Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWendy Wasserstein
IN THE NEWS

Wendy Wasserstein

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1990
Some comments about Wendy Wasserstein, the subject of Barbara Isenberg's Oct. 7 article, and Wasserstein's play, "The Heidi Chronicles": I too am a sad person, serious and, yes, even sexy. I am also female, and I too go to a gym. (A story about a gym is an important part of Wasserstein's play.) When I stand in the locker room after a workout, naked and sweaty and, yes, tired, I don't see "types" around me. I don't see tight jeans and power suits and super women, all my adversaries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Wendy and the Lost Boys The Uncommon Life of Wendy Wasserstein Julie Salamon Penguin Press: 461 pp., $29.95 Along with their crackling urban wit, Wendy Wasserstein's plays are notable for their introspective candor about the plight of certain well-educated baby boomer women - "uncommon women," to borrow the phrase from her breakthrough drama "Uncommon Women and Others" - trying to reconcile professional ambitions with personal...
Advertisement
BOOKS
May 13, 1990 | Sonja Bolle
Playwright Wendy Wasserstein (author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning "The Heidi Chronicles," among other plays) practices a mordant style of humorous feminist essay which broadens the category familiar from columnists like Cynthia Heimel and Alice Kahn. Wasserstein's "Bachelor Girls" are not just women caught between post-puberty and middle-aged Angst; they are sisters doing battle with the woman's lot in life from from Day 1 to death.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2007 | Sean Mitchell, Special to The Times
When Christine Lahti took over the title role in Wendy Wasserstein's "The Heidi Chronicles" on Broadway in 1989, she began a lasting association with the playwright that continued through Lifetime's adaptation of "An American Daughter" in 2000 (later renamed "Trial by Media") and continues now, after Wasserstein's death, with the West Coast premiere of her final play, "Third."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1994 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who inexplicably falls for the oldest of "The Sisters Rosensweig," in the play of the same name, sells fake furs for a living. He calls them "synthetic animal protective coverings." Although the play is not as fake as the furs--Wendy Wasserstein drew on aspects of her own family when she wrote it--it still feels fairly bogus at the Doolittle Theatre. The characters are synthetic people in synthetic situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half-a-dozen years ago, when the Heidi of the hour wasn't a madam but a Ms., Wendy Wasserstein's play "The Heidi Chronicles" captured the Angst of a generation. The tale of a 40ish urbanite struggling to balance her personal longings with her commitment to the women's movement, it was one of the relatively few dramas written by a woman ever to achieve mainstream success. Now "The Heidi Chronicles" is being made into a TV movie by the TNT cable channel.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wendy Wasserstein was "beyond nervous" about bringing her watershed 1988 Broadway comedy-drama "The Heidi Chronicles" to the small screen. She was "terrified." "You feel very protective of ... a play which meant a lot to you and to other people," Wasserstein explains. She notes she recently saw a high school production of "Heidi," which won her a Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Award. "It's just fine as a play. I said, 'Fine. There it is. It's alive and well.'
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Don't get playwright Wendy Wasserstein started on all the stuff she sat through as a kid: "My parents took me to see 'No Time for Sergeants,' and there were hardly any girls in it. 'Operation Petticoat' was about these dumb girls in slips." Yale's drama school was no better: "We were reading a lot of Jacobean dramas where men would kiss the lips of women, and then drop dead because of the poison. I thought this is all very interesting, but this doesn't represent anyone I possibly know.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Taking the timeless author's dictum "Write what you know" very much to heart, playwright Wendy Wasserstein has built a career documenting the dreams, pursuits and foibles of the "Me" generation. Clearly she knows them very well.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
"I feel stranded," says art historian Heidi Holland, talking to a group of alumnae from Miss Crain's School, "and I thought the whole point was that we wouldn't feel stranded. I thought the point was that we were all in this together." In a nutshell, or a phrase, that's what "The Heidi Chronicles" is all about: feeling stranded in the '80s. Except that this is the '90s, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Wendy Wasserstein play that opened Sunday at the James A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Lola Wasserstein, 89, an inspiration for many of the characters in the works of her daughter, playwright Wendy Wasserstein, died of natural causes Saturday at her Manhattan apartment, her family said. Lola Wasserstein was a model for the "Isn't It Romantic" character Tasha Blumberg, an untraditional Jewish mother who takes dance classes and wears skirts over black leotards.
