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NEWS
July 24, 1988
Kudos to CBS for retaining "West 57th," arguably its finest news magazine. From its inception I have found it to be not only informative, but also entertaining. Executive producer Andrew Lack says the production has developed its own growing audience; one in which I would similarly describe myself as "loyal, young and well-educated." Indeed the savvy professionalism of each of the "West 57th" correspondents is certainly a bright spot of what has otherwise prevailed in the beleaguered world of broadcast news.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Anatomy of a highly questionable news story. . . . It was the lead segment on Saturday's installment of "West 57th," the low-rated but usually respectable CBS News magazine series. The reporter was Karen Burnes, an experienced, award-winning correspondent with an impressive record in investigative journalism. The producer was Kathy McManus. The segment's title was "The Palestinians: Dirty Business." The premise was that a "network" of Palestinians--most of whose leaders are related and come from the same area in the Israeli-occupied West Bank--is committing crimes in the United States to fund political action and terror in the Middle East.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
CBS News correspondents Meredith Vieira and Steve Kroft will leave the low-rated "West 57th" magazine series for its high-rated older brother, "60 Minutes," the network said Thursday. The shift comes three months after Diane Sawyer made her well-publicized jump from "60 Minutes" to ABC News to co-anchor a new prime-time series, and less than two months after Connie Chung left NBC to anchor what will be a revamped version of "West 57th" next fall. Vieira, 35, has been with "West 57th" since it premiered in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
CBS News correspondents Meredith Vieira and Steve Kroft will leave the low-rated "West 57th" magazine series for its high-rated older brother, "60 Minutes," the network said Thursday. The shift comes three months after Diane Sawyer made her well-publicized jump from "60 Minutes" to ABC News to co-anchor a new prime-time series, and less than two months after Connie Chung left NBC to anchor what will be a revamped version of "West 57th" next fall. Vieira, 35, has been with "West 57th" since it premiered in 1985.
NEWS
January 31, 1988
My husband and I were appalled by the pit bull report on the Jan. 9 broadcast of "West 57th" on CBS. Although the main thrust of the story was valid (not all pit bulls need to be feared by humans), the methods used to tell the story were purely sensationalistic. I had to close my eyes during extended footage of two pit bulls mauling each other, a pit bull being put to death in a pound and a dead pit bull being thrown into a plastic garbage bag for disposal. This sort of "news" has no place on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
But, at the network level, CBS news programs are also not immune from thespian aspirations. As part of the revamping of the low-rated news magazine "West 57th," the series--to be hosted next season by Connie Chung-- will occasionally use actors to reenact historic events. CBS News guidelines discourage but don't bar the use of actors and reenactments and dramatizations. The news division previously employed actors to reenact historic moments in Walter Cronkite's "You Are There" (1953-57)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Anatomy of a highly questionable news story. . . . It was the lead segment on Saturday's installment of "West 57th," the low-rated but usually respectable CBS News magazine series. The reporter was Karen Burnes, an experienced, award-winning correspondent with an impressive record in investigative journalism. The producer was Kathy McManus. The segment's title was "The Palestinians: Dirty Business." The premise was that a "network" of Palestinians--most of whose leaders are related and come from the same area in the Israeli-occupied West Bank--is committing crimes in the United States to fund political action and terror in the Middle East.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1986
CBS, which last week said its "West 57th" news series will return to its prime-time schedule the week of April 21, has changed its mind. It now will resume the series a week later, airing it at 8 p.m. Wednesdays, starting April 30. A CBS News spokesman said the series, which last year had a six-week tryout run beginning in August, will have a 13-week run this time out. A decision will be made later on whether it will be continued, the spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1986 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
