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October 30, 2008 | DAVID SARNO
We already know this is the year of the first "YouTube election," where the most reliable place to find the latest footage everyone was talking about was no longer CNN, Fox News or the broadcast networks but rather from one of 10 dozen websites that undoubtedly already had the clip parsed, posted and ready for inhalation. The Web has become a political junkie's cornucopia, overflowing with excerpts of every kind. If you're like me, you yearn for the good old days, when October meant being bombarded with a small number of expensive political advertisements -- the ones that just told us what to believe already, so we didn't have to waste time figuring it out. But all is not lost.
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BUSINESS
July 11, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Nine studio executives sat in a glass-enclosed conference room in Beverly Hills, discussing potential snowy locales for filming later this year. Utah was a viable option, advised the head of production. So, too, was upstate New York — in part because of tax credits. Over the course of the hourlong production meeting, the executives also received casting updates, discussed social media plans for one soon-to-debut series and mulled over a festival screening strategy for another project.
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OPINION
October 19, 2010 | By David J. Aleshire
In his Oct. 12 Times Op-Ed article, "Fixing Bell," respected Ventura City Manager Rick Cole calls on Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown to request a court-appointment receiver to manage the troubled Los Angeles County city. One of the online comments to the article says, "While you're at it Jerry, appoint one for the state as well for the recent budget fiasco. " Exactly. The state is not a model of governance for California. Bell should not expect salvation from Sacramento. The solution for Bell is within view, as residents are in the process of recalling four discredited City Council members.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tabloid City A Novel Pete Hamill Little, Brown: 278 pp., $26.99 There's murder and mayhem in Pete Hamill's latest novel, "Tabloid City," but the real victim in his book is the print journalism that Hamill knows and loves so well. This ticking time bomb of a novel is about the end of a form of daily storytelling in which America's big cities are like small towns — their recognizable casts of characters, dramas and moral struggles playing out on a slightly bigger, more complex stage.
OPINION
July 7, 2010 | By Mark Elliot
In "Shaping the city of L.A." on July 2, The Times' editorial board declares, "Now is the time ... to streamline the land use process and make it smarter and more efficient." At the same time, it urges policymakers to "take charge" and commit to a vision for community planning. The Times cannot have its cake and eat it too. Which will it be: a streamlined process and quick approvals, or a deliberative approach to deciding the future of our city? Five years ago, when Gail Goldberg came to the Planning Department, confidence in the planning process was at an all-time low. Department underperformance had soured neighborhoods, and faith in the mayor himself had ebbed.
OPINION
December 14, 2010 | By Leslie Evans
The Times should be congratulated for opposing Assembly Speaker John A. Peréz's proposed legislation to unincorporate the city of Vernon. The Times, however, repeats several commonly cited arguments against Vernon that contribute to the unnecessary hue and cry for the city's dissolution. The Times states as fact that the city is "run largely for the benefit of its 2,000 businesses and two founding families. " First, there should be nothing wrong with an industrial city with virtually no other residents being run for the benefit of its business community.
OPINION
August 16, 2010 | By Bob Niccum
In his Aug. 11 Times Op-Ed article, "City of Bell salaries: Robert Rizzo is only a symptom," Ben Boychuk confronts the wrong end of the beast. He tips us off to his bias by repeatedly flogging the crusty cliche "unelected bureaucrats," on whom he blames the current crisis in state and local government. He then twists logic into a knot by using these specious assertions as a pretext for removing regulations to solve the problem. Huh? Bell's scandal over high salaries for its top officials did not arise because too many regulations and statutes exist.
OPINION
October 29, 2010 | By Dan Rush
Critics of Proposition 19,- which would legalize the private possession of limited quantities of marijuana by adults and allow local governments to regulate its commercial production and retail distribution, will do and say just about anything. Case in point: Radio ads sponsored by the California Chamber of Commerce allege that passage of the measure will threaten workplace safety, a campaign The Times reported on in an Oct. 27 article . The claim is a bald-faced lie. Proposition 19 seeks to decriminalize private, adult cannabis consumption while preserving existing legal prohibitions on activities that threaten public safety.
OPINION
July 3, 2010 | By Leland J. Bellot
As a professional historian and longtime teacher of European and world history I must take issue with one aspect of Rabbi Marvin Hier's welcome June 29 op-ed, "Holocaust: A huge word made small." He is quite correct in insisting that the horrendous historical phenomenon known as the "Holocaust" not be distorted and demeaned by its use in trivialized political and nonpolitical analogies. However, he extends his brief too broadly — apparently to encompass within his objection any analogous reference to the Nazi regime.
BOOKS
July 20, 2008
Fiction 1. Out Stealing Horses by Per Petterson ($14) 2. Loving Frank by Nancy Horan ($14) 3. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen ($13.95) 4. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho ($13.95) 5. On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan ($13.95) 6. Away by Amy Bloom ($14) 7. The Shack by William P. Young ($14.99) 8. In the Woods by Tana French ($14) 9. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini ($16) 10. The Book of Air and Shadows by Michael Gruber ($14.95) Nonfiction 1. A New Earth by Eckhart Tolle ($14) 2.
