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Weapons Smuggling

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG
An Idaho man who admitted trying to sell undercover agents military cannons for use by a Colombian drug cartel was sentenced Monday to five months in prison and five months of home detention. Steven L. Picatti, 54, of Boise, pleaded guilty last year to federal charges of conspiracy and illegal transfer of a destructive device. He was arrested near Van Nuys Airport in a sting operation conducted by the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms and the U.S. Customs Service.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weak, tired and suffering the effects of enduring 39 days of captivity in Mexico on weapons charges, Scott McClung arrived home three months ago seeking to resume the life of a charter boat captain. Since then, McClung has taken on a new role: media darling. The Newport Beach man has been interviewed by numerous newspaper reporters and was featured on television's "Inside Edition" and the Rev. Robert H. Schuller's "Hour of Power." Even NBC's "Dateline" has shown an interest.
WORLD
June 27, 2007 | From Reuters
Lebanon's border security is largely incapable of preventing arms smuggling from Syria, experts said Tuesday in a scathing report for the U.N. Security Council. The five independent experts said that during a three-week stay in Lebanon they had not heard of any weapons being seized. The team did not visit Syria, which has denied involvement in any illegal transfers.
WORLD
December 24, 2007 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. ambassador expressed wariness Sunday about Iranian intentions in Iraq, saying that even if Iran-backed militias had decreased activities here, he was not yet convinced the Islamic state was committed to helping stabilize Iraq. U.S. military officials have cited the recent drop in roadside bombs and mortar and rocket attacks as a sign that Iran, which Washington accuses of fomenting unrest in Iraq, is altering its behavior.
WORLD
November 16, 2007 | Ned Parker, Times Staff Writer
Iran appears to be honoring an informal pledge to try to halt the smuggling of explosives and other weapons into Iraq, contributing to a decline in bombings by more than half since March, a senior U.S. general told reporters Thursday. "We have not seen any recent evidence that weapons continue to come across the border into Iraq," Maj. Gen. James Simmons said. "We believe that the initiatives and the commitments that the Iranians have made appear to be holding up."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sailor Scott McClung stoically endured 39 days in captivity and faced a possible three decades in a Mexican prison, struggling all the while to remain strong, to keep his faith alive. Now a free man, he finally dissolved in tears Wednesday when he piloted his 145-foot ship, the Rapture, into Newport Harbor--where horns blasted and hundreds of people cheered--stepped onto the dock and spotted his dog, Mel. "Hey, buddy," McClung said as the 150-pound Newfoundland greeted him with a wet kiss.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | Reuters
The parents of a woman killed in the bombing of a Pan Am jet over Lockerbie, Scotland, said Friday they had smuggled a plastic explosive onto a domestic flight to prove that airline and airport security remain lax. Carole Johnson, whose daughter Beth Ann was among the 270 people killed in the 1988 bombing, said in a television interview that she and her husband had successfully carried the explosive onto a USAir flight leaving Boston's Logan Airport last Saturday.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | Associated Press
A federal judge on Friday refused to dismiss criminal charges against a former CIA agent accused of conspiring to ship arms illegally to the Nicaraguan rebels and concealing the covert operation. U.S. District Judge Aubrey E. Robinson Jr. denied a motion to dismiss the charges against Joseph F. Fernandez, who contended that the congressional testimony he gave under a limited grant of immunity from prosecution was improperly used against him by prosecutors.
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