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Welfare Programs

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1995 | ROBERT RECTOR, Robert Rector is senior analyst for family and welfare issues at the Heritage Foundation, a Washington-based public policy research institute. and
As Congress and the White House sally forth to slay the evils of welfare, it might be a good idea to find out just how big the monster is. It's pretty big. When most people think of welfare, they think of Aid to Families With Dependent Children and food stamps; or if they're really up on it, they know about the Supplemental Security Income program for the elderly, blind or disabled, or the Women, Infants and Children food program. That's four programs, and they're sizable.
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NATIONAL
May 11, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Complaining about "a system that is too bureaucratic," President Bush urged Congress on Friday to pass legislation he said would give states greater flexibility in running welfare programs while toughening work requirements for recipients. The House might vote as soon as next week on a bill that would revise the landmark welfare law passed in 1996. Bush, in a speech here, stressed the need to cut the rules Washington imposes on states receiving federal welfare funds.
NEWS
February 16, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, in his strongest language on the subject to date, on Saturday denounced the nation's welfare system as "misguided" and said that it has made the problem of poverty worse instead of better.
NEWS
August 1, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole pushed their competing versions of welfare reform before the nation's governors Monday as Clinton announced tentative approval for California to cap the amount of money welfare families can receive for additional children. Clinton's announcement, made in a speech to the National Governors Assn.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration said Wednesday that a bipartisan plan by the nation's governors to overhaul welfare and Medicaid is unacceptable to the White House, warning Congress that significant modifications are needed to avoid endangering poor children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997 | DICK ACKERMAN, Assemblyman Dick Ackerman (R-Fullerton) represents the 72nd District, covering Anaheim Hills, Brea, Fullerton, La Habra, Placentia and Yorba Linda
The current welfare system is in need of reform. Republicans and Democrats alike agree. Congress and the president affirmed this by placing the states in charge of their own welfare programs. In its 70-year history, the system has incurred enormous costs, sending the federal and state governments drastically over budget. It has woven a crippling cycle of dependency through generations of families. The consensus is that encouraging people to work will remedy these problems.
NEWS
September 13, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from Democrats and moderate Republicans, Senate leaders agreed during a closed-door meeting Tuesday to modify their welfare reform blueprint by requiring states to maintain a certain level of state contributions toward assistance programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR and JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Activists and lobbyists are waging a desperate, almost quixotic campaign to save the benefits of Los Angeles County welfare recipients, saying that thousands of people will face hunger and homelessness under proposed state budget cuts. Since June, they have held nearly a dozen protests and mailed a flurry of letters to legislators. They have produced studies predicting social catastrophe if the cuts are implemented.
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush dispatched a team of federal officials to Los Angeles on Monday to assess the city's needs in the wake of three days of rioting, while the White House blamed the upheaval on "the liberal programs of the '60s and '70s." The President complained that Congress' refusal to heed his Administration's requests are hampering government efforts to deal with urban problems.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | from Associated Press
President Clinton accused Republicans on Saturday of offering tax breaks to the wealthy at the expense of poor children and said his vision for the future is of a government that is "lean, not mean." Opening a public debate over the deep cuts in social welfare spending envisioned by the GOP's "contract with America," Clinton used his weekly radio address to defend subsidized school lunches and efforts to rid schools of drugs.
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