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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1990 | ADAM GARFINKLE, Adam Garfinkle is coordinator of the political studies program at the Foreign Policy Research Institute in Philadelphia.
Now that Moscow agrees to a united Germany in NATO, the question is: What's the new NATO supposed to do? The Warsaw Pact is gone and with it the old rationale for a prominent U.S. role in Europe. A post-Cold War NATO with united Germany at its heart and America far away is undoubtedly prelude to a continental Pax Germanica. That would be a great mistake and American policy can prevent it. Seeing how NATO, and the U.S.
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OPINION
December 15, 2010 | Tim Rutten
As much of the world once more prepares to celebrate the birth of Christ, it is a melancholy fact that many of the most ancient churches established in his name are being pushed to the brink of oblivion across the region where their faith was born. The culprits are Salafist Islam's increasingly virulent intolerance, the West's convenient indifference and, in the case of Iraq, America's failure to make responsible provisions to protect minorities from the violent disorder that has persisted since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1986 | HANNES ADOMEIT, Hannes Adomeit is a senior staff member at the Research Institute for International Politics and Security in Ebenhausen, West Germany. He is currently visiting fellow at the Rand/UCLA Center for the Study of Soviet International Behavior
Not unexpectedly, the Soviet-American summit meeting produced meager results; differences of view about arms control, regional conflicts and human rights are as big as ever. As a result, an important question looms larger today than before: Will Mikhail S. Gorbachev now play "the European card"? The West was allowed to catch a glimpse of the Soviet Union's European card just one year ago. Gorbachev, who was then the Central Committee secretary and heir-not-yet-so-apparent to Konstantin U.
TRAVEL
October 1, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
WHEN I was a little girl, I used to lie in bed at night, eyes closed, trying to imagine how the room would look if my feet were where my head was. My recent travels in Eastern Europe have been a little like that for me, an exercise in intentional self-disorientation that has allowed me to see things from fresh angles.
NEWS
September 17, 1991
After 50 years of world war, cold war and communism, Europeans are in the process of resuming the 20th Century. The end of communism in the East and the imminent economic integration in the West have unleashed forces of nationalism and ethnicity that had been contained for decades by oppressive governments or higher concerns of regional security.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1989
President Bush no doubt intends to honor custom by briefing the European allies after he meets with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Dec. 2-3. That's not enough. Why not get the Europeans' perspective before he holds talks on issues that affect them so fundamentally?
OPINION
June 7, 1992 | Gregory Treverton, Gregory F. Treverton is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he directs the Pew Project on America's Task in a Changed World. He is author of "America, Germany and the Future of Europe" (Princeton University Press)
Nationalism is rampant in Eastern Europe, and is now emerging as a potent force in Western Europe as well. Danes sent just that message last week, to both their politicians and to those in Brussels. By referendum, they narrowly defeated the landmark Maastricht treaty signed during the European Community summit in December, a treaty supported by four-fifths of the Danish Parliament.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1994 | ROBERT GERALD LIVINGSTON, Robert Gerald Livingston directs the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies at the Johns Hopkins University in Washington
Americans need to understand that ancient cultural divisions underlie today's military-strategic argument between the Clinton Administration and the East Europeans about where to "draw the line" in Europe, whether to bring Eastern European countries into the Atlantic Alliance (NATO) quickly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1989 | ALEX PRAVDA, Alex Pravda is a fellow of St. Antony's College, Oxford University
From across the Atlantic, West European responses to the revolution sweeping Eastern Europe may well appear confused and baffling. After two world wars and more than 40 years of division, old ambitions and fears--long considered dormant, if not dead--are re-emerging in all their historical complexity. Viewed from Western Europe, the picture appears just as complex but less puzzling and certainly less surprising.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is now a virtual certainty that the rich democracies of Western Europe will fail in one of their major political goals of the 1990s: halving the region's crippling unemployment rates by the end of the century. And as expectations drop, there is mounting concern about the prospects of making any substantial progress at all in reducing what is widely acknowledged as the region's single most serious social problem.
