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Welfare Programs California

NEWS
September 4, 2000 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Legislature decided in the final hours of its session last week to extend the government-sponsored Healthy Families program to 600,000 low-income parents but failed to pass a measure to pay for the expansion. Even without a clear decision on funding, the move to broaden the program was hailed by many last week as a significant step toward patching gaping holes in California's health coverage for the working poor. Still, major uncertainties remain--starting with whether Democratic Gov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time 4-year-old Juan Carlos visited a dentist, his teeth were decayed and he cried from the pain of his gum infection. He needed immediate care and two teeth were eventually extracted. His mother thought that she had enrolled him in a government-assisted health insurance program that would cover the costs. But like other poor and recent immigrants, she discovered too late that she had been victimized. Months earlier, she had called a toll-free number that she read on a flier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
La Toyia Williams has a simple plea for officials who administer California's subsidized child-care program: Deliver in a timely fashion the quality child care that was promised to impoverished families like hers. Social advocates say there are too many mothers like Williams, struggling to move from welfare to work but running up against a child-care system that is complex, confusing and more a barrier than a help.
NEWS
February 7, 2000 | KRISTI GARRETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first comprehensive study of the effects of welfare reform on young children suggests that poor children's lives do not improve when their mothers go to work. Reformers overhauling the nation's welfare system in 1996 said they were ending the "cycle of dependence" many families experience generation after generation. Mothers who work to support themselves feel better about themselves, they said, and their children benefit too.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Rewarding states in which welfare recipients found and kept jobs, President Clinton distributed $200 million in bonus money Saturday to 27 states for doing more than simply cutting welfare rolls. California, in large part because of its sheer size, received $45 million of the total. Clinton further refined what it means to succeed in welfare reform, saying that next year's bonuses will also reward states that get medical benefits and food stamps to low-income families.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first success stories from California's welfare reform are just months away from losing the child care subsidy that freed them to work. In Los Angeles, an estimated 5,200 parents--mostly mothers--who got off welfare and found jobs will hit the two-year cutoff for child care assistance between January and June. Statewide, about 13,000 people will lose the money, according to reports released at a Capitol hearing Monday to consider options for extending the subsidy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite California's growing economy, the number of working families in the state who are going hungry every day is also growing, participants in a two-day hunger workshop warned Sunday. At fault is a dwindling use of food stamps by low-income wage earners, who either think they are no longer eligible for the federal assistance or have been erroneously told they don't qualify for it, said experts taking part in the California Nutrition Initiative Conference in Santa Monica.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California led the nation in reducing the rate of births to unwed women without driving up abortions over the last few years, the federal Department of Health and Human Services said Monday. The state will share a $100-million award with the District of Columbia, Michigan, Alabama and Massachusetts for success in discouraging single parenthood, a major goal of the landmark Welfare Reform Act of 1996. Each jurisdiction will get $20 million.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since the 1996 passage of welfare reform, California has met stiff federal work requirements, even for hard-to-employ two-parent families, many of whom are recent immigrants. In a startling turnabout from a year ago, the state's booming economy, coupled with a precipitous drop in welfare rolls, has allowed California to comply with the central demand of reform--putting families on aid to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1999 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Welfare recipients and advocates for the poor urged government officials on Friday to expand job training programs and work opportunities as a deadline approaches for many to get off public assistance. "The problem is that people are getting part-time jobs, but they're not getting out of poverty," said Sam Mistrano, director of the Human Services Network, who helped organize the public hearing in a South Los Angeles church.
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