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Weapons Tests

NEWS
March 4, 1998 | Associated Press
The government will spend $2.2 billion over the next 16 years cleaning up sections of the Nevada Test Site, according to a revised Energy Department plan. The work will be carried out on certain sections of the site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, where the nation conducted nuclear weapons tests from 1951 to 1992. At the same time, the Energy Department will continue to ship low-level nuclear waste from department sites across the country for storage at the test site through 2070.
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NEWS
August 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
The president of the republic of Kazakhstan on Thursday issued a decree closing a major Soviet nuclear weapons testing range. Kazakhs, alarmed that their mighty Russian neighbor wants to renegotiate their long border, demonstrated throughout the republic, located on the Soviet Union's southern steppes. Russian Vice President Alexander Rutskoi hurried to the Kazakh capital, Alma Ata, to ease their fears, as did a delegation dispatched by Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | United Press International
Scientists triggered a nuclear weapon beneath the Nevada desert Saturday, less than 24 hours after the Soviet Union announced a nuclear detonation at its Central Asian test site. The Easter weekend tests were the fourth nuclear detonations of 1987 for each country. Chris West of the U.S. Department of Energy said Saturday's weapon experiment, code-named Delama, was conducted at 6:40 a.m.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Survivors of government employees who developed cancer after exposure to radiation from atmospheric nuclear testing cannot sue the government or its contractors for damages, a federal appeals court ruled Monday. In a landmark decision that could bar legal compensation for an estimated 250,000 workers who may have been exposed to radiation during atomic weapons testing in the 1950s, the U.S.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Les Aspin on Thursday denied allegations that the Pentagon once rigged missile tests for the "Star Wars" program, but he pledged to give Congress a full appraisal of future weapons tests. "I guarantee that while I am here, Defense Department tests will be conducted honestly and reported honestly," Aspin said.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Fallout from the more than 100 above-ground nuclear weapons tests in Nevada between 1951 and 1958 may have been responsible for a small percentage of the deaths from leukemia in Utah between 1952 and 1981, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Utah and the USC Medical School. The study, which will be published next week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., confirms the results of previous studies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1994 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an immense steel vault bathed in eerie blue light and protected around the clock by armed guards, the Air Force's latest fighter jet was being tricked into thinking it was in the heat of high-tech combat. The F-16 Falcon sat motionless on a huge turntable at Edwards Air Force Base as computer technicians bombarded it with electronic signals mimicking enemy missiles and radar stations, simulating a flight over hostile territory.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The community around the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station roared like seldom before with the unveiling of a $200-million plan to expand the coastal base. Everybody, even conservative Congressman Dana Rohrabacher, seemed to agree: bad idea. Surf would be ruined. Beaches would be eroded. Ocean views would be pockmarked by more ships. More missiles could mean greater chances of accidental explosions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1998
Re "Coming Out From Gandhi's Shadow," by Vinay Lal, Commentary, May 19: Mahatma Gandhi's theory of nonviolence was a wonderful tool to fight the British Empire. It worked in no small part due to the civilized British concept of fair play. Nonviolence would never have worked in the era of Mogul ruler Aurangzeb, or during the reign of Hitler. Lal is being indescribably naive if he believes that nonviolence is going to preserve and protect Indian culture and India from the dangers it faces in the likes of the Muslim fundamentalists of Pakistan and China's expansionist vision.
OPINION
October 6, 1991 | Scott Shuger, Scott Shuger is a contributing editor to the Washington Monthly
Ideally, if you want to find out if an assumption is true or if a machine works, you test it, using people knowledgeable enough to read the test results and impartial enough not to care how they come out. The Pentagon does things differently, though. Whenever possible, it prefers not testing its weapons, but, when forced to do so, it will sacrifice knowledge to ensure the tests remain in biased hands.
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