemed necessary. Although U.N.
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By concentrating on what remains of Iraq's weapons-making facilities, the United States and its allies have chosen a focus for their military and political firepower that offers almost unlimited targets for future operations if they are deemed necessary. Although U.N.
NEWS
August 17, 1991
No specter has haunted the world before or after the Gulf War more than the prospect that Iraq and its ruthless leader, Saddam Hussein, might possess weapons of mass destruction. To ensure that nuclear, biologic and chemical caches had not eluded the rain of bombs unleashed by the U.S.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kurdish guerrillas and Saddam Hussein's troops clashed in northern Iraq, leaving as many as 500 dead or wounded in what appeared to be the most serious fighting since Iraq crushed the Kurdish rebellion in March, U.N. officials said Friday. The exact count of casualties was uncertain, but reports from the region reaching U.N. diplomats said Kurdish guerrillas, after two days of combat, had taken control of most of the northern Iraqi city of Sulaymaniyah.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As Americans watch U.S. warships, planes and troops in the Middle East, one of the most interesting questions they can ask about the troubled region is "where did all the money go?" Over the last six decades, oil has brought billions to the region. And still the area is unsettled and Iraqi ruler Saddam Hussein can strike a responsive chord with rhetoric about the rich Arab kingdoms and the poor Arab masses--and that's despite the fact that Iraq itself is oil rich.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Commerce Department approved millions of dollars in high-technology exports to an Iraqi research center after a classified Pentagon report warned on Nov. 6, 1986, that the nine-acre complex north of Baghdad was secretly developing missiles and weapons of mass destruction, according to government sources familiar with the report.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | From Reuters
A U.N. arms inspection team, barred by Baghdad from entering government ministries, completed its first day of searches Sunday without triggering a new standoff with Iraq. "It was an inspection day, the first one. That is all it was," Nikita Smidovich, head of the 22-member team, told reporters when the inspectors returned to their Baghdad hotel. "We went where we planned to go." Asked whether the team saw what it wanted to see, Smidovich said, "Yes."
NEWS
August 17, 1991
No specter has haunted the world before or after the Gulf War more than the prospect that Iraq and its ruthless leader, Saddam Hussein, might possess weapons of mass destruction. To ensure that nuclear, biologic and chemical caches had not eluded the rain of bombs unleashed by the U.S.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kurdish guerrillas and Saddam Hussein's troops clashed in northern Iraq, leaving as many as 500 dead or wounded in what appeared to be the most serious fighting since Iraq crushed the Kurdish rebellion in March, U.N. officials said Friday. The exact count of casualties was uncertain, but reports from the region reaching U.N. diplomats said Kurdish guerrillas, after two days of combat, had taken control of most of the northern Iraqi city of Sulaymaniyah.
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