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Weight Reduction Programs

HEALTH
June 7, 2004 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
It's there, looming six weeks in the future: a summer vacation where bathing suits and shorts are mandatory attire. But the thought of squeezing into either sends you into a cold panic. Those 20 extra pounds that have been hanging on for dear life need to go. Can you lose them in a few short weeks without resorting to unsafe crash diets or questionable supplements? Yes, if you have a will of steel to stick to a strict workout program and a sensible diet for several weeks.
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BUSINESS
November 1, 1991 | S. J. DIAMOND
Billed as the beginning of a crackdown on diet programs, the Federal Trade Commission's recent charges against Optifast, Ultrafast and Medifast liquid diet programs are actually just the most recent of such government actions. Before the liquids, there were Fibre Trim, Fat-Magnet diet pills, the Ultimate Solution Diet Program, Dream Away diet pills, Le Patch, La Creme, even magic glasses to make food look unappealing.
NEWS
August 5, 1998 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In tall, stainless-steel vats that look like they belong in a microbrewery, Amgen Inc. of Thousand Oaks is brewing up batches of what could be a new anti-obesity drug--a naturally occurring human protein now being tested in patients. At a plant in Nutley, N.J., Hoffmann-La Roche hopes to begin mass-producing a new diet pill called Xenical, the first chemical of a class that blocks the uptake of fats from the gut--cutting calories even without a change in diet.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | From Reuters
Federal health officials Friday withdrew controversial proposals to limit consumption of the herb ephedra, often promoted as a weight-loss aid, as they conduct a new review of its safety. The Food and Drug Administration, which has been criticized by the dietary supplement industry for creating unfounded alarm about the substance, said it had received 273 reports of adverse reactions in people consuming products containing ephedra.
HEALTH
July 5, 2004 | From Reuters
Girls who are starting to get too pudgy at age 5 are often experienced dieters by age 9 -- but they put on extra pounds instead of taking them off, researchers say. Jennifer Shunk and Leann Birch of Pennsylvania State University studied 153 girls in central Pennsylvania. At age 5, 32 of them were considered at risk of being overweight by federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention standards. They were checked again at ages 7 and 9.
HEALTH
November 24, 1997 | ROB GOUBEAUX
As a child I was always heavy. There might be two pairs of "husky" pants in my size in an entire clothing store--invariably, one of them would be plaid. Most of my childhood pictures feature me as a butterball in loud slacks. The saving grace proved to be that I was the tallest kid in the class and could "carry" the weight (and no one would dare make fun of my pants). Unfortunately, I eventually quit growing taller while continuing to grow wider.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Raising concerns about the wildly popular weight-loss drug combination known as fen-phen, doctors at the Mayo Clinic have identified 24 women who developed damaged heart valves after taking the drugs, including five women who underwent heart surgery to repair or replace a defective valve.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | SALLY SQUIRES, THE WASHINGTON POST
For those striving to shed pounds, the news this spring seemed grim. A panel of experts convened by the National Institutes of Health in March found little evidence to show that diets are effective for the long term. That doesn't mean that health experts are saying gain as much weight as you like or don't try to lose some of that paunch.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The door opens at the ersatz American Colonial in the Hollywood Hills, and there stands a very tanned Richard Simmons in red tank top and red-striped exercise shorts. "Hellllllloooooooooooo," he coos, smiling and striking that Richard Simmons pose the stand-up comics love to spoof. "Hello, Mr. Simmons." "I'm Richard, " he says, patting my shoulder. I brace for what's next.
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