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NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
JERUSALEM - Mitt Romney and his wife made a solemn visit Sunday to the Western Wall on Tisha B'Av, a Jewish holiday of mourning commemorating the destruction of the First and Second Jewish Temples of Jerusalem. Romney was enveloped by an enormous crowd of fans and onlookers when he visited the historic holy site in the old city. After Romney's motorcade pulled into the plaza before the wall with flashing lights, the former Massachusetts governor and his wife parted ways - walking separately across the plaza to the wall, which is separated by a screen partition with men on one side and women on the other for religious reasons.
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WORLD
August 27, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Tuesday issued the starkest warning to date in response to recent saber-rattling by Syrian President Bashar Assad's government, which has said it might respond to a U.S. strike by attacking Israel. “We are not part of the civil war in Syria, but if we identify any attempt whatsoever to harm us, we will respond with great force,” Netanyahu said Tuesday after huddling for a second consecutive day with key Cabinet members to discuss the possible ramifications of a U.S. strike against Syria.
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WORLD
August 27, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- The completion of a new prayer area at the Western Wall, where men and women of all denominations can worship together, is drawing criticism from female activists who describe the arrangement as anything but inclusive. The area consists of a raised platform located just south of the main plaza and the Orthodox Jewish prayer sections, which are segregated by gender. Minister Naftali Bennett, who is in charge of religious services, said Sunday that the prayer section will offer unity and peace at the wall, which he said "belongs to all Jews in the world, and not one stream or another.
WORLD
August 27, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- The completion of a new prayer area at the Western Wall, where men and women of all denominations can worship together, is drawing criticism from female activists who describe the arrangement as anything but inclusive. The area consists of a raised platform located just south of the main plaza and the Orthodox Jewish prayer sections, which are segregated by gender. Minister Naftali Bennett, who is in charge of religious services, said Sunday that the prayer section will offer unity and peace at the wall, which he said "belongs to all Jews in the world, and not one stream or another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2000
"Israeli Women Defy Custom, Say a Prayer for Equality" (June 5) describes the "Women of the Wall" (the Western Wall in Jerusalem) as "mostly secular women" who have been praying monthly for years at that most holy site in Judaism. It is a misnomer to describe these non-Orthodox women as "secular." To do so plays into the ultra-Orthodox claim that only they are keepers of Jewish religious tradition. To be "religious" in Jewish life today has many legitimate expressions. Reform and Conservative Judaism (representing 80% of American Jewry and a rising percentage of Israeli Jews, now estimated at between 30% and 40%)
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
An American tourist from Los Angeles splashed red paint on Judaism's holiest site in an apparent protest Thursday against Israeli policies, police said. He was quickly arrested. The man arrived in the country earlier this month, police spokesman Shmuel Ben-Ruby said. "He came to Israel two weeks ago and then decided that he didn't like Israeli policies," Ben-Ruby said. The man, whose name was not disclosed, was being interrogated, police said. They gave his age as "about 60."
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | From Reuters
Israel's Supreme Court barred a Jewish women's group Monday from chanting prayers or reading the Bible aloud at Jerusalem's Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site. Ultra-Orthodox men and women have complained about the Women of the Wall group, which prays once a month at the Western Wall, a remnant of the Second Temple that is also known as the Wailing Wall. They say that, under Jewish law, women worshipers should not be heard in the presence of men.
NEWS
September 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
Rabbi Yehuda Meir Getz, the first and only Israeli rabbi to preside over the Western Wall, the holiest site in Judaism, has died of a heart attack. He was 71. Getz, who died Sunday, was to be buried on Jerusalem's Mt. of Olives, said Ofer Amar, a spokesman for the Religious Affairs Ministry. Born in Tunis, Tunisia, Getz immigrated to Israel as a child and pursued an army career.
NEWS
December 7, 1985 | United Press International
The rabbi of the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site, will light a lamp tonight to begin Hanukkah, an eight-day festival celebrating the short-lived creation of a Jewish state in 160 BC. Rabbi Yehuda Meir Getz will light the first of eight lamps at the wall at 6 p.m. to start Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights. An additional candle will be lighted each day for the next seven days in a ceremony that will be duplicated in Jewish homes and synagogues throughout the world.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | From Reuters
Jewish feminists in prayer shawls and skullcaps and carrying a Torah sparked furious protests from ultra-Orthodox rabbis Thursday when they prayed at the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest shrine. "A woman carrying a Torah is like a pig at the Wailing Wall," said Rabbi Meir Yehuda Getz, who is in charge of the site.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Carla Hall, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Sometimes the debate over gender equality around the globe is easy to decide. Women in Saudi Arabia should be able to drive cars and compete in sports. Yes, of course, girls in Pakistan should get equal education. Other times, it's not a matter of obvious civil rights. That's the case in Jerusalem, where members of an organization called Women of the Wall have, for two decades, endured taunts, threats of violence and arrest to pray at the sacred and iconic Western Wall. It's not the fact that they're praying; it's the way that they choose to pray.
