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OPINION
February 15, 2011 | By Julie Holland
As a physician who has researched and written extensively about MDMA, I took a keen interest in the Ecstasy fact card controversy developing in Los Angeles. The Los Angeles Department of Public Health is taking quite a bit of heat right now for the card it created to be distributed at large-scale rave dance parties in the city, as reported in a Feb. 8 L.A. Now blog post. The fact card explains the physical effects of Ecstasy, the risks involved in its use and how to reduce these risks, including by choosing not to take the substance at all. These cards were developed and approved by a panel of experts, including physicians, public health experts and harm reductionists.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 11, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Nine studio executives sat in a glass-enclosed conference room in Beverly Hills, discussing potential snowy locales for filming later this year. Utah was a viable option, advised the head of production. So, too, was upstate New York — in part because of tax credits. Over the course of the hourlong production meeting, the executives also received casting updates, discussed social media plans for one soon-to-debut series and mulled over a festival screening strategy for another project.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2008 | DAVID SARNO
We already know this is the year of the first "YouTube election," where the most reliable place to find the latest footage everyone was talking about was no longer CNN, Fox News or the broadcast networks but rather from one of 10 dozen websites that undoubtedly already had the clip parsed, posted and ready for inhalation. The Web has become a political junkie's cornucopia, overflowing with excerpts of every kind. If you're like me, you yearn for the good old days, when October meant being bombarded with a small number of expensive political advertisements -- the ones that just told us what to believe already, so we didn't have to waste time figuring it out. But all is not lost.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tabloid City A Novel Pete Hamill Little, Brown: 278 pp., $26.99 There's murder and mayhem in Pete Hamill's latest novel, "Tabloid City," but the real victim in his book is the print journalism that Hamill knows and loves so well. This ticking time bomb of a novel is about the end of a form of daily storytelling in which America's big cities are like small towns — their recognizable casts of characters, dramas and moral struggles playing out on a slightly bigger, more complex stage.
OPINION
July 13, 2010 | By Michelle
Thanks for your July 4 Op-Ed regarding the 75th anniversary of Alcoholics Anonymous, "In the end, it's just one drunk talking to another." I too am a sober member of A.A.; my sobriety date is June 16, 2003. The article by "Chaz" was accompanied in the newspaper by an illustration depicting various images supposedly related to A.A. Disturbingly, it included a picture of Jesus Christ, or perhaps some other religious figure with a Christian connotation. My grave concern is that, by publishing Christian art (or art with any religious imagery, regardless of origin)
OPINION
October 19, 2010 | By David J. Aleshire
In his Oct. 12 Times Op-Ed article, "Fixing Bell," respected Ventura City Manager Rick Cole calls on Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown to request a court-appointment receiver to manage the troubled Los Angeles County city. One of the online comments to the article says, "While you're at it Jerry, appoint one for the state as well for the recent budget fiasco. " Exactly. The state is not a model of governance for California. Bell should not expect salvation from Sacramento. The solution for Bell is within view, as residents are in the process of recalling four discredited City Council members.
OPINION
July 7, 2010 | By Mark Elliot
In "Shaping the city of L.A." on July 2, The Times' editorial board declares, "Now is the time ... to streamline the land use process and make it smarter and more efficient." At the same time, it urges policymakers to "take charge" and commit to a vision for community planning. The Times cannot have its cake and eat it too. Which will it be: a streamlined process and quick approvals, or a deliberative approach to deciding the future of our city? Five years ago, when Gail Goldberg came to the Planning Department, confidence in the planning process was at an all-time low. Department underperformance had soured neighborhoods, and faith in the mayor himself had ebbed.
OPINION
September 14, 2010 | By Maurice Salter and Richard M. Rosenberg
A bill in Sacramento supported by The Times' editorial page ("Fundraising, with limits," Sept. 8) turns out to be, on closer inspection, a poster child for the law of unintended consequences. It deserves rejection by the governor. The bill, SB 330, would subject private charitable organizations that raise scholarship funds and other philanthropic resources for public college and university campuses to the state Public Records Act. Sounds good, until you look at the details. At the University of California, campus foundations are nonprofit, nongovernmental entities overseen by volunteer boards.
OPINION
December 14, 2010 | By Leslie Evans
The Times should be congratulated for opposing Assembly Speaker John A. Peréz's proposed legislation to unincorporate the city of Vernon. The Times, however, repeats several commonly cited arguments against Vernon that contribute to the unnecessary hue and cry for the city's dissolution. The Times states as fact that the city is "run largely for the benefit of its 2,000 businesses and two founding families. " First, there should be nothing wrong with an industrial city with virtually no other residents being run for the benefit of its business community.
OPINION
August 16, 2010 | By Bob Niccum
In his Aug. 11 Times Op-Ed article, "City of Bell salaries: Robert Rizzo is only a symptom," Ben Boychuk confronts the wrong end of the beast. He tips us off to his bias by repeatedly flogging the crusty cliche "unelected bureaucrats," on whom he blames the current crisis in state and local government. He then twists logic into a knot by using these specious assertions as a pretext for removing regulations to solve the problem. Huh? Bell's scandal over high salaries for its top officials did not arise because too many regulations and statutes exist.
