Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWest Wing
IN THE NEWS

West Wing

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley will be turning over some management duties in the West Wing to Pete Rouse, a senior counselor to the president who helped recruit Daley for the job ten months ago. In a Monday meeting with top advisors to President Obama, Daley informed the staff that Rouse would be taking on an “expanded operational and coordination role,” according to a senior administration official. The official said Daley was not relinquishing his role as chief of staff nor turning over responsibility for daily supervision, but rather trying to improve efficiency in how the Obama team functions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 2, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - As President Obama looks to show off all he can do without Congress, he's been pointing to a surprising place for guidance on the savvy use of power: the other side of the White House. In public and private, the president has been holding up Michelle Obama's initiatives in the East Wing as a template for how the West Wing could accomplish a policy agenda the non-legislative way. He has called his wife's team a model for what's possible, and, in his State of the Union address last week, he said, "As usual, our first lady sets a good example.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Thrusting an intelligent idealist into a leadership position is a time-honored method of chronicling the corruptive nature of power, particularly the political variety. (Please see "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington") In recent years, television writers have done a bit of narrative multi-tasking by making that person a woman--in the U.S. it was "Commander in Chief," in the U.K., "The Amazing Mrs. Pritchard. " For Denmark, in case you were wondering, it's "Borgen," a political drama that's caused a stir for the past several years among American critics seeking to prove that such shows need not devolve into soap, sentiment or satire.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Actor Rob Lowe has LIT- ruh -lee no qualms about having ties to Bill O'Reilly. The 49-year-old actor stars as worshiped Democratic president John F. Kennedy in National Geographic's "Killing Kennedy," based on the book from the Fox News anchor. Lowe, who is familiar with playing people in politics, big and small -- "The West Wing's" Sam Seaborn, "Parks and Recreation's" Chris Traeger -- was once well-known for his liberal political views, but now views himself as an independent moderate . But none of that was really a factor when it came to doing a project based on O'Reilly's work, he said.  "I didn't think about it at all," the in-all-places actor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
It's been seven years since the end of President Jed Bartlet's second term on the NBC drama, "The West Wing," but the memory of the series is still fresh enough that when Rob Lowe unexpectedly stepped into the real White House briefing room, the assembled reporters couldn't help but geek out. Lowe played White House deputy communications director Sam Seaborn on the first four seasons of the series, which ran from 1999 to 2004. Though the real-life journalists have been raging against the real-life White House Press Secretary Jay Carney lately after the news of the Justice Department's surveillance of the Associated Press and Fox News, the attitude toward the actor was warm.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2009 | Christi Parsons
On some afternoons in the West Wing, as he wonders how best to convey the White House's messages about an economic downturn, financial calamity, job loss and tough foreign policy challenges, Robert Gibbs finds himself thinking about a turtle named Yertle. The press secretary to President Obama is trying to figure out whether he can get home for story time with his 5-year-old son, Ethan, whose book of choice is frequently the Dr. Seuss classic about the king of the pond.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2006 | Lisa de Moraes, Washington Post
As recently as last week, NBC promised that for one hour this Sunday, we could watch as "the cast of the Emmy Award-winning 'West Wing' pauses to reflect on the evocative drama's seven years on NBC with a retrospective of many emotional and touching scenes that made the [Bartlet] administration come alive to millions of Americans." But as NBC learned the hard way, some cast members of "The West Wing" don't cough up an hour of "emotional" and "touching" for nothing. Not even for cheap.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2005 | From wire and staff reports
Is TV going back to its roots? NBC's "Will & Grace" started off its season with a live episode and now the network's "The West Wing" is going to follow suit. The Nov. 6 episode will be broadcast live, featuring a debate between the fictional presidential candidates played by Alan Alda and Jimmy Smits. It will be performed twice -- once for the East Coast feed, then again for the West Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2001 | Howard Rosenberg
Hail to the chief. If the one in the White House and his staff are as proficient and inspiring as their fictional counterparts were in Wednesday night's special terrorism-themed episode of "The West Wing," Americans are well-served in the grief-driven, war-footing aftermath of Sept. 11. Are George W. Bush and the people around him this good? Please let them be this good. But not this preachy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
Writers on "The West Wing" aren't expected to begin grappling with how to deal with actor John Spencer's death until after the holidays. Spencer, 58, who played former White House chief of staff and now vice presidential candidate Leo McGarry in the political drama, died of a heart attack Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
