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BUSINESS
April 17, 2012 | David Lazarus
If a major company found out that a scammer was using its name to defraud people, you'd think it would do everything possible to nab the guy. Think again. Is it any wonder there's only about a 2% conviction rate for identity theft cases, according to law-enforcement authorities? Western Union figures prominently in various scams involving people being duped into wiring money abroad. A common racket is for hackers to break into someone's online address book and then send emails to all your friends seeking financial assistance.
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BUSINESS
September 23, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Here is a roundup of alleged cons, frauds and schemes to watch out for. Online car sales - Two foreign nationals have pleaded guilty to running an Internet auto-sales scam that caused victims to lose more than $4 million. Corneliu Weikum, 38, a Romanian citizen who lives in Germany, and Yulia Mishina-Heffron, 24, of Russia, were accused of advertising cars for sale on popular websites such as Yahoo, EBay and AutoTrader, taking payment from victims and then never delivering the cars.
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NEWS
July 28, 1985
The United Telegraph Workers union, representing 6,500 technicians, operators and clerks, called a strike against Western Union Corp. when talks on a new three-year contract broke down in Hollywood, Fla., over pay and job security disputes. The company, which lost $58.4 million last year, was negotiating past deadline with the 600-member Communications Workers of America union in Westbury, N.Y.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2012 | David Lazarus
If a major company found out that a scammer was using its name to defraud people, you'd think it would do everything possible to nab the guy. Think again. Is it any wonder there's only about a 2% conviction rate for identity theft cases, according to law-enforcement authorities? Western Union figures prominently in various scams involving people being duped into wiring money abroad. A common racket is for hackers to break into someone's online address book and then send emails to all your friends seeking financial assistance.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Representatives of Western Union Corp. and striking United Telegraph Workers met Monday for the first time since the 2-day-old walkout by 6,500 employees began, but little progress was made, a union official said. The sides did not discuss the major issues--company proposals to contract out work to non-union members, shift health benefit costs to workers and lay off 1,500 to 2,000 workers, UTW international President Richard Brockert said.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
Western Union will pay $94 million to settle a long-running legal battle with the state of Arizona over whether the company allowed its money transfers to be used to send proceeds from human trafficking and drug smuggling to Mexico, officials announced Thursday. The settlement includes $50 million that will help law enforcement operations in border states fight money laundering. Western Union has also agreed to beef up its internal procedures to stop its wire transfers from being exploited.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Western Union Financial Services Inc. said it completed its purchase of Orlandi Valuta, which provides money transfers from the U.S. to Mexico, for an undisclosed price. The unit of Paramus, N.J.-based First Data Corp. said Orlandi Valuta will operate as an independent company and continue to use the Orlandi Valuta name. Orlandi Valuta agents will sell Western Union products and services, including money transfer, money orders and in-person bill payment services.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
After 155 years in the telegraph business, Western Union has cabled its final dispatch. The service that in the mid-1800s displaced pony-borne messengers has itself been supplanted over the last half-century by cheap long-distance telephone service, faxes and e-mail. In a final bit of irony, Denver-based Western Union informed customers of its decision last week in a message on its website. The terse notice was in keeping with telegraphese, the language that customers devised to hold down costs.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Western Union Corp. shareholders have approved a restructuring plan, the troubled telecommunications company said Monday. The vote represents a major step for Western Union, the 136-year-old company that linked the United States with telegraph wires. Without the plan, the company has said it may have to file for bankruptcy protection. Two more parts of the proposal must be completed: an exchange of debt for equity in the new company and the raising of $500 million in "junk bonds."
