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September 29, 2012 | By Mike Hiserman
Some much-hyped matchups actually live up to billing. Saturday's Big 12 Conference football game between Baylor and West Virginia is a prime example. The teams came in averaging a combined 98 points a game, with Nick Florence, the nation's total offense leader, in command for Baylor and Geno Smith, a leading Heisman Trophy candidate, at the controls for West Virginia. The score at the half: 35-35. The final play of the half pretty much summed up the action so far. Baylor was at its own 33-yard line as quarterback Florence dropped back to pass.
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SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
Only the very best teams in college basketball have advanced to the NCAA tournament's round of 16. Take Dayton versus Stanford in the South Regional … please. Dayton finished fifth in the Atlantic 10 Conference and absorbed a 26-point loss this season at St. Joseph's. Stanford tuned up for the NCAA tournament with an invigorating 25-point loss to UCLA. UCLA is not one to talk, though, losing its last Pac-12 Conference regular-season game, by 18, at doormat Washington State.
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SPORTS
October 25, 2009 | Mike Hiserman
Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, W.Va., is known as a hostile place for an opposing football team, but not Saturday when Connecticut arrived for its first game since cornerback Jasper Howard was slain outside an on-campus dance. Heart-shaped foam pins and armbands with Howard's uniform number, 6, were distributed at the main entrance to the stadium, and the Huskies received a long and loud ovation as they took the field. West Virginia fans even signed a banner displayed at the Connecticut tunnel entrance that read, "Today we are all Huskies."
NATIONAL
January 31, 2014 | By David Zucchino
The top public health official in Charleston, W. Va., has added to widespread criticism of the decision to declare drinking water safe despite a critical lack of scientific data about the coal-washing chemical that spilled into the Elk River on Jan. 9. Dr. Rahul Gupta, director of the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department, the largest in West Virginia, said in an interview Friday that the water can't be considered completely safe because scientists don't...
NATIONAL
April 3, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A West Virginia sheriff was shot and killed Wednesday near the Mingo County courthouse in the town of Williamson, officials said. The Williamson mayor's office told the Los Angeles Times that the victim was Mingo County Sheriff Eugene Crum. A Mingo County emergency dispatcher said that a suspect had also been shot and taken into custody, though those details could not be immediately confirmed with other law enforcement. The suspect's condition was not known. The midday shooting happened on Harvey Street near the county courthouse in Williamson, which is the southwest part of the state along the Kentucky border.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Democrat Earl Ray Tomblin narrowly held on to the governorship in West Virginia on Tuesday, despite a late effort by Republicans to tie him to President Obama's healthcare law. Tomblin, who succeeded Joe Manchin in November 2010 after his election to the U.S. Senate, led businessman Bill Maloney by nearly 8,600 votes with 86% of precincts reporting in the special election. The Associated Press declared Tomblin the winner just after 9 p.m. ET. Internal polling form both campaigns showed Tomblin leading for much of the summer, but Maloney was quickly closing the gap in the final week.
SPORTS
September 28, 2013 | By Chris Dufresne
Could this be the start of an upset binge? West Virginia, which got shut out last week by Maryland, has rebounded to scoring a somewhat shocking 30-21 win over No. 11 Oklahoma State. The Mountaineers (3-2) overcame some shaky clock management in the end to get the Big 12 win in Morgantown. Oklahoma State (3-1) is the first ranked team to fall on what you might call "Scramble Mode Saturday. " No. 12 South Carolina was not one of the early casualties, but the Gamecocks had to rally from a 10-0 halftime deficit to beat Central Florida, 28-25, in Orlando.
NATIONAL
August 15, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A local West Virginia judge has been federally indicted on suspicion of using his bench to illegally frame the husband of his secretary, with whom he'd been having an affair, officials said Thursday. These are tough times for the political leadership of Mingo County, W.Va., which saw Circuit Judge Michael Thornsbury indicted for conspiracy and manipulating a local grand jury on the same day the county's commissioner, David Baisden, was indicted for trying to extort a local tire shop.
SPORTS
October 25, 2011 | Wire reports
The Big 12 Conference has approved bringing in West Virginia to replace Missouri when the Tigers complete their move to the Southeastern Conference, a person with knowledge of the decision told the Associated Press on Tuesday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because neither the school nor the Big 12 had announced that its board of directors unanimously approved inviting West Virginia when Missouri's spot comes open. The move would allow the Big 12 to maintain 10 members and would be another blow to the embattled Big East Conference, which already has lost two members and one member-to-be in the last six weeks.
NEWS
June 24, 2010
Move over Osbournes, hit the road Kardashians, there's a new dysfunctional, reality TV-ready family in town: a lawless bunch of self-described "just right down dirty white good old people hillbillies" and the stars of the nutty, oddly involving documentary "The Wild and Wonderful Whites of West Virginia." Director Julien Nitzberg aimed a judgment-free camera at the notorious White clan, which has wreaked havoc across West Virginia's isolated Boone County ever since the family's mountain dancing patriarch, Donald Ray, left the coal mines and learned to work the system.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2014 | By David Zucchino, This post has been updated and corrected, as indicated below.
