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Weather Statistics

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2000 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A storm that dropped nearly an inch of rain on some parts of Orange County on Wednesday has caused at least one expert to soften previous assessments of the area's "drought-like" season. "I wouldn't call it a drought, but a dry spell," said Stacey Johnstone, a meteorologist for WeatherData Inc., which provides forecasts for The Times. "I think what you'll end up with is a season that's a little drier than normal, but definitely not a drought."
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NEWS
December 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The year 2000 is ending on a nippy note for much of the nation, but overall the country's temperatures were above normal for the year. Although the final measurement will depend on conditions during the remaining two weeks, the average U.S. temperature in 2000 is projected to be 54.1 or 54.2 degrees Fahrenheit, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Monday. That's well above the long-term average of 52.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2000 | JEFF GETTLEMAN and CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The meteorological season has come to a close, and scientists studying Southern California weather patterns have boiled down reams of data to two conclusions: The last 12 months were warm and, for the most part, dry. According to the data, the elements in Southern California behaved obediently in the July 1-June 30 weather season, closely following the celebrated pattern of sunshine and more sunshine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2000 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first storm of the new millennium passed through Orange County on Tuesday, filling flood-control channels with runoff and making wind chimes jingle but barely affecting the area's yearlong drought. "It didn't make much of a dent--sorry," said Amy Talmage, a meteorologist with WeatherData Inc., which provides forecasts for The Times. "If I could have made the rain harder, I would have."
NEWS
November 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Temperatures plunged well below zero and combined with blowing snow, sending residents across the Rockies and northern Plains scrambling for wool sweaters and parkas. The mercury in thermometers in Casper, Wyo., hit 19 degrees below zero, shattering the town's record for the date of zero degrees, set in 1995. Parts of North Dakota also stayed in the single digits, and icy temperatures dipped as far south as Colorado, Nebraska and Iowa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1996 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC) Drop in the Bucket Although at least half an inch of rain fell around much of the county Wednesday, this season's total still lags well behind the norm. Wednesday recordings, in inches: * Dana Point: .39 Laguna Beach: .40 Lake Forest: .61 Newport Beach: .48 San Juan Capistrano: .50 Santa Ana: .88 * Season to Date Rainfall for the season to date is a little more than half what would normally fall and 12 inches less than received last year: * This season: 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1996 | ED BOND
San Fernando Valley residents can expect a break from the recent rains this week, but how long it will last was uncertain. "It's just a lull between the storms," said Bruce Rockwell, a spokesman for the National Weather Service in Oxnard. "There's quite a lot of moisture out there." Showers expected this morning should lift later in the day. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday are expected to be dry with some low clouds along the coast. But forecasters were unsure about what might happen Friday.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | PETER H. KING
Monday I stayed in bed, sick with the flu. A good citizen, I watched the O.J. Simpson trial on television. This did nothing to make me feel better, about anything, in any way. So on Tuesday I ventured into the storm-battered Sierra, prepared to wade into California's second-most favorite conversational topic--the weather. For those who've been unable to break away from The Trial, here is a bulletin: In the world outside Department 103, it rained or snowed straight through most of January.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Even if forecasts hold true and a big storm finally kicks off California's rainy season this week, there is almost no chance for a normal winter, a conference of hydrologists was told Saturday. "The odds are against it coming out normal," state meteorologist William Mork said at Mammoth Mountain. "Any way you cut it, we have never seen a fall this dry." In Santa Monica, beach sand was hauled in for an annual event that usually features 50 to 100 tons of snow trucked in from Mammoth.
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