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OPINION
September 15, 2013 | By Rahul K. Parikh
Would you be willing to share with your employer how much you eat, drink, smoke or exercise? And would you be willing to make lifestyle changes in return for a break on the cost of your health insurance? The University of Minnesota offered such discounts to its workers. Actions such as completing a health questionnaire, biking to campus or setting personal fitness goals earned insurance discounts beginning at $300. Nearly 6,000 employees accepted the bargain. But do such programs have the intended effect of healthier employees and lower healthcare costs?
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 27, 2014 | James Barragan
The NCAA and its member institutions often refer to "student-athletes," but the front side of the term isn't often highlighted in a sports section. We asked officials from the Southland's 10 Division I universities to point us toward their best and brightest -- the teams that made classroom performance a priority. Eight of the schools chose to participate and here is what we found: -- Many of the best tennis players at the college level have been raised in hyper-competitive environments.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Lee Romney
KLAMATH, Calif. -- Lauren Alvarado states it simply: “Meth is everywhere in Indian country.” Like many here, she first tried methamphetamine at age 12. Legal trouble came at 13 with an arrest for public intoxication. In the years that followed, she relied on charm and manipulation to get by, letting her grandmother down often. But today, at 31, Alvarado and her grandmother have built a new trust. She has been clean for nine months, she said recently, and is “hopeful, more grateful.” Her recovery has come through a novel wellness program that puts traditional Yurok values to work to heal addicted men and women from California's largest tribe, whose ancestral land -- and reservation -- hugs the banks of the Klamath River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Jean Merl
Attorney Barbara Mulvaney prosecuted killers in Rwanda and promoted democracy for the U.S. State Department in Iraq before returning to Los Angeles and running for Congress. She could hardly believe it when a local Democratic club barred her - and several other candidates of that party - from the dais at a recent campaign forum. "I'm a very qualified candidate," Mulvaney said in an interview, taking issue with the club's decision to include only those who had raised at least $200,000 for their campaigns.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Anne Harnagel
Travelers to Las Vegas now can do more to protect their health and well-being than just skipping the smoke-filled casinos and gut-busting buffets. On Monday, the MGM Grand and real estate developer Delos will open 42 Stay Well rooms and suites in the hotel's main tower with at least a dozen health-and-wellness amenities. Among the rooms' features are special lighting to help reverse jet lag and regulate melatonin levels, advanced air purification and water filtration systems, vitamin C-infused water for showers, healthful room-service options and access to wellness, stress and weight management software developed by the Cleveland Clinic that guests can use for up to 60 days after their stay.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2009 | By Kim Geiger and James Oliphant
Some reader questions about the proposed healthcare legislation in Congress: Will abortions be covered by the legislation as it stands now? The House healthcare bill passed this month includes a provision that would bar the government-run insurance plan (the "public option") and all private insurance plans that receive federal dollars from covering abortion services. Employers can offer abortion coverage under their benefits packages. The Senate is considering similar provisions, but has not decided on specific language.
HEALTH
May 15, 2011 | By Olga Khazan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Between the sheet-cake birthday parties and hours-long, cookie-fueled management meetings, office work has a way of undermining all our plans to live healthfully. Americans spend nearly nine hours at work each day — and our sedentary jobs wreak havoc on our bodies. Three-quarters of adults get little or no activity daily, according to Dr. James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Two-thirds of Americans are overweight, and obesity accounts for 63 million physician office visits each year.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Contraband candy has led to big trouble for an eighth-grade honors student. Michael Sheridan was stripped of his title as class vice president, barred from attending an honors student dinner and suspended for a day after buying a bag of Skittles from a classmate. School spokeswoman Catherine Sullivan-DeCarlo said the New Haven school system banned candy sales in 2003 as part of a districtwide school wellness policy. Supt. Reginald Mayo said he would review the decision to suspend the boy.
NEWS
November 6, 1986
A $7-million development program has been announced for the Santa Monica Family YMCA. Half of the money will come from tax-exempt financing and half from a community fund-raising drive. Lowell T. (Pat) Patton, YMCA president, has been named general campaign chairman. In December, 1985, the City Council unanimously passed an ordinance that allowed the YMCA to secure tax-exempt financing in the form of a $3.5-million revenue bond.
