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Western United States

NATIONAL
October 1, 2008 | Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writer
This tiny community nestled on the backside of Pike's Peak revels in its mining heritage. Tourists are invited to tour underground tunnels, gamble in the Gold Rush and Gold Diggers casinos or view a video at a museum entitled, "The Timeless Art of Gold Extraction." They can shop for trinkets in the stores set up in Victorian houses built during Cripple Creek's mining heyday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2008 | Kenneth R. Weiss and Michael Rothfeld, Times Staff Writers
West Coast governors urged the federal government Tuesday to keep new oil drilling rigs out of their waters and to spend more money on programs to restore the health of the Pacific Ocean. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, a Republican, joined with Democratic Govs. Ted Kulongoski of Oregon and Chris Gregoire of Washington to reaffirm their opposition to opening undersea oil fields to new drilling, as part of an elaborate action plan for preserving coastal waters.
NATIONAL
May 27, 2008 | Maeve Reston, Noam N. Levey and Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writers
The top Democratic and Republican presidential contenders, Barack Obama and John McCain, brought their campaigns to the deserts of the American West on Monday, kicking off what is shaping up to be a fierce contest for the region in November. The majestic vistas and suburban subdivisions of Colorado, Nevada and New Mexico were among the most contested territories of 2000 and 2004, although they were often overshadowed by the struggle for electoral votes in Florida and Ohio.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2008 | Stuart Glascock, Times Staff Writer
People in Boise, Idaho, have taken pride in favorable lifestyle rankings their city has picked up recently: No. 2 on Forbes' best places for business and careers; No. 9 on Inc.com's hottest cities for entrepreneurs; No. 1 National Geographic adventure town; and No. 8 on Money magazine's best places to live. But one title startled and baffled nearly everyone: city most vulnerable to terrorism in the Western United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2007 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Stepping in where the Bush administration has refused to tread, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and five other Western governors, joined by two Canadian provincial leaders, pledged Wednesday to enforce a tough regional cap on greenhouse gas emissions. Under the Western Climate Initiative, the leaders agreed to slash emissions of carbon dioxide and other climate-warming pollutants to 15% below 2005 levels in their states and provinces in the next 13 years.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Fire crews hoped for breaks from the weather to help fight blazes fueled by high temperatures, tinder-dry conditions and gusty winds across the West on Monday. A Hot Springs, S.D., wildfire that killed a man and left more than 30 families homeless spread somewhat to the southwest of the tourist town Monday, but fire officials expected to gain on it in the next day or so. "My best guess is that we'll make some good ground on the fire," said Joe Lowe, state wildland fire suppression coordinator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2007 | Julie Cart, Jack Leonard and Jeffrey L. Rabin, Times Staff Writers
Crews stayed on the offensive against major blazes around California and other Western states Sunday, a day marked by an epic fire in Utah and evacuations of hundreds of homes in Washington, as well as a helicopter crash that hurt two firefighters in Santa Barbara County.
SCIENCE
June 30, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ranching, mining, energy exploration and other activities that raise dust in the West are helping diminish the snowpack that supplies much of the region's water, researchers reported Tuesday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. University of Colorado scientists said dust was blowing from the deserts onto the state's snowcapped mountains, absorbing more of the sun's warmth because of its darker color and melting the snow earlier and more quickly than in the past.
SCIENCE
June 30, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
If the rocks under Los Angeles were not unusually warm, the city would rest 3,756 feet beneath the Pacific Ocean, according to Utah geologists. In fact, without the rocks the only parts of the U.S. that would be above sea level would be the Pacific Northwest and the upper Rockies, they reported Monday in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2007 | Alison Williams, Times Staff Writer
A new group of retired land managers and forest rangers said Thursday that reckless off-road vehicle recreation was the No. 1 threat to public lands in the West. The 13-member Rangers for Responsible Recreation said it was voicing the concerns of many federal land management employees in the West, including in California, who report that an increasing number of riders and the growing power of the vehicles are endangering natural resources and public safety.
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