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Weight Reduction Programs

HEALTH
July 5, 2004 | From Reuters
Girls who are starting to get too pudgy at age 5 are often experienced dieters by age 9 -- but they put on extra pounds instead of taking them off, researchers say. Jennifer Shunk and Leann Birch of Pennsylvania State University studied 153 girls in central Pennsylvania. At age 5, 32 of them were considered at risk of being overweight by federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention standards. They were checked again at ages 7 and 9.
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HEALTH
November 24, 1997 | ROB GOUBEAUX
As a child I was always heavy. There might be two pairs of "husky" pants in my size in an entire clothing store--invariably, one of them would be plaid. Most of my childhood pictures feature me as a butterball in loud slacks. The saving grace proved to be that I was the tallest kid in the class and could "carry" the weight (and no one would dare make fun of my pants). Unfortunately, I eventually quit growing taller while continuing to grow wider.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Raising concerns about the wildly popular weight-loss drug combination known as fen-phen, doctors at the Mayo Clinic have identified 24 women who developed damaged heart valves after taking the drugs, including five women who underwent heart surgery to repair or replace a defective valve.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | SALLY SQUIRES, THE WASHINGTON POST
For those striving to shed pounds, the news this spring seemed grim. A panel of experts convened by the National Institutes of Health in March found little evidence to show that diets are effective for the long term. That doesn't mean that health experts are saying gain as much weight as you like or don't try to lose some of that paunch.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The door opens at the ersatz American Colonial in the Hollywood Hills, and there stands a very tanned Richard Simmons in red tank top and red-striped exercise shorts. "Hellllllloooooooooooo," he coos, smiling and striking that Richard Simmons pose the stand-up comics love to spoof. "Hello, Mr. Simmons." "I'm Richard, " he says, patting my shoulder. I brace for what's next.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1994 | ALICIA DOYLE
Mirror, mirror on the wall . . . who's the skinniest one of all? You are, if you are looking into a mirror that would reflect only a skinny you, no matter how much extra weight you carry. This image--a "skinny" version of you--is the focus of a weight loss program at a Mission Hills clinic. While many diet plans are known for their limited menus and exercise regimens, the Lindora Medical Clinic's approach puts the emphasis on the psychological side of dieting.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1996 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defending their business against the newest twist in dieting, commercial weight-loss companies are expanding their menus to include prescription drugs. Jenny Craig, Nutri/System Inc. and Diet Centers, three of the largest weight-loss firms, said Wednesday that they are launching test programs in which clients use the recently approved drug Redux along with the usual diet of prepackaged foods.
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | From United Press International
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday moved to ban more than 100 ingredients in over-the-counter diet pills, saying there is no proof that they work and that one may even cause choking. However, the proposed ban on weight-control ingredients did not include two widely used appetite suppressants that have been sharply criticized by consumer groups--phenylpropanolamine, or PPA, and benzocaine.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over-the-counter diet pills pose a serious health risk, especially to body-conscious adolescents who consume them in large quantities, doctors and victims of eating disorders told a congressional panel Monday. A stream of witnesses told the regulation, business opportunity and energy subcommittee of the House Small Business Committee that diet aids available in most drug stores "play a significant role" in adolescent eating disorders.
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