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NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Obese men who want to improve their sexual health might have another solution besides their erectile dysfunction drugs. A study finds that overweight men who lost just 5% of their weight over eight weeks saw improvements in erectile dysfunction, sexual desire and urinary tract symptoms. The small study focused on 31 obese men with a body mass index of 30 or greater and who had Type 2 diabetes. Some were put on a low-calorie diet that included liquid meal replacements and others were assigned to a high-protein, low-fat diet that decreased their calorie intake by 600 calories a day. For 42 weeks afterward the participants stayed on the high-protein diet, or were switched to it. Those on the low-calorie diet lost 10% of their body weight and 10% off their waist circumference, and those on the high-protein diet lost 5% of their weight and waist circumference.
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NEWS
July 22, 2010 | By Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times
Here are two recalls that might not have consumers rushing to get their money back. One is for a weight-loss supplement, the other for a sex enhancer. The Food and Drug Administration announced today that a lab analysis of Joyful Slim Herb Supplement was found to contain desmethyl sibutramine. Most people know sibutramine as Meridia, a prescription weight-loss drug. This month, the agency similarly announced that some batches of Good Health's Vialipro had been found to contain sulfoaildenafil, a cousin of sildenafil.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
In its potential to fight Type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery is looking good -- very good. Bariatric surgeons themselves noticed the operation's potential some time ago, as these earlier stories noted: Gastric bypass: Is it a diabetes fix? Weight-loss surgery may soon be widely used Then other studies began to confirm the operation's ability to help patients quickly get control of their disease. Now we have a study, published Monday in Archives of Surgery, analyzing diabetes-drug use and healthcare costs in the wake of bariatric surgery.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Tami Dennis / Tribune Health
Let's hope that resolution to shed excess pounds doesn't rely too heavily on saccharin-sweetened food. If it does, you might want to rethink your approach to dieting -- but not necessarily because saccharin is going to do you harm. The belief that saccharin is risky has persisted for decades now. That is, it's persisted outside the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, both of which have offered up figurative "to your health" toasts with the stuff.
NEWS
December 23, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Losing weight isn't all about you. It's great if you've achieved some healthy goals, but how about praising others for shaping up? Sounds easy, but it's easy to overlook. This Fitness Center blog post from the Orlando Sentinel explains: "Although I think I'm tuned into my environment, I don't always notice those around me. I've been so focused on my workout routine and my continued growth, that I've forgotten that it feels as good to give a compliment as it does to receive one. " That's true -- if you know what you're doing.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The weight loss that follows a successful bariatric surgery makes most patients feel younger. But a new study suggests that following bariatric surgery, some patients show signs of being biologically younger, as well. At Stanford University, researchers looked for evidence of change in bariatric surgery patients by measuring their telomeres -- regions of repeating DNA sequences at the end of a chromosome that grow a little shorter with age and chronic illness. Telomeres are considered a biomarker of the aging process.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
"Django Unchained" star Leonardo DiCaprio appears in a Jim Beam bourbon ad for the Japanese market. Wearing a crisp white shirt and wielding an ice pick, he carves a perfectly round ice cube the size of a grapefruit, then snaps and it magically turns into crushed ice. He says four words in the 17-second spot: "Cool bourbon. Jim Beam. " [via Daily Mail ] "I love that the size of my ass is trending worldwide!" posts Boy George to Twitter . The 51-year-old British singer has been shedding pounds, and his dramatic weight loss has captured media attention, at least partly because he regularly tweets about his diet.
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
For kids trying to lose weight and get in shape, parent involvement may be essential. A study released today in the journal Pediatrics found that a parent-driven diet program was best at helping kids shed pounds and gain other health benefits. The study involved 165 overweight children ranging in age from about 6 to 10 years old. Each was randomly assigned to one of three interventions: a diet program taught to parents by dietitians that focused on goal setting, problem solving and positive reinforcement from parents; an activity program for kids taught by physical education teachers, with parents taking part early on and encouraged to do more at home with their kids; and a combination of the two programs, with parents and children both participating.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
People who cut down on added sugars in their diets lost an average of about 1.7 pounds - a result researchers called small but significant. The result was in a paper published online Tuesday in the British Medical Journal that analyzed 71 studies of sugar intake and weight. The World Health Organization recommended in 2003 that sugar intake be limited to 10% of calories; the agency commissioned this study as part of its intention to update its recommendation. The studies also showed that increasing consumption of added sugars led to gaining about 1 1/2 pounds, the researchers from the University of Otago and Riddet Institute in New Zealand wrote.
SCIENCE
June 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The Food and Drug Administration has approved marketing of the weight-loss drug lorcaserin, the first prescription anti-obesity medication to win the FDA's blessing since the agency approved orlistat in 1999. Once it is cleared by the Drug Enforcement Administration, the drug will be marketed in the United States under the commercial name Belviq. The medication won marketing approval as a drug for "chronic weight management in adult patients" with a body mass index greater than 30, or for those with a BMI of 27 or above with a weight-related condition such as high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol or Type 2 diabetes.
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