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Wei Jingsheng

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1997
Re "U.S. Effort Led China to Release Dissident," Nov. 17: One down, 8 million to go. That's the meaning of the expulsion of Chinese freedom advocate Wei Jingsheng. The Chinese government's forced labor system of 1,100 factories still incarcerates 8 million-plus humans. None has been released, or is likely to be released in the near future. If anyone is inclined to mistake the release of Wei Jingsheng for a quantum leap for freedom in China, just consider that he's not in China, he's not free to pursue his cause in China and he's not likely to be allowed to return to China.
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OPINION
June 21, 1998 | Nancy Yoshihara, Nancy Yoshihara is an editorial writer for The Times
On Nov. 16, 1997, Wei Jingsheng was banished from China. Since his arrival in the United States the next day, China's best-known democracy leader and human-rights activist has worked tirelessly and traveled extensively to advance the cause of democracy in China. Most of his adult life--18 years--has been spent in prison. Wei, 48, was an electrician at the Beijing Zoo when he first raised the idea of democracy during the 1978-79 Democracy Wall Movement in Beijing.
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NEWS
April 2, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
China's leading dissident was detained by police Friday as he returned to Beijing from nearly a month traveling in the northeast, his secretary said. The detention of Wei Jingsheng may complicate efforts by the United States and China to prevent relations from deteriorating further over human rights differences. The Clinton Administration is threatening to revoke China's low-tariff trading privileges in June unless Beijing improves its human rights record. Former Secretary of State Cyrus R.
NEWS
May 10, 1998 | From Reuters
Two men forced into exile by Beijing met Saturday, drawing strength from each other and finding common ground. The Dalai Lama, spiritual leader of 6 million Tibetans, met Chinese dissident Wei Jingsheng and a group of China scholars for two hours before addressing a packed auditorium at Brandeis University near Boston. The Dalai Lama told the audience of more than 8,000 that he was grateful for the chance to visit with Wei and the others.
NEWS
November 17, 1997 | JUDY PASTERNAK and DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The trip that Wei Jingsheng once vowed he would never make ended Sunday at Detroit's Henry Ford Hospital, where China's most famous dissident was admitted after a journey that freed him from prison but removed him from his native land. Granted medical parole from a 14-year sentence, his second prison term, Wei is being treated for hypertension and evaluated for other health problems. A preliminary exam indicated he was in "fair but stable condition," said Thomas C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1997 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Injecting sobering doses of reality into the euphoric aftermath of Hong Kong's return to China, 600 people in Los Angeles spent one night this week remembering imprisoned Chinese democracy advocate Wei Jingsheng and his work. "The whole world should cry together--'Save Wei Jingsheng!' " said Alan Gleitsman, a human rights activist who has been in contact with Wei's family. "It's important that we speak out for Wei and all the political prisoners in China," said Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1995 | FANG LIZHI, Fang Lizhi, an astrophysicist now living in the United States, is China's most prominent dissident in exile. and
Release Wei Jingsheng! Release all political prisoners! Six and a half years ago, Jan. 6, 1989, I sent a letter to Deng Xiaoping, then chairman of China's Central Military Commission, to suggest that he release Democracy Wall leader Wei Jingsheng and other political prisoners. Later, many people joined this appeal. The government did not respond and finally used tanks and machine guns to kill students and people who peacefully demonstrated in Tian An Men Square to call for democratic reform.
NEWS
September 14, 1993 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move timed to enhance its candidacy to host the 2000 Olympic Games, the Chinese government today announced the release of Wei Jingsheng, China's most famous and longest-serving political prisoner. Wei, 43, was jailed in 1979 for his leadership in the "Democracy Wall" movement. The former electrician ignited the 1978-1981 movement for political reforms in China with a Dec. 5, 1978, wallposter calling for democracy as a "fifth modernization."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1995 | LIU BINYAN and PERRY LINK, Liu Binyan, a Chinese writer, worked for many years as a reporter for the People's Daily; Perry Link teaches Chinese literature at Princeton University
Wei Jingsheng, China's famous dissident, is a courageous man and a trenchant thinker. He has also had the bad luck of being a convenient pawn for the political purposes of the high barons of Chinese communism. In 1979, he was sentenced to 15 years in prison and served more than 14. After six months on parole, he was held for another 20 months in extralegal detention. This week, he was sentenced to a second term of 14 years in prison.
NEWS
December 12, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Celebrated Chinese dissident Wei Jingsheng--who has already spent much of his adult life in prison for criticizing the Communist leadership--will be tried Wednesday in Beijing for the capital crime of attempting to overthrow the government, court officials confirmed Monday. Beijing court spokesman Chen Xiong said the trial will be open, and he accepted verbal requests from journalists to attend.
NEWS
December 9, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring requests by China's leaders, President Clinton met Monday with Wei Jingsheng, just three weeks after the prominent Chinese dissident was released from prison and exiled from his homeland. But in an apparent effort to avoid damaging relations with Beijing, White House officials played down the 35-minute meeting, calling it a personal visit. They released an official photograph rather than allowing news photographers or reporters into the private session.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A prominent voice in China's pro-democracy movement will be a visiting scholar at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. The school announced Wednesday that Wei Jingsheng accepted the appointment. He will lecture and hold workshops while pursuing his own writing and human rights work. He also will be treated at the Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center for a variety of ailments that developed during his long imprisonment.
NEWS
November 25, 1997 | Reuters
The University of California at Berkeley has offered a six-month visiting fellowship to freed Chinese dissident Wei Jingsheng, a university official said Monday. Eric Stover, director of the university's Human Rights Center, said Wei had also been invited to lecture at the school within the next few months. Considered the father of China's modern democracy movement, Wei was freed this month after having served as a prisoner in China for all but a few months since 1979.
NEWS
November 23, 1997 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wei Jingsheng, China's most famous dissident, says the United States has been engaging in "wishful thinking" about China, whose Communist Party leadership, he claims, is trying to obtain Western technology for military purposes. "The United States seemed to be clearer about the threat from the Soviet Union. And it was also tougher with the Soviet Union," Wei said through an interpreter in an interview with The Times on Saturday, a week after being freed from a Chinese labor camp.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Eight years ago, Fang Lizhi was a cause celebre. He was the fiery champion of democracy blamed by the Chinese regime for the mammoth demonstrations that spread through the cities and universities of China in 1989. After the Tiananmen Square massacre, he fled to the safety of the American Embassy in Beijing. There, he became the focus of a year of frenetic negotiations between the George Bush administration and China before he was finally allowed to leave the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1997
Today China's leading political dissident, Wei Jingsheng, is a free man in the United States, far from the homeland where he championed democracy despite a long and brutal imprisonment. Wei had always said that he would not leave China, but the fact is his views on political reform can be communicated better from outside his country. Clearly the international community's continued focus on the plight of Wei, 47, helped to create the pressure to free him.
NEWS
April 6, 1994 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only six months after he was released from prison to sweeten China's unsuccessful bid for the 2000 Summer Olympic Games, leading dissident Wei Jingsheng is back in custody facing another term in prison for what authorities described Tuesday as "new crimes." The official New China News Agency reported that "the Beijing Public Security Bureau has decided to investigate suspected new criminal offenses by Wei Jingsheng."
NEWS
November 17, 1997 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China's weekend release of its top dissident, Wei Jingsheng, into exile in the United States was the culmination of an intensive although largely secret four-month campaign by the Clinton administration, according to senior administration officials. As part of this effort, President Clinton personally urged Chinese President Jiang Zemin to release Wei from prison. The request came during a nighttime conversation in the residence quarters of the White House on Oct.
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