BUSINESS
January 17, 1985
The firm and DHL Worldwide Courier Express started Express Document, a two-hour and overnight delivery service for documents generated on Western Union's EasyLink electronic mail, to 30 major U.S. cities and to more than 25,000 communities worldwide. Priced at $20 for two-hour delivery and $7.75 for overnight service, Express Document is $5 less than ZapMail's two-hour facsimile service and $10 less than MCI's four-hour delivery service.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
Buying and selling on Internet classified sites such as Craigslist can be a great way to find a deal and make extra cash. But it can also expose you to a host of scams. Here are some tips to help keep you from being ripped off: •Meet the other party in person. By following this single rule, according to Craigslist, you will avoid 99% of attempted scams on the site. Any time the other party is unable or unwilling to meet face to face, it should be a huge red flag. •Never wire money to the other party.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2011 | By Brendan Case
Money-transfer company MoneyGram International Inc. had a near-death experience as one of the more unlikely victims of the mortgage meltdown. Pummeled by losses starting in 2007 on mortgage-related investments, it stayed afloat when private equity fund Thomas H. Lee Partners and Wall Street titan Goldman Sachs Group Inc. swooped in, provided an infusion of cash and took control in 2008. Shareholders in MoneyGram, based in Dallas, recently approved a deal that analysts say is a step toward the eventual exit of Lee Partners and Goldman.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2010 | David Lazarus
It's called the "emergency scam" because its victims are typically asked to wire money to assist some friend or family member in trouble. This month, the Arcadia Police Department issued a warning that local seniors have been receiving calls from someone claiming to be a relative who needs bail money to get out of the slammer. The calls, needless to say, are bogus. But more often than not, the emergency scam is perpetrated online, usually after someone's e-mail or Facebook account has been hacked.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2010
Jobless data better than expected The number of newly laid-off workers seeking unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week to the lowest total in a month. The Labor Department said that first-time claims for unemployment insurance dropped by 43,000 to a seasonally adjusted 440,000. Wall Street economists expected a smaller decline of 15,000, according to a survey by Thomson Reuters. The four-week average, which smooths out fluctuations, fell by 1,000 to 468,500, the first drop after three weeks of increases.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
Western Union will pay $94 million to settle a long-running legal battle with the state of Arizona over whether the company allowed its money transfers to be used to send proceeds from human trafficking and drug smuggling to Mexico, officials announced Thursday. The settlement includes $50 million that will help law enforcement operations in border states fight money laundering. Western Union has also agreed to beef up its internal procedures to stop its wire transfers from being exploited.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2009 | Josh Meyer
The bleeding body of Mexican immigrant Javier Resendiz Martinez was the first thing police noticed when they raided the bungalow on North 63rd Avenue here four years ago after reports of gunshots. Soon afterward, however, they found payment logs of more than 100 wire transfers to Western Unions in the border town of Caborca, Mexico -- which state and federal officials cite as evidence that the financial services company and other money transmitters are used by Mexican crime syndicates to help facilitate the smuggling of people into the United States.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Western Union Co., the largest U.S. money-transfer company, said Wednesday that it had won a court ruling that bars Arizona from seizing funds sent by customers in other states to Mexico as part of a probe into drug and immigrant smuggling. Arizona Atty. Gen. Terry Goddard obtained a warrant in September to intercept transfers of $500 or more between 28 U.S. states and 26 places in Sonora, Mexico, so he could look for criminal ties.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Justice Department has opened a civil antitrust investigation of Western Union Financial Services, the money-transfer subsidiary of First Data Corp. The government has demanded information about contracts between Western Union, which runs the world's largest consumer money transfer network, and its independent agents, First Data said. Denver-based First Data said Western Union's contract practices "reflect common industry norms." First Data rose 38 cents to $38.88 on the NYSE.
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008 | catharine hamm
Question: I traveled to London for official purposes. Unfortunately all my money was stolen at the hotel. I don't know what to do or where to go. I didn't bring my phone, and the hotel telephone line was disconnected during the robbery, so I have access only to e-mails. Please, can you send me 1,500 pounds today so I can return home? As soon as I get home I would refund it immediately. I want you to send it through the Western Union outlet.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2008 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
The 3-year-old girl was found two years ago starving, abandoned and covered in lice in a countryside home in the northeastern European nation of Latvia. Her name was Kristina. Her parents had abandoned her. Her grandmother, who had taken her in, had frozen to death. Latvian officials classified her as an orphan. Soon New York residents Ilze and Laurence Earner heard about the girl. Ilze Earner is a nationally renowned child welfare advocate, and she also happened to be a distant relative of Kristina.
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