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Weight Reduction Programs

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HEALTH
April 12, 2004 | Timothy Gower, Special to The Times
When your pants begin to feel a little snug around the waistline, do you vow to start working out for an hour every day? Ask the kid at McDonald's to hold the bun when you order a Quarter Pounder? Switch to low-carb beer? If so, welcome to the club: You're a typical guy. Women will try just about any approach to shedding pounds, weight-loss experts say, but men who set out to get slim tend to follow predictable patterns.
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HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein
A car accident in her freshman year of college forced Janelle Webb to put the brakes on an active lifestyle. A serious leg injury put her on crutches for five months, and her weight ballooned, eventually topping off at 254 pounds. Three years later she had a weight loss epiphany, eventually slimming down to 132.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1990 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State health investigators staked out a warehouse early Friday, then placed an embargo on more than 8 million capsules and tablets of a weight-loss product called Cal-Ban 3000 that is suspected of causing intestinal obstructions. Officials from D&F Industries, a health-products manufacturer with offices in Anaheim and Orange, could not be reached for comment Friday.
HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein
Mary ANN Wertenberger started her first diet at the age of 13; she describes herself as "never the fattest kid around," but she carried an extra 20 pounds as a young teenager. Throughout her life, more diets ensued (including a stint on the appetite suppressant drug phentermine), but exercise was rarely in the picture. Now, exercise is an integral part of how this 50-year-old veterinarian from Chatsworth maintains her weight of 172, down from a high of 275.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Americans who lose weight through commercial programs gain it all back within five years, a blue-ribbon advisory panel to the National Institutes of Health announced Wednesday, saying that 20 years of nationwide struggle against obesity have failed. "Most people who need to lose weight are not succeeding," said Dr. Suzanne W. Fletcher, chairwoman of the panel. As many as one in three adult Americans is overweight, a percentage that has not changed in more than 20 years, the panel said.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The doorbell rings at the ersatz American Colonial in the Hollywood Hills, the door opens, and there's a very tanned Richard Simmons in red tank top and red-striped exercise shorts. "Hellllllloooooooooooo," he coos, smiling and striking that Richard Simmons pose the stand-up comics love to spoof. "Hello, Mr. Simmons." "I'm Richard, " he says, patting my shoulder. I brace for what's next.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2002 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 6:30 a.m Saturday dozens of people with--shall we say politely--pounds to spare began arriving for what would soon turn into the busiest morning of the year at resolution central, a local Weight Watchers meeting. "Almost every single person in my office said their New Year's resolution was to lose weight," said Heather Winnin, 29. "I figured I better get here early to get a chair."
BUSINESS
October 8, 1999 | SHARON BERNSTEIN and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The maker of key ingredients in the diet-drug cocktail known as fen-phen has agreed to pay up to $4.83 billion to settle thousands of claims from patients who may have suffered heart damage from taking the once-popular weight-loss treatment.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael quickly realized that A Place for Us wasn't the place for him. Overweight and suffering from stress, the New Yorker had flown cross-country to attend what was advertised as a weight-loss clinic in sunny Southern California. The air fare was free and the treatment, he was told, fully covered by his Blue Cross plan.
SPORTS
July 17, 1991 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sibby Flowers could lift the weight, she simply could not make it. An hour before her designated weigh-in period ended at the 1989 Olympic Festival weightlifting competition, Flowers was half a pound too heavy. This, after spending five hours in a sauna squeezing every ounce of water from her muscled body. The sauna was across town, she recalled this week, and she had to scurry back to try to shed eight more ounces so she could compete in the 97-pound category.
HEALTH
June 9, 2008 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Weight loss requires an overhaul of diet, exercise, essentially your entire life. But putting off these changes is a national pastime. Eating right and exercising is better done next week because today -- just isn't the right time. To lose weight, say experts in nutrition and weight loss, you have to be ready to make changes, even small ones.
HEALTH
March 17, 2008 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
The Internet may be your Best Friend Forever, but when it comes to keeping weight off, you're better off communing with a real person, according to a multi-center study conducted by investigators at Duke University Medical Center and three other research institutions. In a 30-month investigation, the researchers compared the effectiveness of personal contact with a trained weight-loss counselor to Internet support in helping volunteers stave off weight gain after an initial weight loss.
HEALTH
July 9, 2007 | Chelsea Martinez, Times Staff Writer
Eat what you want -- just don't eat too much of it. That may be fine advice, but it's easier said than done. Now a Canadian scientist has conducted a simple study to see if a special set of dishes can help dieters toe the line. In the first clinical trial on "portion control plates," Sue Pedersen, an endocrinologist at the University of Calgary, had 65 subjects use a specially designed plate and bowl to limit their calorie intake for part of each day.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Starting this summer, the makers of vitamins and dietary supplements will have to do something they've never done before: verify that what they sell is real. On Friday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that starting in late August, manufacturers in the $22-billon-a-year industry must conduct tests to show that their products contain all the ingredients on the label -- nothing more and nothing less. Companies must also keep records of consumer complaints.
HEALTH
June 20, 2005 | From Newsday
Obese teenagers who took the weight loss drug orlistat while making lifestyle changes gained less weight over 54 weeks, on average, than a control group of teens who changed behaviors but took a dummy pill, a study has found. Overall, teens taking orlistat experienced a reduction in body mass index, a critical measure of whether one's weight falls within a healthy range for one's height, while those in the placebo group saw their BMIs rise.
HEALTH
June 13, 2005 | Emily Singer, Special to The Times
Even as a new wave of dairy commercials touts eating yogurt and other dairy products as a way to shed unwanted pounds, new research shows that drinking excess milk can cause weight gain in older children. "We're concerned that adolescents will see the ads and conclude that drinking large amounts of milk will be an easy way to lose weight," says lead researcher Catherine Berkey, a biostatistician at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2002 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's belt-tightening time in the Capitol--in more ways than one. As legislators struggle to cut fat from a bloated state budget, many are waging their own private battles of the bulge. Diet season is in full swing in Sacramento, producing a crop of leaner, meaner political fighting machines better able to withstand the stress of lawmaking--and, not incidentally, more likely to look good on the campaign trail.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Starting this summer, the makers of vitamins and dietary supplements will have to do something they've never done before: verify that what they sell is real. On Friday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that starting in late August, manufacturers in the $22-billon-a-year industry must conduct tests to show that their products contain all the ingredients on the label -- nothing more and nothing less. Companies must also keep records of consumer complaints.
HEALTH
May 2, 2005 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
Deciding how often to eat can be almost as vexing as choosing what to eat. Are three daily, regularly spaced meals the best recipe for fat burning? Or five to six mini-meals? The recent publication of "The 3-Hour Diet" by fitness guru and best-selling author Jorge Cruise is likely to fuel the debate. In the book, Cruise contends that the timing of meals is as important as what's eaten.
HEALTH
April 11, 2005 | Emily Singer, Special to The Times
Dieters often try to trick themselves into thinking they've eaten more by putting their food in smaller bowls. New research shows this tactic may work. "People often believe our stomachs tell us when we're full," says Brian Wansink, a nutrition and marketing expert at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "But we can be tremendously influenced by the cues around us." In the study, 54 adults sat down to a free lunch, which they thought was to test a new flavor of soup.
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