WORLD
June 9, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Under heavy police protection and confronted by Orthodox protesters, hundreds of women attended prayers held Sunday morning at the Western Wall in what has become a heated religious and political issue.  Members and supporters of the Women of the Wal l organization gathered for monthly services in ways Orthodox Judaism has traditionally reserved for men, including donning prayer shawls, skullcaps and tefillin boxes. "Provocation women," read one protest sign, accusing them of inventing "a new religion.
WORLD
May 10, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews flooded into the Old City's Western Wall Plaza early Friday in a boisterous and sometimes violent protest against a group of female activists exercising a newly court-affirmed right to pray at the holy site in a similar fashion as men do. It was a rare scene of chaos, protest and sporadic clashes by Jewish worshipers in front of what most view as Judaism's most sacred place after the Temple Mount....
WORLD
May 10, 2013 | By Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO -- Prominent youth activist Ahmed Maher was arrested on Friday as he sought to leave the Cairo international airport, members of his April 6 youth movement said. Maher, who helped lead the revolution that ousted longtime President Hosni Mubarak, will be held for four days pending investigations into charges of resisting authority, insulting the police, and disturbing traffic, the Middle East News Agency reported. He was arrested only minutes after returning from the United State.
WORLD
April 11, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Israeli police detained five women for wearing prayer shawls at the Western Wall on Thursday, days after a new proposal emerged to set aside part of the holy site for men and women to pray together. Female worshippers at the sacred site are barred from performing religious rituals that Orthodox Jewish religious authorities say are solely for men. Women have repeatedly been detained for violating those rules, a continuing clash between the Orthodox rabbis who steer Israeli religious institutions and more liberal strains of Judaism in which women can use prayer shawls and lead congregations as rabbis.
OPINION
January 8, 2013
Re "Talking to a wall, connecting with God," Opinion, Jan. 4 Reform Rabbi Ben Kamin may imagine that the "stern, bearded men" he sees at the Western Wall in Jerusalem are "scolding" him "with their fierce eyes" for not wearing a skullcap, but even his imagination should not twist the facts. Rabbi Kamin's female relatives are, despite what he seems to imply, not barred from praying at the site. Yes, the area of the wall plaza is segregated by sex, befitting a place that is the remnant of the courtyard of a temple where such separation was instituted to ensure a feeling of solemnity and holiness for worshipers.
NEWS
March 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
Orthodox Jewish men hurled chairs, bottles and fruit at about 50 feminists who worshiped today at the sacred Western Wall, and police fired tear gas to break up the melee, police said. Orthodox tradition regulates how men and women may worship, and today's altercation was believed related to past efforts by Jewish feminists to worship freely at the wall. One woman was slightly injured by a chair that struck her head and neck, police spokesman Uzi Sandori said.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The clutch of demurely dressed women edged toward the ancient stones of the Western Wall, prayer books in hand, skittish in anticipation. They didn't have to wait long. The moment their voices rose in a prayerful song of the Jewish faith, the sentinels of the ultra-Orthodox sounded the alarm. "Shame! Shame!" raged an Orthodox woman. "You cannot do this. It is not permitted." Across the low partition that separates men from women at the wall, the holiest of Judaism's holy places, a bearded Orthodox man, his head covered with the white-and-black Jewish prayer shawl, grabbed a metal chair and raked it across the stone terrace, drowning the voices of the praying women and filling the air with threat.
OPINION
January 4, 2013 | By Ben Kamin
JERUSALEM - It's different each time, the sensation driven by my religious body temperature at the moment, each occasion leavened by the vicissitudes of life, by doubt, skepticism, spiritual immobility or vague rhapsody - and certainly by my own vanities. One first has to get past the sense of being an intruder, even if one is incontrovertibly Jewish, because the landlords of Jerusalem's Western Wall, a conglomerate of stern, bearded men from a variety of ecclesiastic tribes, are rather possessive of their default contract with the place.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM — On a day that mixed religious symbolism, courtship of financial donors and tough rhetoric, Mitt Romney on Sunday declared in his most aggressive tones to date that the U.S. should stand firmly behind Israel if it chooses military action to thwart Iran's progression toward a nuclear weapon. Flanked by several dozen Israeli and American flags, with the last glimmers of sunlight illuminating the walls of Jerusalem's Old City behind him, Romney argued in a speech that Tehran's ayatollahs "are testing our moral defenses" and monitoring "who will object" and "who will look the other way. " Accusing Iran of having a "bloody and brutal record," the unofficial Republican presidential nominee said, "We have a solemn duty and a moral imperative to deny Iran's leaders the means to follow through on their malevolent intentions.
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