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HEALTH
May 19, 2012 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Until recently, very few people had ever heard of raspberry ketones, the aromatic compounds that give the berries their distinctive smell. Today, health food stores have trouble keeping the capsules or drops of the stuff on their shelves. Almost overnight, an obscure plant compound became the next big thing in weight loss - and all it took was a few words from Dr. Oz. In a February episode of "The Dr. Oz Show," Mehmet Oz told viewers that raspberry ketones were "the No. 1 miracle in a bottle to burn your fat. " Once Oz calls something a "miracle," it doesn't remain obscure for long.
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HEALTH
April 5, 2014 | Lily Dayton
Each time health psychologist Kelly McGonigal teaches her Science of Willpower class, she asks students to select a willpower challenge to focus on during the 10-week course. Though students' goals are diverse -- kicking nicotine or getting out of debt, controlling their temper or overcoming alcohol abuse -- there is one goal that is most common among the 200 or 300 students who pack the lecture hall seeking life change: They want to lose weight. "It's important to understand that everyone is struggling with something," says McGonigal, whose experience in the Stanford University course inspired her to write "The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It. " Beliefs about the role of willpower in weight loss have changed through the decades.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1985 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
A Van Nuys company that sells pills that it claims make dieters "dream away" unwanted pounds while sleeping agreed Wednesday to halt sales in California and pay a $162,500 penalty to settle a false advertising suit filed by Ventura County. In a consent decree in which they admitted no wrongdoing, officials of the Nutri-Marketing Co. promised not to sell or advertise their product in California.
SCIENCE
March 28, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Scientists and physicians who study the treatment of obesity have been puzzled for some years over bariatric surgery and its benefits.”Stomach stapling” surgery was long seen as a “plumbing adjustment” that prompts weight loss by restricting the stomach's capacity. But mounting evidence demonstrates that it does much more than that. Bariatric surgery appears to set in motion a host of physiological and psychological changes beyond weight loss, in many cases resolving type 2 diabetes, righting problematic cholesterol readings, and not just curbing, but changing, appetites.
HEALTH
February 8, 2010
As people gain weight, their blood pressure tends to go up. Fortunately, as they lose weight, their blood pressure tends to go down -- but only so far, says Dr. Karol Watson, co-director of preventive cardiology and director of the hypertension clinic at UCLA. "If your body weight is normal, getting below doesn't help," she says. Even modest weight loss (say, 5% to 10% of your current heft) is effective at lowering blood pressure for those who have high blood pressure or prehypertension.
NEWS
October 9, 2010
The country is down to onededicated, prescription obesity medication -- the not-too-pleasantXenical -- since Friday's announcement that Meridiawill be removed from the market due to an increased risk ofheart problems among people with cardiovascular disease. But, notto fear, the major gathering of experts on obesity are gatheringSaturday through Tuesday in San Diego for the  Obesity 2010 meeting . Theschedule looks packed with promising ideas aimed at reducing thegirth of Americans although, I must say, I don't see any easyfixes.
HEALTH
January 12, 2013 | By James Fell
The band Shinedown has been around for more than a decade, selling more than 10 million albums worldwide. In 2012 they launched their fourth album, "Amaryllis," which made its debut at No. 4 on the Billboard 200. But the last year has been more than just about launching a new album for Brent Smith, the band's lead singer. After battling drug and alcohol addiction, becoming obese and being insulted on national television for his weight, a loving woman and the inspiration of his son and fans straightened him out, he said.
HEALTH
September 28, 2009 | Judy Foreman
As a nation, we are obviously getting fatter and fatter. Not only are we ever more confused about how to lose weight, we're particularly fuzzy on the question of how big a role exercise plays and whether we just have to count calories. So, here's the deal. Yes, you can count calories or weigh yourself every day. If your weight is up today compared with yesterday, you ate more calories than you burned. If it's less, you burned more than you ate -- provided you didn't drink gallons of liquid the day before, which could throw the scale off. It comes down to simple arithmetic, and you've heard it before: Calories in, calories out. You will absolutely, inevitably, sadly, this-could-not-be-clearer gain weight if you eat more calories than you expend in basic metabolism -- breathing, digesting, sleeping, etc. -- plus whatever else you do, such as chasing the kids, walking, vacuuming or going to the gym. But most of us can't, or won't, do the math, probably because it's so depressing.
NEWS
August 12, 2010
An account of the failed investigational weight-loss drug rimonabant, published Thursday, suggests that it may be even harder in the future to bring new prescription diet drugs to the market. The drug, rimonabant, was in a large, multinational late-stage clinical trial when the study was abruptly halted in 2008 because of reports of psychiatric side effects, including some suicides and suicide attempts in people taking rimonabant as either part of the clinical trial or by prescription in countries where the drug had already been approved for marketing.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Contestants on the reality TV program "The Biggest Loser"not only lost weight fast, they "rapidly and substantially" lowered their blood pressure and improved their metabolic function, the physician who is the show's medical consultant reported Friday to the American Assn. of Clinical Endocrinologists. Dr. Robert Huizenga, the medical director of the NBC program and several other shows, including Univision's " Dale Con Ganas ," says the combination of moderate calorie restriction and roughly four hours of daily exercise yields bigger health gains, more cheaply and with fewer complications, than bariatric surgery.