OPINION
February 4, 2006 | MEGHAN DAUM
PLAYWRIGHT Wendy Wasserstein's death Monday, at 55, from lymphoma, saddened the theater community, surprised the public and deeply shocked women of a certain time and mind-set in ways we can't quite get our minds around.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2006 | Barbara Isenberg, Special to The Times
In the first five minutes of "The Heidi Chronicles," the play that won Wendy Wasserstein the 1989 Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize, a teenage Heidi Holland turns down an invitation to dance with the student council president. Sorry, she says. She can't leave her girlfriend. Women friends and colleagues were crucial to Heidi and to Wasserstein, who died this week at 55 of lymphoma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Wendy Wasserstein, who won a Pulitzer Prize, a Tony Award and considerable popularity writing comic yet pointed plays and essays about the nagging choices and disappointments that many Baby Boom women encountered on the path to "having it all," died Monday. She was 55. Wasserstein died at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, according to Andre Bishop, artistic director of the Lincoln Center Theater. The cause of death was lymphoma.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | Naomi Glauberman, Special to The Times
Sloth Wendy Wasserstein Oxford University Press: 114 pp., $17.95 * Everyone likes to talk about sin. Not just the scandalous details of celebrity slip-ups recounted in the tabloids or on cable TV, but the very notion of sin itself. Inspired perhaps by this indisputable fact, the New York Public Library and Oxford University Press co-sponsored a lecture series on the "Seven Deadly Sins" beginning in 2002. Scholars, critics and writers gave lectures that are being issued as neat little books.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2004 | Judy Chia Hui Hsu, Times Staff Writer
"What's in a name?" a famous bard once wrote. "That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." But could someone named Biff ever be president? Could a Gertrude ever become Miss America? And what about the Wendys of the world? Would they feel their name was as integral to their identity if they knew it had been created by an early 20th century writer? In fact, many of them do know that Scottish author Sir J.M.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, Laurie Winer is The Times' theater critic
In New York there is a saying: Only three kinds of people go to the theater--Jews, homosexuals and Jewish homosexuals. Clearly this is not literally true, but it does acknowledge that commercial theater has traditionally catered to a specific audience. These two (or three) groups are not only avid theatergoers, but they also write and are the subject of more than a representative share of commercial hits, from works by Arthur Miller to Herb Gardner to Tony Kushner to Wendy Wasserstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2007 | Sean Mitchell, Special to The Times
When Christine Lahti took over the title role in Wendy Wasserstein's "The Heidi Chronicles" on Broadway in 1989, she began a lasting association with the playwright that continued through Lifetime's adaptation of "An American Daughter" in 2000 (later renamed "Trial by Media") and continues now, after Wasserstein's death, with the West Coast premiere of her final play, "Third."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2001 | J. WYNN ROUSUCK, BALTIMORE SUN
Wendy Wasserstein no longer has a to-do list. In the preface to her recently published collection of essays, "Shiksa Goddess," the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright writes: "When I turned 40 I made a To Do list composed mostly of items left over from when I turned 30." It's not that, at 51, Wasserstein has finally "done it all," but she has achieved several of those pesky leftover goals.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2000 | VALERIE J. NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside a stately Hancock Park manor meant to evoke a Georgetown manse, the resolution of a multilayered story is being filmed. A daughter (Christine Lahti) tells her tuxedoed U.S. senator father (Stanley Anderson) that she called the president to tell him whether she will remain a nominee for surgeon general. He knows, her father says, because he heard it on the radio. What should have been a private moment has been stolen from the family.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|