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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Moviegoers checking into "The Grand Budapest Hotel," Wes Anderson's new movie about a swashbuckling concierge and his dutiful protege in 1930s Europe, will encounter many of the director's aesthetic idiosyncrasies, such as dollhouse-like sets, quirky characters and deadpan dialogue. According to film critics, however, "Grand Budapest" isn't just a movie for Anderson aficionados - it's an accomplished work that deserves attention even from nonbelievers. The Times' Kenneth Turan writes that while Anderson's films can be "hermetic, even stifling," his latest "is anything but. " In "Grand Budapest," Turan says, "the writer-director's familiar style blends with a group of unexpected factors to create a magnificently cockeyed entertainment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey
It is crazy how much mayhem is contained within the incredible precision of Wes Anderson's "The Grand Budapest Hotel. " Ralph Fiennes as its concierge M. Gustave and Tony Revolori as its lobby boy Zero Moustafa lead a marvelous cast in this meticulously played parlor game. Saoirse Ronan, Willem Dafoe, Tilda Swinton, Adrien Brody, Jeff Goldblum, F. Murray Abraham and Jude Law are among the many. There is always great specificity in the way Anderson stacks the deck, but "Budapest" is the writer-director's grandest gambit yet, every word, every move, every stray hair in its prescribed place.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Will the actors and filmmakers from your favorite movie be making room on their mantels this award season? Or watching the Oscars from afar? Oscar 8-Ball knows all. Throughout the coming months, Gold Standard columnist Glenn Whipp will assess the chances of every film in contention. Maybe that includes "Ted. " Probably it doesn't. Only the magic Oscar 8-Ball knows. We start by rounding up the early comers, beginning with Wes Anderson's beguiling storybook tale, "Moonrise Kingdom.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
After the coffee. Before the green beer. The Skinny: Happy St. Patrick's Day! That was quite an earthquake, L.A. folks. Anyone who read my box-office projector column this week saw everything turn out as expected. Just kidding! Some people thought "Need for Speed" could race away with the weekend victory. So, of course, it landed in third. Monday's stories include the box-office roundup, Bob Iger succession stories and some apparent issues with the "Veronica Mars" digital downloads.  Daily Dose: CBS Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Wes Anderson sweats the details. All of them, all the time, to an extent that can be maddening. But not in "The Grand Budapest Hotel," where the writer-director's familiar style blends with a group of unexpected factors to create a magnificently cockeyed entertainment. With credits including "Moonrise Kingdom," "The Darjeeling Limited" and the stop-motion animation "Fantastic Mr. Fox," Anderson works so assiduously to create obsessively detailed on-screen worlds that the effect has sometimes been hermetic, even stifling.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Henry Chu and Oliver Gettell
One of the chief pleasures of watching a Wes Anderson movie is being immersed in the idiosyncratic, slightly off-kilter worlds he creates. The director's latest effort, "The Grand Budapest Hotel, whisks the audience to a fictional country in pre-World War II Europe to follow the escapades of a famed concierge seeking to recover a famous Renaissance painting with the help of his trusted lobby boy. After the film opened the Berlin International Film...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Wes Anderson called the other day from his office in Paris to talk about his latest film, that magical tale of first love, "Moonrise Kingdom. " You can read Anderson's thoughts on the movie here in a 13-image gallery we put together. But while we had him on the line, we couldn't resist asking about the project he's currently prepping. "We're getting ready to make a movie in Germany," Anderson says. " 'Grand Budapest Hotel' or 'Grand Hotel Budapest.' " Told that we'd heard it titled "Grand Budapest Hotel," Anderson chuckled.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
Wes Anderson's "The Grand Budapest Hotel" may be hitting theaters after awards season ends, but the film has landed a different kind of honor: It will open the 2014 Berlin International Film Festival. The Fox Searchlight film will kick off the European event next February, a few weeks before its theatrical debut in the U.S. on March 7. Anderson's last picture, "Moonrise Kingdom," launched at the Cannes Film Festival in 2012, but both his  " The Royal Tenenbaums " and " The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou " have played in competition at Berlin in years past.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The release of a new Wes Anderson film has been a highly anticipated event among the quirky filmmaker's fans ever since his breakout success "Rushmore" in 1998. "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is debuting in four theaters in New York and Los Angeles on Friday, is sure to continue that tradition.  The movie takes place in Eastern Europe between World War I and World War II and stars Ralph Fiennes as a hotel concierge who befriends a lobby boy. It has generally won over critics, as indicated by a 89% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes -- a good sign for a limited release poised to expand nationwide over the next few weeks.  REVIEW: Wes Anderson makes 'Grand Budapest' a four-star delight Better known for offbeat critical darlings than box office smashes, Anderson has nonetheless generated  some money-makers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
More than just about any other major American filmmaker working today, writer-director Wes Anderson doesn't so much make movies as create worlds. Each of his films takes place in its own strange sovereignty, whether the Texas prep school of "Rushmore," the train running through India in "The Darjeeling Limited" or the island hideaway for a pair of adolescent lovers in "Moonrise Kingdom. " His latest, "The Grand Budapest Hotel," is set in the fictional country of Zubrowka. Though the story skips through multiple time periods, the main action is set in the 1930s against the backdrop of impending war, as a meticulous yet rambunctious concierge known as Monsieur Gustav H. (Ralph Fiennes)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
