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Weight Reduction

HEALTH
June 2, 2008 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
Throw out any thoughts that weight reduction surgery is a shortcut to svelte. The surgery, performed on about 200,000 Americans a year, is a last resort to rescue people in danger of dying early from the health consequences of their extreme obesity. After years of question marks, studies now show the surgery saves lives, sustains long-term weight loss and combats -- maybe even reverses -- diabetes.
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HEALTH
May 19, 2008 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
If he's good enough to be Oprah's personal trainer and food muse, surely he's got some tipsfor the rest of us. In his book "The Best Life Diet," exercise physiologist and fitness author Bob Greene expands on his signature concept: Weight loss is a lifetime commitment that starts within. -- Are you seeing changes in the way people are approaching food and exercise?
HEALTH
March 10, 2008 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The product: Contestants on the current season of NBC's "The Biggest Loser" have been taking a slightly offbeat approach to shedding pounds. In addition to sweating on treadmills and sticking to near-starvation diets, they've been chewing gobs of gum -- Wrigley's Extra sugar-free gum, to be exact. Product placement on reality TV is nothing new; even the castaways on "Survivor" have enjoyed regular doses of Doritos. But on "The Biggest Loser," the gum has become a prominent part of the show.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2008 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Casting doubt on the benefit of low-calorie sweeteners, research released Sunday reported that rats on diets containing saccharin gained more weight than rats given sugary food. The study in the journal Behavioral Neuroscience found that the calorie-free artificial sweetener appeared to break the physiological connection between sweet tastes and calories, driving the rats to overeat. Lyn M.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2008 | By Denise Gellene, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Casting doubt on the benefit of low-calorie sweeteners, research released Sunday reported that rats on diets containing saccharin gained more weight than rats given sugary food. The study in the journal Behavioral Neuroscience found that the calorie-free artificial sweetener appeared to break the physiological connection between sweet tastes and calories, driving the rats to overeat. Lyn M. Steffen, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Minnesota, who was not involved in the latest report, said the study offered a possible explanation for the unexpected association between obesity and diet soda found in recent human studies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2007 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
With a class of dieters in front of her, Flora Becker nodded at a misshapen yellow plastic mass propped on a nearby chair. "This is Mr. Five Pound Fat," Becker said. "It's estimated that the average person gains from five to seven pounds from Fat Thursday to Happy New Rear Day." Her charges laughed, but the topic at hand -- how to face food demons on Thanksgiving -- was no joke on Wednesday in the meeting room of a Burbank Weight Watchers office.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2007 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
While loosening your belt after Thanksgiving dinner, you may want to clip a pedometer to it. The reason: Just wearing a step counter leads to weight loss and lower blood pressure, according to research released Tuesday. The researchers found that a pedometer is an unusually good motivator to get people to walk more. People who used a pedometer for 18 weeks walked an average of seven additional miles weekly and shaved 0.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Being 25 pounds overweight doesn't appear to raise your risk of dying from cancer or heart disease, says a new government study. The news isn't all good: Overweight people do have a higher chance of dying from diabetes and kidney disease. And people who are obese -- generally those more than 30 pounds overweight for their height and with a body-mass index at least 30 -- have a higher risk of death from a variety of illnesses, including some cancers and heart disease.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2007 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
You've heard the hype before: "Eat all you want and still lose weight!" It's the Holy Grail of diets and just about as obtainable, according to the Federal Trade Commission. But the peddler of a new pill -- Akavar 20/50 -- is advertising just that on late-night TV, in print and online. And the company says it has scientific proof to back up the claim. It had better, if the diet company doesn't want to eat its claims.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2007 | From the Associated Press
raleigh, n.c. -- People will lose weight for money, even a little money, suggests a study that offers another option for employers looking for ways to cut healthcare costs. The research published in the September issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine found that cash incentives could be a success even when the payout was as little as $7 for dropping just a few pounds in three months.
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