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Weight Reduction Programs

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HEALTH
April 12, 2004 | Timothy Gower, Special to The Times
When your pants begin to feel a little snug around the waistline, do you vow to start working out for an hour every day? Ask the kid at McDonald's to hold the bun when you order a Quarter Pounder? Switch to low-carb beer? If so, welcome to the club: You're a typical guy. Women will try just about any approach to shedding pounds, weight-loss experts say, but men who set out to get slim tend to follow predictable patterns.
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HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein
A car accident in her freshman year of college forced Janelle Webb to put the brakes on an active lifestyle. A serious leg injury put her on crutches for five months, and her weight ballooned, eventually topping off at 254 pounds. Three years later she had a weight loss epiphany, eventually slimming down to 132.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1990 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State health investigators staked out a warehouse early Friday, then placed an embargo on more than 8 million capsules and tablets of a weight-loss product called Cal-Ban 3000 that is suspected of causing intestinal obstructions. Officials from D&F Industries, a health-products manufacturer with offices in Anaheim and Orange, could not be reached for comment Friday.
HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein
Mary ANN Wertenberger started her first diet at the age of 13; she describes herself as "never the fattest kid around," but she carried an extra 20 pounds as a young teenager. Throughout her life, more diets ensued (including a stint on the appetite suppressant drug phentermine), but exercise was rarely in the picture. Now, exercise is an integral part of how this 50-year-old veterinarian from Chatsworth maintains her weight of 172, down from a high of 275.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans who lose weight through commercial programs gain it all back within five years, a blue-ribbon advisory panel to the National Institutes of Health announced Wednesday, saying that 20 years of nationwide struggle against obesity have failed. "Most people who need to lose weight are not succeeding," said Dr. Suzanne W. Fletcher, chairwoman of the panel. As many as one in three adult Americans is overweight, a percentage that has not changed in more than 20 years, the panel said.
HEALTH
December 29, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Today's lard-melting body belts, creams, subliminal tapes, pills and teas are just the latest in more than a century's worth of wishful thinking, bad advice and chicanery. Yesterday's would-be pound shedders were barraged with ads for a host of products with names such as "Densmore's Corpulency Cure," "Dr. Gordon's Elegant Pills," "Kellogg's Safe Fat Reducer," "Allan's Anti-Fat" and "The Slenmar Reducing Brush."
HEALTH
January 12, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
The LoCarb Life shop in West Los Angeles can seem a paradise for people on low-carbohydrate diets. They come inside seeking to escape the monotony of endless meals built around meats and cheeses, and find hundreds of unexpected options -- low-carb macaroni mixes, frozen bagels, puddings. The store, says owner Catherine Lincoln, is a haven for dieters who have "overdosed on the beef."
NEWS
October 1, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Trade Commission Thursday charged five of the nation's largest commercial diet programs with deceptive advertising, saying that the plans have made unsubstantiated weight-loss claims and used consumer testimonials without evidence that they represented typical experiences of dieters in their programs.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The doorbell rings at the ersatz American Colonial in the Hollywood Hills, the door opens, and there's a very tanned Richard Simmons in red tank top and red-striped exercise shorts. "Hellllllloooooooooooo," he coos, smiling and striking that Richard Simmons pose the stand-up comics love to spoof. "Hello, Mr. Simmons." "I'm Richard, " he says, patting my shoulder. I brace for what's next.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2002 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 6:30 a.m Saturday dozens of people with--shall we say politely--pounds to spare began arriving for what would soon turn into the busiest morning of the year at resolution central, a local Weight Watchers meeting. "Almost every single person in my office said their New Year's resolution was to lose weight," said Heather Winnin, 29. "I figured I better get here early to get a chair."
HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Weight loss requires an overhaul of diet, exercise, essentially your entire life. But putting off these changes is a national pastime. Eating right and exercising is better done next week because today -- just isn't the right time. To lose weight, say experts in nutrition and weight loss, you have to be ready to make changes, even small ones.
HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Most dieters gain back the weight -- and then some -- after losing it. So what's the secret of the few who have kept it off? For starters, they didn't diet. Instead, they changed how they ate -- long-term, wholesale changes, not just cutting back for a limited time and then returning to their old ways of snacking on Doritos and Haagen-Dazs. And they exercised -- consistently and in copious amounts, incorporating it into their daily routine.
HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein
A basketball injury sidelined 39-year-old pastor Kerwin Manning in fall 2004. At 210 pounds, he had a less than ideal diet heavy on fatty and fast foods. Instead of packing on more pounds, he decided to take some off, via a 40-day, water-only fast. Although a fast is radical and potentially risky (it should be undertaken only while in a physician's care), the extreme measure was just the impetus Manning needed.
HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein
Bonnie SHERIFF, 26, left Kansas for California to attend Caltech in 2003. In the process, she chucked her typical Midwestern meat-and-potatoes diet and decided to slim down, going from about 180 pounds in high school to 127 now. The doctoral candidate, who lives in Pasadena, exercises about three to four times a week and sticks to a diet heavy on whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Once an asthma sufferer, she says she now has "virtually no symptoms" and has increased energy and stamina.
HEALTH
March 17, 2008 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
The Internet may be your Best Friend Forever, but when it comes to keeping weight off, you're better off communing with a real person, according to a multi-center study conducted by investigators at Duke University Medical Center and three other research institutions. In a 30-month investigation, the researchers compared the effectiveness of personal contact with a trained weight-loss counselor to Internet support in helping volunteers stave off weight gain after an initial weight loss.
HEALTH
July 9, 2007 | Chelsea Martinez, Times Staff Writer
Eat what you want -- just don't eat too much of it. That may be fine advice, but it's easier said than done. Now a Canadian scientist has conducted a simple study to see if a special set of dishes can help dieters toe the line. In the first clinical trial on "portion control plates," Sue Pedersen, an endocrinologist at the University of Calgary, had 65 subjects use a specially designed plate and bowl to limit their calorie intake for part of each day.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1999 | SHARON BERNSTEIN and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The maker of key ingredients in the diet-drug cocktail known as fen-phen has agreed to pay up to $4.83 billion to settle thousands of claims from patients who may have suffered heart damage from taking the once-popular weight-loss treatment.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael quickly realized that A Place for Us wasn't the place for him. Overweight and suffering from stress, the New Yorker had flown cross-country to attend what was advertised as a weight-loss clinic in sunny Southern California. The air fare was free and the treatment, he was told, fully covered by his Blue Cross plan.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Starting this summer, the makers of vitamins and dietary supplements will have to do something they've never done before: verify that what they sell is real. On Friday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that starting in late August, manufacturers in the $22-billon-a-year industry must conduct tests to show that their products contain all the ingredients on the label -- nothing more and nothing less. Companies must also keep records of consumer complaints.
HEALTH
March 19, 2007 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
I've been hearing about a treatment called LipoZap. Does it work? I have a problem with fat around my midsection. JOHN M. Tujunga The product: Imagine the uproar if someone discovered a treatment that quickly removed large amounts of fat without effort, sacrifice or surgery of any sort. You'd expect dancing in the streets. Fireworks. And a few billion dollars in sales.
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