It's been seven years since the end of President Jed Bartlet's second term on the NBC drama, "The West Wing," but the memory of the series is still fresh enough that when Rob Lowe unexpectedly stepped into the real White House briefing room, the assembled reporters couldn't help but geek out. Lowe played White House deputy communications director Sam Seaborn on the first four seasons of the series, which ran from 1999 to 2004. Though the real-life journalists have been raging against the real-life White House Press Secretary Jay Carney lately after the news of the Justice Department's surveillance of the Associated Press and Fox News, the attitude toward the actor was warm.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Thrusting an intelligent idealist into a leadership position is a time-honored method of chronicling the corruptive nature of power, particularly the political variety. (Please see "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington") In recent years, television writers have done a bit of narrative multi-tasking by making that person a woman--in the U.S. it was "Commander in Chief," in the U.K., "The Amazing Mrs. Pritchard. " For Denmark, in case you were wondering, it's "Borgen," a political drama that's caused a stir for the past several years among American critics seeking to prove that such shows need not devolve into soap, sentiment or satire.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
When veteran filmmaker Roland Emmerich was first offered the chance to direct a movie about terrorists taking over the White House, he couldn't believe his luck. "It's such a good idea," Emmerich, the money-minting director of movies such as "2012," said last week at a Culver City editing facility, where he has been holed up polishing his new film, "White House Down. " "I was surprised no one had done it before. " It turns out someone has. Just before. Emmerich's movie, about a wannabe Secret Service agent with a Messiah complex who serendipitously ends up at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. during a fiery terrorist attack, will come out June 28. That's barely three months after the release Friday of Antoine Fuqua's "Olympus Has Fallen" - about a wannabe Secret Service agent with a Messiah complex who serendipitously ends up at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. during a fiery terrorist attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | MARY MCNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
If you ask a smart, talented, prolific, highly opinionated and possibly overextended writer to create a series for you whenever he gets the chance, you might get a terrific television show. Or you might get "The Newsroom," which is what HBO got when it approached Aaron Sorkin with just such a request. Sorkin, of course, is the man behind "Sports Night" and "The West Wing," two of the truly great workplace shows of our time, as well as the short-lived "Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip" which was not. He has also written a fistful of admirable screenplays, including last year's Oscar-winning "The Social Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
John Gray, who rode off into retirement about 16 months ago after 11 years as president of the Autry National Center of the American West, is making an unexpected return astride one of the world's most-visited cultural institutions: He's been named director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History inWashington, D.C. "His passion for American history and scholarship is obvious, and it's what will make him a great leader...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bradley Whitford, 52, has shuttled among theater, film and television since his Emmy-winning run on "The West Wing" ended in 2006. He plays one of three men arguing about an abstract painting in the Pasadena Playhouse's revival of "Art," opening Sunday, and stars in the horror film "The Cabin in the Woods," opening in April. Is this your first appearance onstage at your hometown theater? How did this come about? David Lee, a wonderful director, and Sheldon Epps, who runs the theater, asked if I was interested in doing this particular role in this particular play.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2004 | Tony Perry
Bravo channel reruns of NBC's "The West Wing" in recent days have had a surprisingly topical plot line: a bloody coup in Haiti, an elected president fears for his life, U.S. Marines sent to restore order, and the White House aswirl with military, diplomatic and political considerations. "A shootout in the presidential palace is the worst possible alternative," says the fictional national security advisor.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2002
REGARDING Brian Lowry's column about "The West Wing" ("How High Can You Fly on a Left 'Wing'? Viewers Cast Their Vote," Nov. 13): Here's the problem with "The West Wing" for many of us: We can't hear and can't understand what's going on. No, we're not deaf and yes, we can manage a remote control. Some of the actors don't enunciate, some of the lines are so clipped and fast, and some of the references are so subtle. And it's gotten worse this season. Gail Giberson Orange I am a liberal Democrat, mind you, but I think the show has slowed down quite a bit. I'd like more of the feisty first lady and C.J. Right now, it's too much about a bunch of smart, yet somewhat boring, white guys.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Actress Anjelica Huston is standing at the edge of a large mirrored rehearsal space as dancers and choreographers circulate around her. Preparation for a big Broadway number is frenetically underway. In one corner, performers limber up; in another, they nervously await a director's judgment. It might seem like any rehearsal for any one of the numerous musicals that play this city nightly. Except this isn't a Broadway musical or even a rehearsal — the cameras are rolling on the set of "Smash," a new fictional television series about the theater world.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley will be turning over some management duties in the West Wing to Pete Rouse, a senior counselor to the president who helped recruit Daley for the job ten months ago. In a Monday meeting with top advisors to President Obama, Daley informed the staff that Rouse would be taking on an “expanded operational and coordination role,” according to a senior administration official. The official said Daley was not relinquishing his role as chief of staff nor turning over responsibility for daily supervision, but rather trying to improve efficiency in how the Obama team functions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|