DreamWorks Animation's "Mr. Peabody & Sherman" scored a box-office victory with a strong second weekend as "Need for Speed" fell short of expectations and "Tyler Perry's The Single Moms Club" bombed.  The 3-D animated "Mr. Peabody," a comedy about a hyper-intelligent, time-traveling dog and his adopted boy, took in an estimated $21.2 million in ticket sales Friday through Sunday in the United States and Canada.  The kid-friendly film distributed...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Chris Barton
The sequel "300: Rise of an Empire" is proving unstoppable at the box office on its opening weekend, earning more than $17 million on Friday, according to estimates. The number adds to an already strong start for the 3-D Greco-Persian epic, which earned $3.3 million in its Thursday night screenings across the U.S. and Canada. The film is expected to earn $45 million this weekend, which would place it well behind the first "300. " That film opened in 2007 with nearly $71 million in sales and eventually took home $456 million worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Moviegoers checking into "The Grand Budapest Hotel," Wes Anderson's new movie about a swashbuckling concierge and his dutiful protege in 1930s Europe, will encounter many of the director's aesthetic idiosyncrasies, such as dollhouse-like sets, quirky characters and deadpan dialogue. According to film critics, however, "Grand Budapest" isn't just a movie for Anderson aficionados - it's an accomplished work that deserves attention even from nonbelievers. The Times' Kenneth Turan writes that while Anderson's films can be "hermetic, even stifling," his latest "is anything but. " In "Grand Budapest," Turan says, "the writer-director's familiar style blends with a group of unexpected factors to create a magnificently cockeyed entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The release of a new Wes Anderson film has been a highly anticipated event among the quirky filmmaker's fans ever since his breakout success "Rushmore" in 1998. "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is debuting in four theaters in New York and Los Angeles on Friday, is sure to continue that tradition.  The movie takes place in Eastern Europe between World War I and World War II and stars Ralph Fiennes as a hotel concierge who befriends a lobby boy. It has generally won over critics, as indicated by a 89% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes -- a good sign for a limited release poised to expand nationwide over the next few weeks.  REVIEW: Wes Anderson makes 'Grand Budapest' a four-star delight Better known for offbeat critical darlings than box office smashes, Anderson has nonetheless generated  some money-makers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
More than just about any other major American filmmaker working today, writer-director Wes Anderson doesn't so much make movies as create worlds. Each of his films takes place in its own strange sovereignty, whether the Texas prep school of "Rushmore," the train running through India in "The Darjeeling Limited" or the island hideaway for a pair of adolescent lovers in "Moonrise Kingdom. " His latest, "The Grand Budapest Hotel," is set in the fictional country of Zubrowka. Though the story skips through multiple time periods, the main action is set in the 1930s against the backdrop of impending war, as a meticulous yet rambunctious concierge known as Monsieur Gustav H. (Ralph Fiennes)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Wes Anderson sweats the details. All of them, all the time, to an extent that can be maddening. But not in "The Grand Budapest Hotel," where the writer-director's familiar style blends with a group of unexpected factors to create a magnificently cockeyed entertainment. With credits including "Moonrise Kingdom," "The Darjeeling Limited" and the stop-motion animation "Fantastic Mr. Fox," Anderson works so assiduously to create obsessively detailed on-screen worlds that the effect has sometimes been hermetic, even stifling.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Times
Wes Anderson won't formally begin his next movie, "The Grand Budapest Hotel," until the new year, but he's on the phone after a busy day spent filming "little shots" in Saxony with a very good German driver named Peet who's quite adept, Anderson says, at weaving through traffic behind the wheel of an old car that Anderson's production team has meticulously converted into a taxi. Anderson admits he's still puzzling over the success of his last film, the coming-of-age comedy "Moonrise Kingdom," which has received best picture nominations for the Spirit Awards and Golden Globes and grossed more than twice the box office of each of his previous three films.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Noel Murray
Jimmy P. Available on VOD beginning Feb. 20 French filmmaker Arnaud Desplechin is responsible for some of the most audacious and entertaining films in world cinema today: movies such as "Kings and Queen" and "A Christmas Tale," which take offbeat approaches to relatable family dramas. Desplechin's "Jimmy P. " drew mixed reviews when it debuted at the Cannes Film Festival last year, perhaps because it doesn't resemble the sprawling, experimental work he's best known for. It's rather a quiet, direct and talky film, with Benicio Del Toro playing a Blackfoot Indian and World War II veteran being treated by an anthropologist-therapist played by Desplechin regular Mathieu Amalric.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Tilda Swinton, as usual, made a strong fashion impression, with flat, feathered sandals and a tuxedo with a ruffle at the opening of the Berlin International Film Festival. "The Grand Budapest Hotel," in which Swinton stars along with Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Ralph Fiennes, Saoirse Ronan and others, launched the European event Thursday night. The film, by Wes Anderson, is set to open in the United States on March 7. Swinton, whose hair color has varied, had high, platinum-blond curls and bright lipstick and toes for the event, which also featured costar Murray in a dapper hat. The fashion choices were in keeping with the film.
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