TRAVEL
November 7, 2004 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
I could never fathom why people return to the same place over and over. There's so much of the world to see. But I'm now beginning to understand how a place can grow on you, having been twice to the Ardennes. I first visited this lovely, low-key corner of western Europe in August in stultifying heat and electrical storms to celebrate my 50th birthday. I passed that milestone with surprising contentment at a fine, old country inn.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2002 | Bloomberg News, From Bloomberg News
European stocks swooned Monday on concerns that the narrow victory of Germany's Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder in Sunday's election will fail to spur economic growth in Europe's largest economy. Investors' uncertainty about the global political situation and the possibility of war with Iraq also continued to weigh on European markets, and a weak opening on Wall Street further dampened investors' spirits. The Dow Jones Stoxx 50 index--which tracks European blue chips--shed 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER LAYNE, Christopher Layne is a visiting scholar at both UCLA's Center for Social Theory and Contemporary History and the Cato Institute
Foreign policy finally has emerged as a campaign issue, sparked by the proposal advanced last Friday by Texas Gov. George W. Bush's top national security advisor, Condoleezza Rice. Rice stated that one of the first priorities of a Bush administration would be to have the Western Europeans assume full responsibility for NATO's peacekeeping in the Balkans.
NEWS
February 11, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dog's life just got better. At least, the life of a traveling dog, or cat, will be significantly improved starting Feb. 28 when Britain relaxes its century-old quarantine laws to allow some animals into the country on pet passports. This undoubtedly will be a great relief to French poodles, German shepherds and other continental canines that will be allowed into Britain without first spending six months in solitary confinement to prove they are disease-free. U.S.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world was very old, precisely 4,952 years old, according to learned brains of the time, and novel and disturbing things were happening. Never had so much money been in circulation, and never had so many seemed so eager to possess it. As Europe approached the year 1000, the population--and cities--had begun to grow. Tracts of forest were being cleared and planted to feed the additional mouths.
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | RAF CASERT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Even the long-tolerant Dutch are reaching their limit over the influx of refugees seeking political asylum or more prosperous lives in Europe. For Dr. Toine Aarts, it came when authorities announced plans to open an asylum center in his exclusive neighborhood. He banded with eight other wealthy residents and bought the only building suitable for such a use, thus making sure it would not be a refuge for asylum seekers. "Do you have to be so tolerant that you accept just anything?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER LAYNE, Christopher Layne is a visiting scholar at both UCLA's Center for Social Theory and Contemporary History and the Cato Institute
Foreign policy finally has emerged as a campaign issue, sparked by the proposal advanced last Friday by Texas Gov. George W. Bush's top national security advisor, Condoleezza Rice. Rice stated that one of the first priorities of a Bush administration would be to have the Western Europeans assume full responsibility for NATO's peacekeeping in the Balkans.
NEWS
September 17, 1991
Having entered the last decade of the century, Western Europeans are largely free of old worries about politics. Gone is the era when Spain fretted over the fragility of its democracy, France felt eternally divided and Britain argued about its role in the old empire. Except in Germany, politics are not foremost in people's minds. Instead, they sense a host of economic problems, especially unemployment. This has put West Europeans in a self-centered mood.
NEWS
June 22, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The fast-growing U.S. economy won praise from leaders of the world's richest industrialized nations Saturday, but their blueprint for promoting global economic growth committed other countries to undertake painful domestic reforms. At the first such gathering with extensive participation by Russia, President Clinton, Russian President Boris N.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1995 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a scene in Italian filmmaker Nanni Moretti's recent "Caro Diario" in which an intellectual who scoffs at television becomes addicted to a U.S. soap opera. Later, while mountain climbing, he runs into some Americans. Reasoning that they're at least a season ahead on the soap, he plaintively inquires about the fate of his favorite characters. Romance isn't the only international language. There's also soap opera. And in countries where the O.J.
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