First, federal regulators couldn't explain the possible health dangers posed by the mysterious coal-cleansing chemical that spilled into West Virginia's drinking water -- except that pregnant woman shouldn't drink it even after the water had been declared safe for everyone else. Then the chemical company responsible for the spill belatedly admitted a second, equally unpronounceable chemical containing ether also had been dumped into the water. Now comes this warning for hundreds of thousands of West Virginians: They may be inhaling formaldehyde while showering in the tainted water, which was declared safe for human consumption a week after the Jan. 9 spill into the Elk River just north of downtown Charleston.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2014 | By David Zucchino
Bombarded by lawsuits and under federal investigation, the chemical company that spilled a dangerous solvent into a West Virginia river and fouled the drinking water of 300,000 people filed for federal bankruptcy protection Friday. Freedom Industries Inc., owner of a storage tank that ruptured Jan. 9 and spilled 7,500 gallons of a coal-treatment foaming agent called MCHM into the Elk River, sought protection from creditors under a Chapter 11 filing by its parent company, Chemstream Holdings Inc. of Pennsylvania.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2014 | By David Zucchino
Few people in West Virginia had any idea that an obscure company was storing a mysterious coal-washing chemical in tanks overlooking the Elk River, just upstream from a major water treatment plant. Nor did many realize that no agency had conducted regular inspections of those tanks, even though they are perched on a steep bank that tumbles down to the river northeast of downtown Charleston. On the morning of Jan. 9, residents complained about a licorice-like odor wafting from the site, operated by a chemical company with the unlikely name of Freedom Industries.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Congressional Democrats on Monday called for a hearing into "regulatory gaps" highlighted by a chemical spill that has contaminated the water supply to 300,000 West Virginia residents. "As we begin to consider ideas to reform the Toxic Substances Control Act, it is critically important that we understand how the law allowed a potentially harmful chemical to remain virtually untested for nearly 40 years," Reps. Henry A. Waxman of Beverly Hills, top Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and Paul Tonko (D-N.Y.)
NATIONAL
January 13, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The water ban that left 300,000 people in West Virginia unable to drink tap water, shower or wash their clothes was lifted in some places on Monday as the aftermath of a chemical spill stretched into its fifth day. But as hospitals began to get their water systems online and officials disbursed instructions to homeowners on how to clean out the chemical that contaminated their tap water -- and in some cases, their clothes and their dishes --...
NATIONAL
January 12, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
West Virginians saw signs of hope Sunday even as 300,000 people spent a fourth day under orders not to use their tap water after a chemical spill. "I believe we're at a point where we see light at the end of the tunnel," Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin said. Water samples had shown positive signs that traces of a coal-cleaning chemical were slowly fading from the supply for nine counties, he said. There was still no timeline on when residents could use their water again, however, forcing residents and businesses to get creative on how they could safely cook, wash their hands and wash their clothes.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2012 | By Richard Simon
A West Virginia state legislative candidate was killed by a falling tree in the intense snowstorm that Sandy swept over the region, and election officials said it is too late to remove his name from Tuesday's ballot. John Rose, 60, a Republican candidate for the House of Delegates, was the fifth person killed in West Virginia when Sandy dumped up to 3 feet of snow on the Mountain State. West Virginia Secretary of State Natalie E. Tennant said her thoughts and prayers are with the family of Rose, a Barbour County House of Delegates candidate.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2010 | By Bob Drogin and Nicole Santa Cruz
Twenty-five miners were killed Monday after a coal mine explosion deep in the rugged hills of West Virginia, marking the worst U.S. mine disaster since 1984 and raising questions about safety precautions at one of the nation's largest coal producers. The search for survivors at the Upper Big Branch mine was called off early Tuesday morning, although four miners remained unaccounted for, according to Jeff Gillenwater, spokesman for Massey Energy Co., the mine owner. Distraught families and others in the tight-knit Appalachian mining community wept and hugged nearby as rescue teams penetrated the deep shafts and dark tunnels, and as the death toll steadily rose through the long night.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
West Virginia health officials said Saturday that several people have been admitted to hospitals for chemical-related symptoms following a solvent leak into the area's water supply that has left more than 300,000 residents unable to use tap water. Seventy-three people have gone to area emergency rooms since the spill late Thursday and four have been admitted with symptoms such as skin irritation and nausea, Secretary Karen Bowling of the Department of Health and Human Resources said at a news conference in Charleston.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2014 | By Davd Zucchino
CHARLESTON, W.Va. - For the third straight day, more than 300,000 residents of West Virginia were unable to use their tap water because of a state of emergency declared after a chemical solvent leaked into the area's water supply late Thursday. As authorities on Saturday worked to flush pipes that supply water to Charleston and nine counties in the state, officials said they could still not estimate when the water would be safe to drink. Thousands of residents lined up in a driving rain Saturday morning to collect bottled water or to fill containers with drinking water supplied by emergency management agencies.
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