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NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Some people chew sugar-free gum as a weight loss strategy, but does it work? An recent online study in the journal Obesity finds that chewing gum daily may have no effect on losing weight. The eight-week study included 201 overweight or obese adults, about half of whom were randomly put in an intervention group and told to chew gum daily for at least 90 minutes at specific times throughout the day. The others were part of a control group that did not chew gum. Both groups were given nutritional information and told to continue their regular activity programs.
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NEWS
April 28, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Weight-loss surgery could be a quick diabetes fix for some people, some studies have suggested, and now researchers are getting closer to an explanation as to why that might be the case. And it's about much more than weight loss.   Researchers from Columbia University and Duke University studied two groups of obese diabetic patients at a hospital in New York. Ten people had a type of gastric bypass surgery  that essentially reduces the size of the stomach, and 11 people were put on a strict diet.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
The proposed weight-loss drug Lorcaserin, rebuffed in its bid for Food and Drug Administration approval last October, on Thursday won a recommendation of approval from the agency's advisory committee, a major step toward winning the FDA's go-ahead to enter the U.S. market. If the agency follows the advice of the panel of independent experts--which is common but not routine-- Lorcaserin would become the first new prescription weight-loss drug to go on the U.S. market since Orlistat (now marketed over-the-counter as Alli)
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
For kids trying to lose weight and get in shape, parent involvement may be essential. A study released today in the journal Pediatrics found that a parent-driven diet program was best at helping kids shed pounds and gain other health benefits. The study involved 165 overweight children ranging in age from about 6 to 10 years old. Each was randomly assigned to one of three interventions: a diet program taught to parents by dietitians that focused on goal setting, problem solving and positive reinforcement from parents; an activity program for kids taught by physical education teachers, with parents taking part early on and encouraged to do more at home with their kids; and a combination of the two programs, with parents and children both participating.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The weight loss that follows a successful bariatric surgery makes most patients feel younger. But a new study suggests that following bariatric surgery, some patients show signs of being biologically younger, as well. At Stanford University, researchers looked for evidence of change in bariatric surgery patients by measuring their telomeres -- regions of repeating DNA sequences at the end of a chromosome that grow a little shorter with age and chronic illness. Telomeres are considered a biomarker of the aging process.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Obese men who want to improve their sexual health might have another solution besides their erectile dysfunction drugs. A study finds that overweight men who lost just 5% of their weight over eight weeks saw improvements in erectile dysfunction, sexual desire and urinary tract symptoms. The small study focused on 31 obese men with a body mass index of 30 or greater and who had Type 2 diabetes. Some were put on a low-calorie diet that included liquid meal replacements and others were assigned to a high-protein, low-fat diet that decreased their calorie intake by 600 calories a day. For 42 weeks afterward the participants stayed on the high-protein diet, or were switched to it. Those on the low-calorie diet lost 10% of their body weight and 10% off their waist circumference, and those on the high-protein diet lost 5% of their weight and waist circumference.
NEWS
December 27, 2010 | By Tami Dennis / Tribune Health
Let's hope that resolution to shed excess pounds doesn't rely too heavily on saccharin-sweetened food. If it does, you might want to rethink your approach to dieting -- but not necessarily because saccharin is going to do you harm. The belief that saccharin is risky has persisted for decades now. That is, it's persisted outside the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, both of which have offered up figurative "to your health" toasts with the stuff.
NEWS
August 16, 2010
In its potential to fight Type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery is looking good -- very good. Bariatric surgeons themselves noticed the operation's potential some time ago, as these earlier stories noted: Gastric bypass: Is it a diabetes fix? Weight-loss surgery may soon be widely used Then other studies began to confirm the operation's ability to help patients quickly get control of their disease. Now we have a study, published Monday in Archives of Surgery, analyzing diabetes-drug use and healthcare costs in the wake of bariatric surgery.
SCIENCE
June 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
The Food and Drug Administration has approved marketing of the weight-loss drug lorcaserin, the first prescription anti-obesity medication to win the FDA's blessing since the agency approved orlistat in 1999. Once it is cleared by the Drug Enforcement Administration, the drug will be marketed in the United States under the commercial name Belviq. The medication won marketing approval as a drug for "chronic weight management in adult patients" with a body mass index greater than 30, or for those with a BMI of 27 or above with a weight-related condition such as high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol or Type 2 diabetes.
HEALTH
January 31, 2011 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ten pounds can seem like a hundred when you're trying to lose weight. So just think how Oklahoma City residents must feel. They're looking to lose a million. Across the country, mayors have been urging their citizens to downsize themselves. The goal in Philadelphia: Drop 76 tons of rotundity in 76 days. (Didn't happen.) In Louisville, Ky.: Pare off 100,000 pounds of pudge over a summer. (Didn't happen.) In Corpus Christi, Texas: Dispose of 50,000 pounds of avoirdupois in a year.
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