CBS News' "West 57th" newsmagazine series will return to the network's prime-time schedule the week of April 21, but no decision has been made yet on which night it will resume its weekly run, a CBS spokesman said Tuesday. The announcement means that CBS will keep "West 57th" out of the prime-time ratings race until after the current season ends April 20.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1985 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Newsdance. They're young. They're beautiful. They're hip. They move. They groove. They rip. They're action. They're traction. They're pure satisfaction. Don't give them any lip. See them striding side by side down a crowded Manhattan street with fun and determination on their faces. See them hustling and bustling behind the scenes, a sense of urgency in their voices, high-tech music in their ears. They're the news maniacs from "West 57th," the CBS magazine series that premiered Tuesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
But, at the network level, CBS news programs are also not immune from thespian aspirations. As part of the revamping of the low-rated news magazine "West 57th," the series--to be hosted next season by Connie Chung-- will occasionally use actors to reenact historic events. CBS News guidelines discourage but don't bar the use of actors and reenactments and dramatizations. The news division previously employed actors to reenact historic moments in Walter Cronkite's "You Are There" (1953-57)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual deal, the executive producer of CBS' "West 57th" news series will produce a miniseries for the network's entertainment division about the much-publicized Lisa Steinberg child-abuse case here, CBS officials said Friday. But they emphasized that CBS News is not involved in producer Andrew Lack's work on the dramatization of Hedda Nussbaum's life, including her battered years with a disbarred lawyer, Joel Steinberg. Steinberg was sentenced two weeks ago in the fatal beating of the couple's illegally adopted daughter, Lisa, aged 6. The entertainment divisions of NBC and ABC also are interested in the case, in which trial testimony brought out stories of heavy drug use and beatings by Steinberg of both Nussbaum and the child.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
CBS' prime-time news magazines go overseas this weekend to provide provocative insight into two war-ravaged lands. Tonight at 10 p.m. (2)(8), "West 57th" focuses on El Salvador on the eve of that country's presidential election. The right-wing Arena party, long associated with the infamous death squads, is expected to win the election just as leftist guerrillas are stepping up their efforts to topple the government.
NEWS
July 24, 1988
Kudos to CBS for retaining "West 57th," arguably its finest news magazine. From its inception I have found it to be not only informative, but also entertaining. Executive producer Andrew Lack says the production has developed its own growing audience; one in which I would similarly describe myself as "loyal, young and well-educated." Indeed the savvy professionalism of each of the "West 57th" correspondents is certainly a bright spot of what has otherwise prevailed in the beleaguered world of broadcast news.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988
Poverty, the subject of dramas on NBC Sunday and ABC Monday, is also receiving attention from CBS. Tonight at 10, CBS is airing a segment on its news magazine "West 57th" that is similar in tone to "God Bless the Children," the ABC movie airing Monday. Producer Glenn Silber and reporter Meredith Vieira went to the Bible Tabernacle shelter and Coeur D'Alene Elementary School in Venice, Calif., to tape a report on the emotional, social and educational toll that homelessness takes on children.
NEWS
January 31, 1988
My husband and I were appalled by the pit bull report on the Jan. 9 broadcast of "West 57th" on CBS. Although the main thrust of the story was valid (not all pit bulls need to be feared by humans), the methods used to tell the story were purely sensationalistic. I had to close my eyes during extended footage of two pit bulls mauling each other, a pit bull being put to death in a pound and a dead pit bull being thrown into a plastic garbage bag for disposal. This sort of "news" has no place on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"West 57th" is back. One problem: I don't know whether to watch it or dance to it. The CBS News prime-time magazine series for hip people returns like a boomerang at 8 tonight (on Channels 2 and 8) for a fresh 13 weeks following last summer's trial. Being basically unhip, I didn't understand "West 57th" the first time around. That was my fault, not the program's. I obviously had to get my stuff together and stop being a dinosaur.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1986 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
CBS, ending weeks of speculation over the fate of its flashy new "West 57th" news magazine, said Thursday it will keep the series in production. But it made no promises that the program definitely would return to the air next season. "West 57th," which completed its 13-week spring-summer run on Wednesday, will resume production and be available as a possible mid-season replacement should an opening occur on CBS' prime-time schedule next season, a spokesman said.
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