OPINION
February 15, 2011 | By Julie Holland
As a physician who has researched and written extensively about MDMA, I took a keen interest in the Ecstasy fact card controversy developing in Los Angeles. The Los Angeles Department of Public Health is taking quite a bit of heat right now for the card it created to be distributed at large-scale rave dance parties in the city, as reported in a Feb. 8 L.A. Now blog post. The fact card explains the physical effects of Ecstasy, the risks involved in its use and how to reduce these risks, including by choosing not to take the substance at all. These cards were developed and approved by a panel of experts, including physicians, public health experts and harm reductionists.
OPINION
January 28, 2011 | By Josh Ruebner
Aaron David Miller, a former Israeli-Palestinian "peace process" point person in the George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush administrations, is correct to assert in his Jan. 26 Times Op-Ed article that the recent cache of formerly secret documents on Israeli-Palestinian negotiations leaked to Al Jazeera "are bound to have a chilling effect on a process already in the deep freeze. " He errs, however, in lamenting the potential demise of a U.S.-sponsored "peace process" that is premised on Israel's demands, not Palestinian rights.
OPINION
January 14, 2011 | By Monica B. Morris
In her Jan. 9 Times Op-Ed article, " Tighter belts, later bumps ," Elizabeth Gregory writes that the trend of delaying motherhood is a good thing, as doing so allows women to complete their educations and establish themselves in careers. Later parenting certainly has advantages for parents, who may feel themselves more stable, financially and emotionally, to rear children. Nowhere, though, does Gregory consider later parenting from the children's viewpoints. My interviews with now-adult children born to comparatively older parents reveal some negatives in addition to the positives.
OPINION
December 14, 2010 | By Leslie Evans
The Times should be congratulated for opposing Assembly Speaker John A. Peréz's proposed legislation to unincorporate the city of Vernon. The Times, however, repeats several commonly cited arguments against Vernon that contribute to the unnecessary hue and cry for the city's dissolution. The Times states as fact that the city is "run largely for the benefit of its 2,000 businesses and two founding families. " First, there should be nothing wrong with an industrial city with virtually no other residents being run for the benefit of its business community.
OPINION
December 10, 2010 | By Osamah Khalil
As Hurricane Katrina demonstrated the misplaced priorities of the George W. Bush administration, the Carmel fire has similarly exposed the reality of Israel's domestic and foreign policy priorities. Rather than address these issues in his Dec. 7 Op-Ed article, Israeli Ambassador Michael B. Oren instead used the tragedy for cheap political gain. While Oren extolled the possible benefits of "enlightened cooperation" to achieve peace, he and the government he represents ignore that enlightened policies not only lead to cooperation and peace but are the requisite precursor.
OPINION
December 1, 2010 | By Gail Markels and George Rose
Just as the credits are about to roll on Arnold Schwarzenegger's tenure as governor, Pepperdine University constitutional law professor Barry P. McDonald granted him an 11th-hour pardon for having gotten there by being so good at making ultraviolent action films. McDonald seemingly absolves the Governator for his on-screen murders, assaults and mayhem because he helped push to the U.S. Supreme Court an appeal defending an ambiguous law punishing sales of so-called violent video games to minors.
OPINION
July 1, 2010 | By Rich Bengloff
The June 29 editorial about a court absolving YouTube of liability for copyright infringement asserts that for the Internet to work, YouTube can't be required to police the behavior on its service. The piece does not acknowledge that if YouTube-type services do not screen the music that users post on their sites, then music creators must turn into Internet police. Otherwise these creators may not be fairly compensated for their musical works.  YouTube adds 24 hours of new video content each minute of every day, much of it user-generated.
OPINION
July 9, 2010 | Luisa Goodwin
The headline on Andrew Blankstein's article on July 3, " LAPD's 911 operators stage a sickout," has a glaring omission: The sickout was not the idea of dispatchers who work for the Communications Division. I know because I am one. While some of those employees participated, this sickout was staged and directed by the Coalition of LA City Unions. It focused on a wide range of city workers in danger of being furloughed or laid off, not just dispatchers. It is unfair for Blankstein to lay the blame on our shoulders alone.
OPINION
November 20, 2010 | By Patrick Smith
The deployment of body scanners at U.S. airports is rightly controversial. The devices raise very important privacy issues, and possibly health issues as well, both of which The Times' Nov. 17 editorial "Shut up and be scanned" says are outweighed by security concerns. One downside to this debate, however, is that it distracts us somewhat from asking important questions about the Transportation Security Administration's approach to security overall. The scanners are part and parcel of what has become an unsustainable security strategy; that is, treating each and every passenger, whether an infant child or a uniformed crew member, as a potential terrorist, while attempting to inspect their bodies and belongings for each and every possible weapon.
OPINION
November 18, 2010 | By Patrick Mattimore
The United States attracts more international college students ? 691,000 last year ? than any other country. Recognizing a chance to plug some financial holes, the University of California system is attempting to boost enrollment of non-Californians by recruiting some of those foreign students ("UC campuses move to recruit more out-of-state students," Nov. 14). California is a particularly attractive option to international families seeking to send their children to world-class universities.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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