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NEWS
May 23, 1991 | From Associated Press
The government banned spears in strife-torn black townships Wednesday, but its plans for a major summit to resolve political violence suffered a setback when church leaders said they will not attend. The South African Council of Churches said the conference would not accomplish much without participation of all major political groups.
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NEWS
May 23, 1991 | From Associated Press
The government banned spears in strife-torn black townships Wednesday, but its plans for a major summit to resolve political violence suffered a setback when church leaders said they will not attend. The South African Council of Churches said the conference would not accomplish much without participation of all major political groups.
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NEWS
December 20, 1985
South African troops ventured into Angola for the third time since a formal withdrawal in April, killing at least six black guerrillas and capturing weapons, South Africa's television reported. The South African Broadcasting Corp. based its report on information from "diplomatic sources in Africa." South African officials declined to comment on the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1990
A former aerospace research firm executive was indicted Thursday in Los Angeles on charges he allegedly exported sensitive information on the "Star Wars" weapons system to Japan. The federal grand jury indictment charges Ronald Hoffman, 51, of Los Angeles, with illegally exporting technical data relating to arms, ammunition and implements of war and lying on export control documents.
OPINION
July 28, 2005 | Jacob Heilbrunn
The notion that President Bush blundered in promising to help India develop its nuclear energy program is understandable, widespread -- and wrong. With the Pentagon warning in a new assessment of the long-term threat posed by China's military buildup, and a Chinese general huffing about lobbing nuclear weapons at the U.S. (although Beijing officially and predictably said he wasn't speaking for the government), Bush's move is long overdue.
NEWS
April 3, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli arms merchants, almost certainly with the approval of their government, regularly violated the U.N. embargo on arms sales to South Africa for almost a decade before the government called a halt to the traffic last month, the State Department reported Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1987
The arms industries in six Western nations and in Israel have continued to supply weapons to South Africa despite commitments of the seven governments to adhere to the mandatory sanctions imposed by the United Nations, the State Department has reported to Congress. In addition, sources within the State Department have reported that Israel made available military personnel to instruct South Africans in conventional military tactics and anti-terrorism procedures.
NEWS
July 13, 1985 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The White House on Friday attacked legislation, overwhelmingly passed by the Republican-led Senate, that would impose economic penalties on South Africa unless it ends its policy of racial discrimination. Sanctions are the "wrong way to bring about changes we all desire," presidential spokesman Larry Speakes said in insisting that the Reagan Administration's approach of "quiet diplomacy" still is the best way to proceed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1988 | ERNEST CONINE, Ernest Conine writes a column for The Times
The United States and the Soviet Union seem to be cranking down their nuclear-arms race. But another nuclear-missile race may be just down the road--this one among Third World countries. Many experts have long felt that if nuclear war ever comes it won't start with a surprise attack by one superpower on the other. It is more likely to begin with a nuclear exchange between two Third World adversaries, with the obvious danger that the United States and the Soviet Union would be drawn in.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk confirmed long-held suspicions about South Africa's nuclear capability Wednesday, revealing that the white-minority government had built six nuclear bombs since the late 1970s but, three years ago, had destroyed them along with all their blueprints. "This country will never be able to build a nuclear device again," De Klerk said after making his announcement to a joint session of Parliament in Cape Town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1985
When President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev met at the summit last week, one of the so-called "minor" accomplishments was a joint declaration of intent to cooperate in discouraging the spread of nuclear weapons in the world. Actually, the two great powers have been cooperating in this area for several years. The need for even greater cooperation is evident.
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