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BUSINESS
December 21, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Websense Inc., a maker of software to monitor employees' Internet use, agreed to buy Palo Alto-based PortAuthority Technologies Inc. for about $90 million in cash to add business software that prevents leaks of confidential information. The acquisition is expected to cut profit by 10 cents to 15 cents a share in 2007 and add slightly to earnings in 2008, San Diego-based Websense said.
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BUSINESS
December 21, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Websense Inc., a maker of software to monitor employees' Internet use, agreed to buy Palo Alto-based PortAuthority Technologies Inc. for about $90 million in cash to add business software that prevents leaks of confidential information. The acquisition is expected to cut profit by 10 cents to 15 cents a share in 2007 and add slightly to earnings in 2008, San Diego-based Websense said.
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BUSINESS
January 27, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Six top retailers are developing their own digital music service, hoping to attract masses of fans that have yet to embrace legitimate music offerings on the Internet. The six -- Best Buy Co., MTS Inc.'s Tower Records, Trans World Entertainment Corp., Wherehouse Entertainment Inc., Virgin Entertainment Group and Hastings Entertainment Inc. -- have acquired a controlling stake in Los Angeles-based Echo Networks Inc.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2001 | ANICK JESDANUN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Employers of more than a third of U.S. workers with access to the Internet are monitoring their e-mail messages and Web surfing regularly, says a study released Monday. Andrew Schulman, the study's chief researcher, attributed the prevalence of workplace surveillance to its ease and low cost--an average of $5.25 per monitored employee each year using commercial software packages.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2003 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. agreed Thursday to pay a $6-million fine for taking oversized trading commissions from investors who bought shares of initial public stock offerings through its San Francisco-based investment bankers. Securities regulators alleged that the country's second-largest banking company improperly shared in the profits of its IPO customers by accepting commissions of as much as 20 times the prevailing rate. The investors were primarily institutions such as hedge funds.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2006 | Chris Gaither and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writers
Add March Madness to the woes of corporate technology managers, those oft-maligned computer experts appreciated only when e-mail goes kaput or a PC devours a day's work. When the NCAA basketball championship gets into full swing Thursday, some fear Internet broadcasts of the tournament could overwhelm company networks and slow down work for everybody -- not just hoops-loving shirkers.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2000 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For television networks, prime time commences after dinner. For e-tailers, it starts after workers come into the office and fire up their computers. This holiday season in particular, many commerce Web sites are reporting traffic spikes between noon and 5 p.m., prompting analysts to dub this window the "New Prime Time."
BUSINESS
March 14, 2007 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Brooke Pfautz knows that sales at his mortgage banking firm will probably plunge during the NCAA basketball tournament that begins Thursday. But for the second year in a row, he plans to show the March Madness games on the office big-screen TVs and give a prize to the employee who picks the winning team. "I want to have a good, fun, upbeat atmosphere," he said from his office in Hunt Valley, Md. "You spend more of your waking hours at work, so you might as well enjoy it."
BUSINESS
February 13, 2005 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
In state and federal courtrooms last week, prosecutors told stories of fallen executives treating their companies like personal fiefdoms -- raiding the treasuries, decreeing phony financials and lying to conceal the rot from investors. The verdicts in the trials of the men who once ran WorldCom Inc., Tyco International Inc. and HealthSouth Corp. are probably weeks away. But corporate America is already serving the sentence for their alleged transgressions. There are paranoid auditors.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL and ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it the ultimate test of Internet freedom: the world's largest state security network deployed to police cyberspace in the most populous nation on Earth, where the number of online users is growing exponentially. The outcome will dictate how one-fifth of mankind relates to a technology that many are convinced owns the future.
SPORTS
March 15, 2006 | Greg Johnson, Times Staff Writer
March used to be maddening for Randy Edgar. When the NCAA men's basketball tournament rolled around, dozens of friends swamped his fax machine with bracket picks for what became known as the "Guru Pool." Duty called, so Edgar worked into the night, transferring picks to an Excel spreadsheet, drawing the brackets and faxing the results to about 40 competitors scattered around the country. The advent of e-mail reduced Edgar's workload, but "it was still horrible," the Oakland resident said.
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