OPINION
December 14, 2010 | By Leslie Evans
The Times should be congratulated for opposing Assembly Speaker John A. Peréz's proposed legislation to unincorporate the city of Vernon. The Times, however, repeats several commonly cited arguments against Vernon that contribute to the unnecessary hue and cry for the city's dissolution. The Times states as fact that the city is "run largely for the benefit of its 2,000 businesses and two founding families. " First, there should be nothing wrong with an industrial city with virtually no other residents being run for the benefit of its business community.
OPINION
October 29, 2010 | By Dan Rush
Critics of Proposition 19,- which would legalize the private possession of limited quantities of marijuana by adults and allow local governments to regulate its commercial production and retail distribution, will do and say just about anything. Case in point: Radio ads sponsored by the California Chamber of Commerce allege that passage of the measure will threaten workplace safety, a campaign The Times reported on in an Oct. 27 article . The claim is a bald-faced lie. Proposition 19 seeks to decriminalize private, adult cannabis consumption while preserving existing legal prohibitions on activities that threaten public safety.
OPINION
October 19, 2010 | By David J. Aleshire
In his Oct. 12 Times Op-Ed article, "Fixing Bell," respected Ventura City Manager Rick Cole calls on Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown to request a court-appointment receiver to manage the troubled Los Angeles County city. One of the online comments to the article says, "While you're at it Jerry, appoint one for the state as well for the recent budget fiasco. " Exactly. The state is not a model of governance for California. Bell should not expect salvation from Sacramento. The solution for Bell is within view, as residents are in the process of recalling four discredited City Council members.
OPINION
August 16, 2010 | By Bob Niccum
In his Aug. 11 Times Op-Ed article, "City of Bell salaries: Robert Rizzo is only a symptom," Ben Boychuk confronts the wrong end of the beast. He tips us off to his bias by repeatedly flogging the crusty cliche "unelected bureaucrats," on whom he blames the current crisis in state and local government. He then twists logic into a knot by using these specious assertions as a pretext for removing regulations to solve the problem. Huh? Bell's scandal over high salaries for its top officials did not arise because too many regulations and statutes exist.
OPINION
July 7, 2010 | By Mark Elliot
In "Shaping the city of L.A." on July 2, The Times' editorial board declares, "Now is the time ... to streamline the land use process and make it smarter and more efficient." At the same time, it urges policymakers to "take charge" and commit to a vision for community planning. The Times cannot have its cake and eat it too. Which will it be: a streamlined process and quick approvals, or a deliberative approach to deciding the future of our city? Five years ago, when Gail Goldberg came to the Planning Department, confidence in the planning process was at an all-time low. Department underperformance had soured neighborhoods, and faith in the mayor himself had ebbed.
OPINION
July 3, 2010 | By Leland J. Bellot
As a professional historian and longtime teacher of European and world history I must take issue with one aspect of Rabbi Marvin Hier's welcome June 29 op-ed, "Holocaust: A huge word made small." He is quite correct in insisting that the horrendous historical phenomenon known as the "Holocaust" not be distorted and demeaned by its use in trivialized political and nonpolitical analogies. However, he extends his brief too broadly — apparently to encompass within his objection any analogous reference to the Nazi regime.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Hot Springs A Novel Geoffrey Becker Tin House Books: 318 pp., $14.95 paper I call them papercut writers -- brave souls who just about make us bleed, writing on the edge of what we can stand. A reader is lulled into trotting along to the edge of darkness with characters who, gosh, officer, they seemed normal. Who are we to judge? What do we really know about other people's lives? This Bernice character in "Hot Springs," a young woman who has given up her baby for adoption and cons her boyfriend into helping her kidnap the child five years later . . . is she crazy?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2007 | David Sarno, Times Staff Writer
What's wrong with this picture? On the first night of November, a group of about 15 professors, graduate students and film school alumni half-filled USC's tiny Ron Howard Theater. They came for a sneak preview of the much-anticipated Web series "quarterlife," an event hosted by the show's co-writer and director, Marshall Herskovitz. "Quarterlife" is about kids a few years out of college trying to find their way in the real world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2010
After nearly 40 years of broadcasting catchy little tunes celebrating everything from dogs getting run over by lawnmowers to cockroaches devouring entire cities, Dr. Demento is discontinuing his syndicated radio show. By summer's end, the good doctor's hyper-enthusiastic voice will be heard only on the Internet as it introduces oddball classics such as "There's a Fungus Among Us," "Fish Heads" and "Dead Puppies." For decades, Demento — who in a parallel life is Barret Hansen, 69 — has been a Sunday-night fixture on radio stations across the country, keeping alive the music of political satirists like Tom Lehrer ("The Vatican Rag")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Model Home A Novel Eric Puchner Scribner: 360 pp., $25 Eric Puchner mines the same landscape as Rick Moody and many others in American literature: the mind-numbing, striving, denial and greed of suburbia. "Model Home" is set in Southern California in the 1980s. There's a glare in the book, something you can't quite look at or into, and plenty of humor (the grim kind). The landscape is relentlessly bereft: mini-malls and gated communities and freeways. Warren Ziller, a real estate developer (scheister)
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