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Weight Reduction Programs

HEALTH
May 17, 1999 | HAMILTON UNDERWOOD
In January 1998, just short of my 30th birthday, I realized that a myriad of bad habits was frustrating me in every facet of my life. My weight was the most obvious sign of my recklessness. I used to eat everything and ask for dessert--everyone's. My reputation grew, along with me. People became disappointed if I didn't consume some stunning amount of food and drink, then slip into a food coma on the dining room floor. At about the same time, I started working at March Air Reserve Base.
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HEALTH
September 13, 1999 | RICARDO VEGA
Ever since I could remember, I've had trouble with my weight. As a kid and teenager, I was always pudgy. But a year or so after high school, I got really huge. I ballooned up to 350 pounds, and maxed out at 375 pounds in early 1997. So, from 1990 until 1997, I was in the neighborhood of 350 to 375 pounds. My New Year's resolution for 1997, I decided in late '96, would be to lose weight. First and foremost, I had to carefully watch what I ate.
HEALTH
August 24, 1998 | ROSE REAL
In 1991 I was 150 pounds (at 5 feet, 2 inches), overweight, depressed and sad, having just buried my husband of 41 years after many years of illness. My inclination at the time was to be alone and not bother with friends or acquaintances. I ate whatever I wished and occasionally picked up candy or sweets and ice cream. Now there was just me alone--no need to share. I joined a country-and-western line-dance instruction class, and when they played "Waltz Across Texas," I cried and sat down.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration is one step away from approving a new kind of diet drug, provided its manufacturer can clear up concerns about the drug's possible link to breast cancer. The drug, Xenical (pronounced ZEN-i-cal), could be the much-sought successor to the popular diet drug combination known as fen-phen, which all but ended when one of the two drugs in its potent formula was pulled from the market in September after being linked to potentially life-threatening heart valve problems.
HEALTH
June 13, 2005 | Emily Singer, Special to The Times
Even as a new wave of dairy commercials touts eating yogurt and other dairy products as a way to shed unwanted pounds, new research shows that drinking excess milk can cause weight gain in older children. "We're concerned that adolescents will see the ads and conclude that drinking large amounts of milk will be an easy way to lose weight," says lead researcher Catherine Berkey, a biostatistician at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.
HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oprah Winfrey hopes to motivate the overweight with her video "Oprah: Make the Connection" (Buena Vista, $23), which hits stores Tuesday. "I'm not interested in telling people how many sit-ups to do," says the Emmy-winning TV talk show personality, actress and producer. "I am interested in people connecting." It took Winfrey, 43, most of her adult life to "connect"--to find a weight loss program that works for her. "I had done everything," Winfrey says. "I've done the Diet Center, NutriSystem.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials of the diet industry, which has been under scrutiny by a House subcommittee, defended their programs Monday, insisting they are medically supervised and based on sound nutritional guidelines. "There are no quick fixes, no effortless miracle cures," said Allen Stewart, president of The Diet Center Inc., of Rexburg, Ida. "Obesity is a chronic, recurring illness. One that cannot be cured, but one that . . .
NATIONAL
June 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Low-carbohydrate diets are leading Americans to poor health and are spawning a rip-off industry of "carb-friendly" products, health experts and consumer advocates said in announcing the formation of a group called the Partnership for Essential Nutrition. The group said it wanted to help educate Americans about the need for healthy carbohydrates such as vegetables, fruits, beans and whole grains.
HEALTH
June 7, 2004 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
It's there, looming six weeks in the future: a summer vacation where bathing suits and shorts are mandatory attire. But the thought of squeezing into either sends you into a cold panic. Those 20 extra pounds that have been hanging on for dear life need to go. Can you lose them in a few short weeks without resorting to unsafe crash diets or questionable supplements? Yes, if you have a will of steel to stick to a strict workout program and a sensible diet for several weeks.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1991 | S. J. DIAMOND
Billed as the beginning of a crackdown on diet programs, the Federal Trade Commission's recent charges against Optifast, Ultrafast and Medifast liquid diet programs are actually just the most recent of such government actions. Before the liquids, there were Fibre Trim, Fat-Magnet diet pills, the Ultimate Solution Diet Program, Dream Away diet pills, Le Patch, La Creme, even magic glasses to make food look unappealing.
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