NEWS
February 14, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Sometimes it's hard to tell the difference between a simple cold and the flu, and when such symptoms merit a trip to the doctor. Here's an expert who can help with some winter wellness advice for parents and children. Dr. Ari Brown, author and spokeswoman for the American Academy of Pediatrics, will be the guest at a live Web chat Tuesday (1 p.m. EST, noon CST and 10 a.m. PST) with Chicago Tribune reporter Julie Deardorff. Flu shots, ear infections and other illnesses will be part of the online discussion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Joseph Serna and Kate Mather
Images of footprints and handprints inside the wheel well of a Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45 jetliner appear to bolster the fantastic story of a Santa Clara teenager who reportedly survived a frigid, perilous journey cooped up inside as a stowaway. The images, including of a footprint on the tire below the wheel well, were taken by Hawaii News Now,  and appear to support the boy's story of surviving the 5-1/2 hour flight from San Jose while enduring sub-zero temperatures and deathly thin air. Authorities said it was a miracle the 15-year-old boy survived in the wheel well, as oxygen was limited at the jet's cruising altitude of 38,000 feet, and the temperature could have dropped to 50 degrees below zero or lower.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | By Edward J. Pinto and Stephen D. Oliner
Even though the recent financial crisis is barely in the rearview mirror, risk is starting to build once again in both the U.S. mortgage and housing markets. Contrary to the prevailing view that only borrowers with pristine credit records can get a mortgage these days, many risky loans are still being made. A new index published by the International Center on Housing Risk at the American Enterprise Institute measures this risk month by month, based on about three-quarters of all home-purchase loans extended across the country.
WORLD
April 22, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
ANSAN, South Korea - For South Korea, a country that pulled itself out of abject poverty to become the world's 15th-largest economy, the most stinging accusation about last week's ferry sinking is that it looks like a Third-World disaster. While the captain escaped and the crew dithered and bickered with emergency officials, hundreds of passengers, most of them high school students, obediently remained in their cabins as the ferry rolled and slipped beneath the surface of the cold, gray sea. Mistake piled atop mistake turned a near-shore mishap into the nation's worst maritime disaster in decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
The story of the 16-year-old Santa Clara, Calif., teenager who hopped a fence and stowed away in the wheel well of a Hawaii-bound jet is terrifying and astonishing. That he survived such a journey is the stuff of miracles. As my colleague Kurt Streeter wrote , the FAA has reported that stories like these are plausible: Heat from hydraulic lines in the wheel well along with retained heat in the tires can help keep stowaways warm, the FAA reported. In addition, a plane's steady climb to high altitudes can allow passengers to drift into an unconscious state as oxygen becomes scarce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
Authorities said it was a "miracle" that a 16-year-old boy from Santa Clara survived a flight from California to Hawaii in the wheel well of a Hawaiian Airlines jet. Security video from San Jose's Mineta International Airport verified that the teen hopped a fence and made his way to Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45, then managed to climb up the wheel well of the plane and stow away without being detected. He emerged unharmed despite freezing temperatures and a lack of oxygen on a flight that reached an altitude of 38,000 feet, an FBI official said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna, Kate Mather and James Rainey
The dark of night still draped Mineta San Jose International Airport when a 15-year-old boy from nearby Santa Clara wandered onto a secure airport ramp and toward a Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767. Then he disappeared. The slight teenager, first seen on a security camera video, would not appear again until later Sunday morning, when airline workers spotted him 2,350 miles to the west, walking on the tarmac at Kahului Airport on the island of Maui. In the interim, authorities say, the boy survived a perilous, 5 1/2 -hour odyssey - enduring frigid temperatures, oxygen deprivation and a compartment unfit for human habitation - as he traveled over the Pacific Ocean in the jet's wheel well.
HEALTH
January 31, 2011
Your Jan. 3 story "Is It Your Boss' Business?" contains a misrepresentation about Safeway's experience controlling healthcare costs. Here are the facts straight from the source. Safeway's "all in" healthcare costs (for employees and the company) are the same today as they were five years ago, which is 33% lower than the national average increase in healthcare costs. During this period, Safeway reversed the national trend of rising obesity within our workforce and reduced the weight of that same group year-over-year.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2008 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to choosing broadband Internet providers, you can't always get what you want. But with certain limitations, you can get what you need. If you use the Internet regularly, chances are you already have broadband -- that is, a high-speed hookup, usually through your cable television provider or phone company. But are you getting it at the right speed and right price? There are more choices than ever, even though you typically have to go with a provider that serves your neighborhood.
OPINION
April 20, 2014 | By Michael S. Teitelbaum
We've all heard the dire pronouncements: U.S. science and technology is losing ground to its global competitors because of a nationwide shortage of scientists and engineers, due primarily to the many failures of K-12 education. But are these gloomy assertions accurate? Nearly all of the independent scholars and analysts who have examined the claims of widespread shortages have found little or no evidence to support them. Salaries in these occupations are generally flat, and unemployment rates are about the same or higher than in others requiring advanced education.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was lost and now it's found, and the world of Orson Welles enthusiasts, which very much includes me, counts itself grateful and amazed. I am talking about 66 minutes of footage from an endeavor called "Too Much Johnson," which Welles shot in 1938, three years before "Citizen Kane" changed everything. Not only had this material never been seen publicly, it had been presumed gone forever when the villa in Spain where Welles thought it was stored burned down nearly half a century ago. Discovered in a warehouse in Pordenone, Italy, by local film society Cinemazero and beautifully restored via a collaboration between the George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y., and the National Film Preservation Foundation, "Too Much Johnson" is ready for its Los Angeles close-up.
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