Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWelfare Programs
IN THE NEWS

Welfare Programs

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
With a new fiscal year rapidly approaching and Gov. George Deukmejian holding fast to his threat to eliminate funding for the state's family planning program, local family planning officials Monday stepped up their campaign to keep the program's multimillion-dollar budget intact. Stacks of postcards pre-addressed to the governor awaited patients visiting T.H.E. Clinic for Women in South Los Angeles, where officials gathered to protest the proposed budget cuts that would eliminate the state's Office of Family Planning and the $36.2 million it distributes to more than 170 clinics in the state.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 9, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) made a host of changes to his sweeping welfare-reform bill Friday in an effort to bridge a deep Republican rift that has delayed passage of the politically popular measure. The carefully crafted changes were aimed at providing something for everyone, but it was far from clear whether they would succeed.
OPINION
July 29, 1990
The Times should be commended for its outstanding series "Poverty in America" by Stanley Meisler and Sam Fulwood III (Part A, July 15-19). Poverty in America could be virtually wiped out, a presidential commission told us 20 years ago, if the U.S. government would guarantee every needy American a minimum income--with no strings. The chairmen of IBM, Westinghouse and Rand, former California Gov. Edmund G. (Pat) Brown and 17 others agreed with economist Milton Friedman that "we should replace the ragbag of welfare programs with a single, comprehensive program of income supplements in cash--a negative income tax. It would provide an assured minimum to all persons in need, regardless of the reasons for their need."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1994 | JAMES N. ADLER, James N. Adler is a lawyer and chairman of the Los Angeles County Public Social Services Commission. and
President Clinton in a recent press conference spoke eloquently of the importance of having a job, both to the individual and to the fabric of our society. Without the structure and opportunity to contribute meaningfully to society--features of almost all jobs--people deteriorate mentally and physically, their families disintegrate or become dysfunctional, their children become disadvantaged and often delinquent and their communities become dilapidated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1995 | ROBERT RECTOR, Robert Rector is senior analyst for family and welfare issues at the Heritage Foundation, a Washington-based public policy research institute. and
As Congress and the White House sally forth to slay the evils of welfare, it might be a good idea to find out just how big the monster is. It's pretty big. When most people think of welfare, they think of Aid to Families With Dependent Children and food stamps; or if they're really up on it, they know about the Supplemental Security Income program for the elderly, blind or disabled, or the Women, Infants and Children food program. That's four programs, and they're sizable.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Complaining about "a system that is too bureaucratic," President Bush urged Congress on Friday to pass legislation he said would give states greater flexibility in running welfare programs while toughening work requirements for recipients. The House might vote as soon as next week on a bill that would revise the landmark welfare law passed in 1996. Bush, in a speech here, stressed the need to cut the rules Washington imposes on states receiving federal welfare funds.
NEWS
February 16, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, in his strongest language on the subject to date, on Saturday denounced the nation's welfare system as "misguided" and said that it has made the problem of poverty worse instead of better.
NEWS
August 1, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole pushed their competing versions of welfare reform before the nation's governors Monday as Clinton announced tentative approval for California to cap the amount of money welfare families can receive for additional children. Clinton's announcement, made in a speech to the National Governors Assn.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration said Wednesday that a bipartisan plan by the nation's governors to overhaul welfare and Medicaid is unacceptable to the White House, warning Congress that significant modifications are needed to avoid endangering poor children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997 | DICK ACKERMAN, Assemblyman Dick Ackerman (R-Fullerton) represents the 72nd District, covering Anaheim Hills, Brea, Fullerton, La Habra, Placentia and Yorba Linda
The current welfare system is in need of reform. Republicans and Democrats alike agree. Congress and the president affirmed this by placing the states in charge of their own welfare programs. In its 70-year history, the system has incurred enormous costs, sending the federal and state governments drastically over budget. It has woven a crippling cycle of dependency through generations of families. The consensus is that encouraging people to work will remedy these problems.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|