HEALTH
March 21, 2014 | By James S. Fell
In regard to weight, Jennifer Hudson's biggest concern these days might be finding a shelf sturdy enough to bear the weight of her numerous awards. Her Oscar and Grammy wins represent but a small portion of the recognition she has received. But body weight has been a concern for her in the past. And it was Weight Watchers, for which she appears in ads, and developing a sense of play about physical activity that helped her lose 80 pounds and keep it off. Were you heavy as a child, or did the weight come on later?
SPORTS
February 8, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
PHOENIX -- There's a long-running joke among writers about how many players claim to be in the best shape of their lives when reporting to spring training. In the case of catcher A.J. Ellis, it might really be true. Ellis reported to the Dodgers camp Saturday noticeably leaner than he was a year ago. Ellis said he dropped 15 pounds over the winter. “Trying to take stress off my lower body,” Ellis said. “I want to catch 120, 125 games this year. I want to be physically ready to do that.” Ellis started 109 games last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Rene Lynch
Rachel Frederickson, 24, of Los Angeles won the Season 15 title of "The Biggest Loser" and the $250,000 grand prize, but promptly sparked criticism from viewers who say the show went too far by allowing the former competitive swimmer to diet her way down to 105 pounds. Frederickson started the competition at 260 pounds and lost 155 pounds, or 59.62% of her body weight. When the voice-over artist first walked on stage at the finale of NBC's reality weight-loss TV show, she did so to oohs and ahhs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Rene Lynch
Rachel and David in "The Biggest Loser" finale? Saw that one coming. But Bobby?!?! Second chances, indeed. Rachel was all but guaranteed to win the first-ever triathlon staged by the weight-loss reality show, given her strong swimming background. And David is just flat out a stronger and faster competitor than the rest of the field -- and still has a good bit of weight to lose. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times Bobby, however, had been eliminated once from the show, and managed to fight his way back in. At times, he'd been called out for not working very hard in the gym. And he came in dead last in the five-person triathlon.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Practicing yoga for at least three hours a week for three months reduced the fatigue and inflammation in breast cancer survivors, compared with survivors who did no yoga, researchers reported. And the more yoga, the greater the change, the researchers, from the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, said. At six months - three months after the formal yoga had ended - fatigue was 57% lower in the women who had done yoga, compared with those who had not. Inflammation, measured  by blood tests, was reduced by up to 20%, the researchers said.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday cracked down on Sensa Products, an El Segundo company that sells a weight-loss powder that users sprinkle on food to help curb their appetite. The powder, which is marketed as activating the part of the brain that helps control appetite, is said to make users feel fuller faster so they eat less. Federal regulators, however, weren't buying the pitch. Sensa Products now has to return $26.5 million to consumers who bought its product because the company used faulty science in its marketing to mislead consumers, the FTC said.
HEALTH
September 28, 2009 | Judy Foreman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
As a nation, we are obviously getting fatter and fatter. Not only are we ever more confused about how to lose weight, we're particularly fuzzy on the question of how big a role exercise plays and whether we just have to count calories. So, here's the deal. Yes, you can count calories or weigh yourself every day. If your weight is up today compared with yesterday, you ate more calories than you burned. If it's less, you burned more than you ate -- provided you didn't drink gallons of liquid the day before, which could throw the scale off. It comes down to simple arithmetic, and you've heard it before: Calories in, calories out. You will absolutely, inevitably, sadly, this-could-not-be-clearer gain weight if you eat more calories than you expend in basic metabolism -- breathing, digesting, sleeping, etc. -- plus whatever else you do, such as chasing the kids, walking, vacuuming or going to the gym. But most of us can't, or won't, do the math, probably because it's so depressing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1999
Many people are looking to lose weight before the "bathing suit" season of summer. But health officials urge caution when trying to trim those pounds--especially if you try fad diets or assorted medications. The wrong diet or drugs can cause major health problems. Here are some tips. Advice for those considering losing weight: * Check with your doctor. Make sure your health status allows for taking in fewer calories and increasing physical activity.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Federal regulators Tuesday ordered a California-based fad weight-loss company to return $26.5 million to consumers who bought its product - a sprinkle-on powder for food that promised users would lose weight without exercising. Sensa Products, based in Manhattan Beach, sold a sprinkle-on food additive to was supposed to enhance taste and smell and make users feel fuller faster, the Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday.  Regulators, however, said the company used faulty science in its marketing to mislead consumers.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Stuart Pfeifer
WASHINGTON -- Federal regulators said Friday that they planned to crack down on misleading advertisements for weight-loss products, including dietary supplements, food additives and skin creams. Jessica Rich, director of the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Consumer Protection, will hold a news conference Tuesday to announce an "initiative against deceptive claims made by national marketers of fad weight-loss products," the agency said. No additional information was provided.
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